A STUDY OF THE DIAGNOSTIC AND PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF VENOUS PRESSURE OBSERVATIONS IN CARDIAC DISEASE

ADMONT H. CLARK
1915 Archives of Internal Medicine  
others. The routine measurement of venous pressure at frequent intervals as a means of following the stages of compensation or decompensation, however, has received little attention. The following investigation was undertaken with the purpose of ascertaining whether there is any diagnostic or prognostic significance in repeated venous pressure observations on cardiac cases. METHOD A number of instruments and methods have been devised by various workers to measure venous pressure. The technic
more » ... ure. The technic and relative value of the methods used until 1914 have been summarized by Austin.8 Of these, the direct method of Moritz and von Tabora of introducing a hollow needle directly into the vein, while perhaps giving a greater refinement of accuracy, would manifestly be open to serious objections in cases in which a large number of readings were made at frequent intervals. Probably the most useful clinical method was devised by Hooker9 in 1914, and it is his instrument which has been used in this investigation. As shown in Figure 1 , it consists essentially of a small glass cup (B)2 cm. in diameter and 1 cm. deep, connected with a water manometer. The chamber is sealed to the skin over a suitable vein on the back of the hand by a rim of collodion. In drying, the collodion draws the skin slightly inward, so removing possible error due to superficial tissue tension. The manometer is connected
doi:10.1001/archinte.1915.00080040083006 fatcat:d7lzpzieyjdmdcp5v7uwqd27dm