Animal model for progressive resistance exercise: a detailed description of model and its implications for basic research in exercise

Ricardo Cardoso Cassilhas, Ismair Teodoro Reis, Daniel Venâncio, Jansen Fernandes, Sérgio Tufik, Marco Túlio de Mello
2013 Motriz: Revista de Educacao Fisica  
The Several animal models have been proposed for resistance training. In addition, the results of these studies have been highly variable. Some of the studies have used negative reinforcement, electric shock or food deprivation to motivate the learning of the task. Features such as conditioning through electric shock may undermine the significance of the results or even prevent the model from being successfully executed. Due to these reasons, in this study we propose to use an adaptation of the
more » ... n adaptation of the vertical ladder climbing model for progressive resistance training in rats, albeit with a unique feature to ensure the homogeneity of the study groups: a period of adaptation to the apparatus without any negative reinforcement followed by a subsequent pairing of animals based on their ability to learn. The animals were distributed in the experimental group who were subjected to 8 weeks of a progressive resistance exercise protocol and the control group. After 8wks, the gastrocnemius, soleus, flexor digitorum longus (FDL), and plantaris muscles were removed and the cross-sectional area morphometry was obtened. The animals from experimental group showed hypertrophy [F(4, 15)=17,404, P < 0.001] for gastrocnemius [60% of hipertrophy; Control (2628,64 ± 348,50) versus Experimental (4207,77 ± 1256,52); ES=1.96; Power=0,86]; FDL [35% of hipertrophy; Control (2753,80 ± 359,54) versus Experimental (3711,84 ± 279,45); ES=2.99; Power=0.99] and plantaris [38% of hipertrophy; Control (2730,44 ± 320,56) versus Experimental (3767,30 ± 625,80); ES=2.19; Power=0.92], without modifications for soleus. All animals successfully completed the 8-week progressive resistance training program without any injuries, abandonment or death. Negative reinforcements such as electric shock were not required at any time in the experiment. In conclusion, we showed an adaptation of the previus model for progressive resistance training in rats. A period of adaptation to the apparatus without any negative reinforcement followed by a subsequent pairing of animals based on their ability to learn may be a alternative strategy for the original protocol. We also observed hypertrophy (gastrocnemius, FDL, and plantaris) showed the vality of this procolos for resistance exercise issues. The results of this study may be useful in basic/ applied neuroscience research and resistance exercise.
doi:10.1590/s1980-65742013000100018 fatcat:bjqmlpo4evfetmwsjhnzlg5hg4