EPEN-13. PRIMARY EXTRADURAL SACROCOCCYGEAL SUBCUTANEOUS MYXOPAPILAR EPENDYMOMA MISDIAGNOSED AS PILONIDAL CYST IN A 7 YEAR-OLD BOY: A CASE REPORT

Regina M Navarro-Martin del Campo, Geronimo M Tavares-Macias, Luis Ivan Pozos-Ochoa, Ana L Orozco-Alvarado, Fernando Sanchez-Zubieta, Luis Angel Arredondo-Navarro
2020 Neuro-Oncology  
BACKGROUND Ependymomas occur in the brain or spinal cord and rarely as an extraspinal variety at the sacrococcygeal region, separated from the spinal cord. This rare presentation is thought to originate from a group of heterotopic ependymal cells called the coccygeal medullary vestige. There are few reports of this occurrence in children. CLINICAL CASE: A 7-year-old male presented with a history of a soft mass arising in the sacrococcygeal area 3 years earlier, diagnosed as pilonidal cyst at
more » ... ilonidal cyst at primary level and treated with surgery twice, as this mass recurred the boy was sent to our hospital, a 3rd surgery was performed, all tumoral tissue was removed, no attachment with dural space was founded, pathology revealed myxopapilar ependymoma with positivity for PS100, EMA and Vimentin. After surgery a Follow up MRI of cranium and spine showed absence of disease, no radiotherapy neither chemotherapy was implemented. He has been on surveillance from 3 years now without recurrence. CONCLUSION This report highlights the fact that pediatric ependymoma can have an extradural presentation and can be confounded with pilonidal cyst, total resection is needed to control the disease. Potential for recurrence or metastatic disease can continue 20 years from the time of primary tumor, so prolonged surveillance is important.
doi:10.1093/neuonc/noaa222.152 fatcat:2ksp5m6nfveg3h5ns7hoi7vb34