On the Septuagint Text of i Samuel 20. 3 and Epistle of Jeremiah 26

John Wesley Rice
1900 American Journal of Philology  
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more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. they be tipped out of place, can they right themselves, but gifts are set before them, as for the dead.' By reading uyIre instead of ,i wrore in each case-the first as well as the second and third-the three clauses are brought into correlation. The mistake of the various scribes is the more easily accounted for, if 7rorT originally followed the first eav (e'dv Irore . . 7re'rl). The change of construction from an infinitive in the first clause to a future indicative in the second, need occasion no surprise, since such changes are common in the Septuagint. HARVARD UNIVERSITY. JOHN WESLEY RICE. NOTES. 447 if one set them upright, can they move of themselves; nor, if they be tipped out of place, can they right themselves, but gifts are set before them, as for the dead.' By reading uyIre instead of ,i wrore in each case-the first as well as the second and third-the three clauses are brought into correlation. The mistake of the various scribes is the more easily accounted for, if 7rorT originally followed the first eav (e'dv Irore . . 7re'rl). The change of construction from an infinitive in the first clause to a future indicative in the second, need occasion no surprise, since such changes are common in the Septuagint. HARVARD UNIVERSITY. JOHN WESLEY RICE. NOTES. 447 if one set them upright, can they move of themselves; nor, if they be tipped out of place, can they right themselves, but gifts are set before them, as for the dead.' By reading uyIre instead of ,i wrore in each case-the first as well as the second and third-the three clauses are brought into correlation. The mistake of the various scribes is the more easily accounted for, if 7rorT originally followed the first eav (e'dv Irore . . 7re'rl). The change of construction from an infinitive in the first clause to a future indicative in the second, need occasion no surprise, since such changes are common in the Septuagint. HARVARD UNIVERSITY. JOHN WESLEY RICE. NOTES. 447 if one set them upright, can they move of themselves; nor, if they be tipped out of place, can they right themselves, but gifts are set before them, as for the dead.' By reading uyIre instead of ,i wrore in each case-the first as well as the second and third-the three clauses are brought into correlation. The mistake of the various scribes is the more easily accounted for, if 7rorT originally followed the first eav (e'dv Irore . . 7re'rl). The change of construction from an infinitive in the first clause to a future indicative in the second, need occasion no surprise, since such changes are common in the Septuagint. HARVARD UNIVERSITY. JOHN WESLEY RICE. NOTES. 447 if one set them upright, can they move of themselves; nor, if they be tipped out of place, can they right themselves, but gifts are set before them, as for the dead.' By reading uyIre instead of ,i wrore in each case-the first as well as the second and third-the three clauses are brought into correlation. The mistake of the various scribes is the more easily accounted for, if 7rorT originally followed the first eav (e'dv Irore . . 7re'rl). The change of construction from an infinitive in the first clause to a future indicative in the second, need occasion no surprise, since such changes are common in the Septuagint.
doi:10.2307/288748 fatcat:dcnvqd4t3zhvxdbbspfsv2dtcm