The Bride of Dunkerron: A Dramatic Cantata

Frederick Enoch, Henry Smart
1872 The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular  
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more » ... Circular. http://www.jstor.org This content downloaded from 128.235.251.160 on Thu, 12 Feb 2015 16:06:42 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions Sebiei%. NOVELLO, EWER AND CO. t Tibe Brtde of Dtl,)zke} rosb: a Dramatic Cantata. The Vel^se by Frederick Enoch. The Music by Henry Smart. ( No+s that Mr. Henry Smart's beautiful Cantata is published < in the octavo edition, there may be some hope of its beincr ] appreciated at its real worth * for, whatever may be the merit 1 of a work, its appearance only in an expensive form efl ectually prevents its diffusion amongst the general public. Originally ' produced at the Birmingham Bestival of 1864, where its i success was most decisive, it has, from the cause we have : stated, been but rarely heard since, although the music-is ] mTell known to the artistic minority, and one at least of its J choruses, " Hail to thee, hail to thee, chilcl of the earth," : has made its way with vocal amateurs, apart ftom the: Cantata. The many who nvill now examine this composi-tioIl for the first time, cannot fail to be struck with the excellence of several of the pieces, amongst which may be especially mentioned the chorus of Storm-spirits, " Down thro' the deep," the duet for Dunkerron and the Seamaiden, " I heard thy voice," the trio, " Where art thou son of at mortal race ? " and the the Sea-maiden's air, " Our holne shall be on this bright isle," all of which are really charming specimens of Mr. Smart's graceful and melodious style. Much of the effect of the score is reflectecl in the pianoforte part, which is most carefully arranged throughout, the " Intermezzo " being also published for four hands. The Cantata is in every respect admirably adapted for drawing-room performance, for there is a refinement about both the story and the music which must recommend it to every listener * and amateur singers will be delighted with the purity of the vocal writing. The work has evidently been e}cellently revised, and is presented to the public in its new shape without a fault. Processioazal Uyntn, " The Svord of the Lox d." The words by Mrs. John Turner * the Music composed by C. Warwick Jordan, Mus. Bac., Oson. THE verses before us recount in brief the story of Gideon and apply in metaphor to the Christian Church. They are spirited, and as clear as their symbolical nature would allow them to be. They have also the merit (rare in poems which ale used for hymns) of symmetrical rhythm h * is,the syliables and their accentuation fit the music equally rell in every stanza. They are set to a racy tune, somewhat inclined to vulgarity perhaps, but full of aniIns,tiOn. There is a prelude for the organ; the tune is for soices in unison throughout, and the alternate stanzas are accompanied the one, note against note, with the tune, the other with an entirely free organ part, which sometimes leaves the voices alone, and, against a firm and numerous choir, will havo a capital effect. The composer apparently has no prejudice at,ainst false relation and in this respect resemlules rather the musicians of the 17th century than of the 19th * but, like the duelling habits of our forefathers, a musical practice of an older time has grown to be highly objectionable in our own, and there is more temerity than taste in its present use. Words and notes both savour of the parade more than of the cloister; and if they suit the name of the Church Militant, it is doubtful if they inculcate the Gospel of Peace. The hymn was written for the celebration of the annual festival of the English Church Union held in the churches <f St. Stephen, Lewisham, and St. Lawrence, Jewry, in June 1869; and its sale has reached the second thousand. PsocesstoezaZ Xymn, for Feasts of Apostles, " T1ze Ring of ESab,tts;" 71(I OfTertor.y Sentence, " Me that Sowet/-b." By C. Warwick Jordan, Mus. Bac., Oson. THE verses of this hymn are from the same hand as the foregoing; but, with the same metrical fuency, they have a higher and purer poetical character. So, too, the music is in a more religious vein, and if less stirring, it is more devotional. The piece was written for the dedication festival of St. Michael's Church at Hulme, near Manchester where its annual performance-it was given there on the 29th of September and at the preparatory festival on the 26th, tlais year-shows it to be an established favourite. The Offertory Sentence is an allowable application of the text to the occasion of harvest, the temporal allusion illustrating, and so strengthening, the spiritual metaphor. The music is smooth, and appropriate, in its simplicity, to the .season and circumstances for which it vzas designed. T}le composer has a feelillg for harmony and a melodious IltLency. Sebiei%. NOVELLO, EWER AND CO. t Tibe Brtde of Dtl,)zke} rosb: a Dramatic Cantata. The Vel^se by Frederick Enoch. The Music by Henry Smart. ( No+s that Mr. Henry Smart's beautiful Cantata is published < in the octavo edition, there may be some hope of its beincr ] appreciated at its real worth * for, whatever may be the merit 1 of a work, its appearance only in an expensive form efl ectually prevents its diffusion amongst the general public. Originally ' produced at the Birmingham Bestival of 1864, where its i success was most decisive, it has, from the cause we have : stated, been but rarely heard since, although the music-is ] mTell known to the artistic minority, and one at least of its J choruses, " Hail to thee, hail to thee, chilcl of the earth," : has made its way with vocal amateurs, apart ftom the: Cantata. The many who nvill now examine this composi-tioIl for the first time, cannot fail to be struck with the excellence of several of the pieces, amongst which may be especially mentioned the chorus of Storm-spirits, " Down thro' the deep," the duet for Dunkerron and the Seamaiden, " I heard thy voice," the trio, " Where art thou son of at mortal race ? " and the the Sea-maiden's air, " Our holne shall be on this bright isle," all of which are really charming specimens of Mr. Smart's graceful and melodious style. Much of the effect of the score is reflectecl in the pianoforte part, which is most carefully arranged throughout, the " Intermezzo " being also published for four hands. The Cantata is in every respect admirably adapted for drawing-room performance, for there is a refinement about both the story and the music which must recommend it to every listener * and amateur singers will be delighted with the purity of the vocal writing. The work has evidently been e}cellently revised, and is presented to the public in its new shape without a fault. Processioazal Uyntn, " The Svord of the Lox d." The words by Mrs. John Turner * the Music composed by C. Warwick Jordan, Mus. Bac., Oson. THE verses before us recount in brief the story of Gideon and apply in metaphor to the Christian Church. They are spirited, and as clear as their symbolical nature would allow them to be. They have also the merit (rare in poems which ale used for hymns) of symmetrical rhythm h * is,the syliables and their accentuation fit the music equally rell in every stanza. They are set to a racy tune, somewhat inclined to vulgarity perhaps, but full of aniIns,tiOn. There is a prelude for the organ; the tune is for soices in unison throughout, and the alternate stanzas are accompanied the one, note against note, with the tune, the other with an entirely free organ part, which sometimes leaves the voices alone, and, against a firm and numerous choir, will havo a capital effect. The composer apparently has no prejudice at,ainst false relation and in this respect resemlules rather the musicians of the 17th century than of the 19th * but, like the duelling habits of our forefathers, a musical practice of an older time has grown to be highly objectionable in our own, and there is more temerity than taste in its present use. Words and notes both savour of the parade more than of the cloister; and if they suit the name of the Church Militant, it is doubtful if they inculcate the Gospel of Peace. The hymn was written for the celebration of the annual festival of the English Church Union held in the churches <f St. Stephen, Lewisham, and St. Lawrence, Jewry, in June 1869; and its sale has reached the second thousand.
doi:10.2307/3355377 fatcat:lopad6ns2rdq3dq6og6p7w6faq