AMINO-ACID NITROGEN OF SOIL AND THE CHEMICAL GROUPS OF AMINO ACIDS IN THE HYDROLYZED SOIL AND THEIR HUMIC ACIDS

R. S. Potter, R. S. Snyder
1915 Journal of the American Chemical Society  
The minced behavior, without the addition of any form of activator. gland itself furnishes all that is necessary to activate the trypsinogen Conclusions. We have shown that it is possible to separate the true press juice from the minced pancreas, and best by aid of a powerful centrifuge operating at a speed of 3000 revolutions, or over, per minute. In the centrifugal separation the minced mass divides into three layers of distinct properties. The lower layer is largely protein, the middle layer
more » ... n, the middle layer a clear liquid, and the upper layer solid with much fat present. The liquid layer has a marked acid reaction, as distinct from that of the so-called pancreatic juice, which reaction is nearly a constant for beef and hog glands. The juice is rich in phosphates and the reaction seems to be due to acid phosphate. This reaction may be as constant and characteristic as is that of the blood and may be expressed, approximately, b y the relation, CH = 2 9 X IO-'. CHICAGO. ILL.
doi:10.1021/ja02174a035 fatcat:7ltri345pjbf5a4xdz6mz4lo5i