Manipulating Wild and Tamed Phytobiomes: Challenges and Opportunities

Terrence H Bell, Kevin Hockett, Ricardo Ivan Alcalá-Briseño, Mary Barbercheck, Gwyn A Beattie, Mary Ann Bruns, John Carlson, Taejung Chung, Alyssa Collins, Bryan Emmett, Paul Esker, karen Garrett (+18 others)
2019 Phytobiomes Journal  
This white paper presents a series of perspectives on current and future phytobiome management, discussed at the Wild and Tamed Phytobiomes Symposium in University Park, PA, USA, in June 2018. To enhance plant productivity and health, and to translate lab-and greenhouse-based phytobiome research to field applications, the academic community and end-users need to address a variety of scientific, practical, and social challenges. Prior discussion of phytobiomes has focused heavily on
more » ... ily on plant-associated bacterial and fungal assemblages, but the phytobiomes concept covers all factors that influence plant function. Here we discuss various management considerations, including abiotic conditions (e.g. soil, nutrient applications), microorganisms (e.g. bacterial and fungal assemblages, bacterial and fungal inoculants, viruses), macroorganisms (e.g. arthropods, plant genetics), and societal factors (e.g. communication approaches, technology diffusion). An important near-term goal for this field should be to estimate the potential relative contribution of different components of the phytobiome to plant health, as well as the potential and risk of modifying each in the near-future. Disciplines Agriculture | Ecology and Evolutionary Biology | Plant Sciences Comments This is a manuscript of a proceeding published as Bell, 52 53 54 55 ABSTRACT 56 This white paper presents a series of perspectives on current and future phytobiome 57 management, discussed at the Wild and Tamed Phytobiomes Symposium in University Park, PA, 58 USA, in June 2018. To enhance plant productivity and health, and to translate lab-and 59 greenhouse-based phytobiome research to field applications, the academic community and end-60 users need to address a variety of scientific, practical, and social challenges. Prior discussion of 61 phytobiomes has focused heavily on plant-associated bacterial and fungal assemblages, but the 62 phytobiomes concept covers all factors that influence plant function. Here we discuss various 63 management considerations, including abiotic conditions (e.g. soil, nutrient applications), 64 microorganisms (e.g. bacterial and fungal assemblages, bacterial and fungal inoculants, viruses), Page 3 of 112 65 macroorganisms (e.g. arthropods, plant genetics), and societal factors (e.g. communication 66 approaches, technology diffusion). An important near-term goal for this field should be to 67 estimate the potential relative contribution of different components of the phytobiome to plant 68 health, as well as the potential and risk of modifying each in the near-future. 69 70 ABBREVIATIONS AND GLOSSARY 71 2,4-DAPG: 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol. 72 Biocontrol: The use of living organisms to suppress pests. 73 C: Carbon. 74 CBC: Conservation biological control. Biocontrol that exploits natural enemies through 75 modification of the environment or management practices. 76 CMD: Cassava mosaic disease. 77 Dormancy: Period in which an organism's function is slowed, which is reversible under certain 78 conditions. 79 Endophyte: Organisms (generally fungi, bacteria, and viruses) that colonize internal plant tissue 80 without causing obvious visible symptoms. 81 HIPV: Herbivore-induced plant volatile. 82 Holobiont: Host and all of its associated partners. 83 ITS: Internal transcribed spacer. 84 Microbiome: All of the microorganisms found in a particular environment. The boundaries on 85 microbiomes are often challenging to define and depend on individual study parameters. 86 N: Nitrogen.
doi:10.1094/pbiomes-01-19-0006-w fatcat:thkkolnidzd7bk4yd4eq65eb2i