A Festival March, for the Organ

Henry Hiles
1875 The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular  
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more » ... e Organ. Composed by-Oliver A. King. liERE iS, if not an imitation of the successful pieces by Lefebure-Wely that have the same French definition, a composition after their kind and entirely in their manner. English writers-more, it must be owned, than English players-aim generally, in music for the organ, at a more serious style than marks the piece before us; but, if extreme lightness as well as secularity of manner, be appropriable to the instrument, there is no reason why organists should not receive it with as kind a welcome from a native as from a foreign author. The OSertoire (whatever the term may mean) is perhaps a little lengthy; the matter, for instance, that precedes the second subject in A, might have been judiciously condensed when it occurs prior to the return, in the key of D, of the same second subject. The successive chords of diminished 7th, on $c and #D, p. 2, score I, follow not with euphonious effect; but then the creed is very general, honr unsound soever its basis, that chords of the diminished 7th have a special licence which supersedes all rule and right. The music is far from unmelodious nay, it is somewhat affluent in ideas, and the eSects for the instrument are most brilliant. Air Varied, for the Organ. By Henry Hiles, Mus. Doc., Oxon. A GRACEFUL melody in F, with a Variation in the same key, another Variation in F minor, and a third which is followed by a coda in the major key; this little piece displays musicianship and fancy. It will form a capital organ study, firstly, for quickly changing the stops without interrupting the music, and secondly, for transferring the hands from manual to manual and crossing either above or below the other. To our taste, its effects are fitter for the pianoforte than for the instrument for which they are intended; sustained notes are, we hold, the staple of organ writing, deviations from which, however frequent, are exceptional the removal of the finger for a semiquaver rest after a semiquaver slurred from a quaver, may improve the touch of the pianist more than advance qualities necessary for the organ, and in such points of mechanism the piece abounds. A Festisal March, for the Organ. By Henry Hiles, Mus Doc., Oxon. MENDELSSOHN has much to answer for, and still more has he who first arranged for the organ the Marches in Athalie and A Midsummer Night's Dream, for to those two men and these two marches are entirely due a host of organisms of various merit, that would never have come into being but for the precedents afore-named. This, by Dr. Hiles, has all the characteristics of its numerous class, its pointed rhythm, its two Trios respectively in F and in A flat, its brilliant emulation of orchestral effects, and its demands on a light free touch, but it is an aristocrat among the million, one of the high-born few, which, while constructed of the same elements as their fellows, are fellows to them in nothing else, being " pieces of quality, " because they possess the qualities that mark musicianship if not invention. Rose-Marie. Song. Words by F. 1Z. Weatherley. Composed by J. L. Molloy. THERE is always tune in the vocal music of this composer, and were there nothing else, the popularity he has gained might be very easily accounted for; but there is something else, for although but little is ever attempted beyond heihtening his melodies with appropriate and natural harmony, that little is carefully and conscientiously done, and the result is that his songs are ever listened to with pleasure. The present one is no exception to the rule: a peculiar effect is gained by allowing the bass to flow down with the voice part, but we do not dislike it although we should certainly have been better pleased if it had not been continued in all three verses. Both words and music will gratify those who do not despise a simple ballad, and we have little doubt that the song will become a favourite. The Childzarcll March, for the Pianoforte. By Frederick H. Burstall. THIS March was composed on the occasion of the visit Offrtoire in D for the Organ. Composed by-Oliver A. King. liERE iS, if not an imitation of the successful pieces by Lefebure-Wely that have the same French definition, a composition after their kind and entirely in their manner. English writers-more, it must be owned, than English players-aim generally, in music for the organ, at a more serious style than marks the piece before us; but, if extreme lightness as well as secularity of manner, be appropriable to the instrument, there is no reason why organists should not receive it with as kind a welcome from a native as from a foreign author. The OSertoire (whatever the term may mean) is perhaps a little lengthy; the matter, for instance, that precedes the second subject in A, might have been judiciously condensed when it occurs prior to the return, in the key of D, of the same second subject. The successive chords of diminished 7th, on $c and #D, p. 2, score I, follow not with euphonious effect; but then the creed is very general, honr unsound soever its basis, that chords