Macphersonite, a new mineral from Leadhills, Scotland, and Saint-Prix, France— a polymorph of leadhillite and susannite

A. Livingstone, H. Sarp
1984 Mineralogical magazine  
Macphersonite is white, resinous to adamantine, hardness (Mohs) 2½−3, density 6.50–6.55 gm/cm3 and possesses a perfect cleavage on {010}. Optically it is negative with 2Vα 35–36°, α = 1.87, β = 2.00 and γ = 2.01, α = b, γ = c, and γ = a, dispersion r > v. Polysynthetic twinning, with either coarse or fine lamellae, is common, as are contact twins. Crystals are orthorhombic, tabular on b with a 10.37, b 23.10 and c 9.25 Å, cell volume 2215.8 Å3 and space group Pcab; Z is 8 formula units. The
more » ... formula units. The seven strongest lines in the X-ray powder pattern are 3.274 (50) 052; 3.234 (100) 251; 2.654 (90) 351,203; 2.598 (30) 172, 400; 2.310 (30) 004, 371, 0.10.0; 2.182 (30) 263; and 2.033 (30) 234, 452, 154, 1.10.2. Electronprobe-microanalysis-determined chemistry leads to the empirical formula (Pb4.08, Cu0.10, Cd0.07)Σ4.25S0.90 C2.18O10.55(OH)1.58 which yields the ideal formula Pb4(SO4)(CO3)2(OH)2 and hence macphersonite is a polymorph of leadhillite and susannite. The infrared spectrum shows basic similarities to leadhillite and susannite spectra with additional diagnostic absorption bands. Macphersonite shows an identical thermogravimetric behaviour to that of leadhillite. It is associated, in varying combinations, with leadhillite, susannite, cerussite, caledonite, pyromorphite, scotlandite, galena, and the 'lead hydroxyapatite' of Temple (1955). The new mineral mimics leadhillite.
doi:10.1180/minmag.1984.048.347.14 fatcat:vcnixgarnzfotlln3hsi4rw5ai