Combined influences of gradual changes in room temperature and light around dusk and dawn on circadian rhythms of core temperature, urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate and waking sensation just after rising

Masayuki Kondo, Hiromi Tokura, Tomoko Wakamura, Ki-Ja Hyun, Satoshi Tamotsu, Takeshi Morita, Tadashi Oishi
2007 Collegium Antropologicum  
The present experiment aimed at knowing how a gradual changes of room temperature (T(a)) and light in the evening and early morning could influence circadian rhythms of core temperature (T(core)), skin temperatures, urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate and waking sensation just after rising in humans. Two kinds of room environment were provided for each participant: 1) Constant room temperature (T(a)) of 27 degrees C over the 24 h and LD-rectangular light change with abrupt decreasing from 3,000
more » ... reasing from 3,000 lx to 100 lx at 1800, abrupt increasing from 0 lx to 3,000 lx at 0700. 2) Cyclic changes of T(a) and with gradual decrease from 3,000 lx to 100 lx onset at 1700 (twilight period about 2 h), with gradual increasing from 0 lx to 3,000 lx onset at 0500 (about 2 h). Main results are summarized as follows: 1) Circadian rhythms of nadir in the core temperature (T(core)) significantly advanced earlier under the influence of gradual changes of T(a) and light than no gradual changes of T(a) and light. 2) Nocturnal fall of T(core) and morning rise of T(core) were greater and quicker, respectively, under the influence of gradual changes of T(a) and light than no gradual changes of T(a) and light. 3) Urinary 6-hydroxymelatonin sulfate during nocturnal sleep was significantly greater under the influence of gradual changes of T(a) and light. 4) Waking sensation just after rising was significantly better under the influence of gradual changes of T(a) and light. We discussed these findings in terms of circadian and thermoregulatory physiology.
pmid:17847944 fatcat:uxtiusdxezexjnbtlascz72fgi