of the diminished 7th have a special licence which supersedes all rule and right. The music is far from unmelodious nay, it is somewhat affluent in ideas, and the eSects for the instrument are most brilliant. Air Varied, for the Organ. By Henry Hiles, Mus. Doc., Oxon. A GRACEFUL melody in F, with a Variation in the same key, another Variation in F minor, and a third which is followed by a coda in the major key; this little piece displays musicianship and fancy. It will form a capital organ study, firstly, for quickly changing the stops without interrupting the music, and secondly, for transferring the hands from manual to manual and crossing either above or below the other. To our taste, its effects are fitter for the pianoforte than for the instrument for which they are intended; sustained notes are, we hold, the staple of organ writing, deviations from which, however frequent, are exceptional the removal of the finger for a semiquaver rest after a semiquaver slurred from a quaver, may improve the touch of the pianist more than advance qualities necessary for the organ, and in such points of mechanism the piece abounds. A Festisal March, for the Organ. By Henry Hiles, Mus Doc., Oxon. MENDELSSOHN has much to answer for, and still more has he who first arranged for the organ the Marches in Athalie and A Midsummer Night's Dream, for to those two men and these two marches are entirely due a host of organisms of various merit, that would never have come into being but for the precedents afore-named. This, by Dr. Hiles, has all the characteristics of its numerous class, its pointed rhythm, its two Trios respectively in F and in A flat, its brilliant emulation of orchestral effects, and its demands on a light free touch, but it is an aristocrat among the million, one of the high-born few, which, while constructed of the same elements as their fellows, are fellows to them in nothing else, being " pieces of quality, " because they possess the qualities that mark musicianship if not invention. Rose-Marie. Song. Words by F. 1Z. Weatherley. Composed by J. L. Molloy. THERE is always tune in the vocal music of this composer, and were there nothing else, the popularity he has gained might be very easily accounted for; but there is something else, for although but little is ever attempted beyond heihtening his melodies with appropriate and natural harmony, that little is carefully and conscientiously done, and the result is that his songs are ever listened to with pleasure. The present one is no exception to the rule: a peculiar effect is gained by allowing the bass to flow down with the voice part, but we do not dislike it although we should certainly have been better pleased if it had not been continued in all three verses. Both words and music will gratify those who do not despise a simple ballad, and we have little doubt that the song will become a favourite. The Childzarcll March, for the Pianoforte. By Frederick H. Burstall. THIS March was composed on the occasion of the visit Offrtoire in D for the Organ. Composed by-Oliver A. King. liERE iS, if not an imitation of the successful pieces by Lefebure-Wely that have the same French definition, a composition after their kind and entirely in their manner. English writers-more, it must be owned, than English players-aim generally, in music for the organ, at a more serious style than marks the piece before us; but, if extreme lightness as well as secularity of manner, be appropriable to the instrument, there is no reason why organists should not receive it with as kind a welcome from a native as from a foreign author. The OSertoire (whatever the term may mean) is perhaps a little lengthy; the matter, for instance, that precedes the second subject in A, might have been judiciously condensed when it occurs prior to the return, in the key of D, of the same second subject. The successive chords of diminished 7th, on $c and #D, p. 2, score I, follow not with euphonious effect; but then the creed is very general, honr unsound soever its basis, that chords of the diminished 7th have a special licence which supersedes all rule and right. The music is far from unmelodious nay, it is somewhat affluent in ideas, and the eSects for the instrument are most brilliant. Air Varied, for the Organ. By Henry Hiles, Mus. Doc., Oxon. A GRACEFUL melody in F, with a Variation in the same key, another Variation in F minor, and a third which is followed by a coda in the major key; this little piece displays musicianship and fancy. It will form a capital organ study, firstly, for quickly changing the stops without interrupting the music, and secondly, for transferring the hands from manual to manual and crossing either above or below the other. To our taste, its effects are fitter for the pianoforte than for the instrument for which they are intended; sustained notes are, we hold, the staple of organ writing, deviations from which, however frequent, are exceptional the removal of the finger for a semiquaver rest after a semiquaver slurred from a quaver, may improve the touch of the pianist more than advance qualities necessary for the organ, and in such points of mechanism the piece abounds.
doi:10.2307/3352264 fatcat:ac67ijil7faedo3hdvbmzi6ksq