Calculation of Derived Investigation Levels for Uranium Intake
우라늄 섭취의 유도조사준위 산출

Na-Rae Lee, Seung-Jae Han, Kun-Woo Cho, Kyu-Hwan Jeong, Dong-Myung Lee
2013 Journal of Radiation Protection and Research  
Derived Investigation levels(DILs) were calculated to protect the workers from the effects of both radiological hazard and chemical toxicity by uranium intake. Investigation Levels(ILs) of committed effective dose of 2 mSv y -1 -6 mSv y -1 and uranium concentration of 0.3 ㎍ g -1 in kidney, based on Korean Nuclaer Safety Act, Korean Occupational Safety and Health Act and current scientific studies of uranium intake were assumed. DILs of radiological hazard and chemical toxicity were then
more » ... y were then calculated based on the concentration of uranium in air of workplace, the lung monitoring and urine analysis, respectively. As a result, in case of the nuclear fuel fabrication plant where 3.5% enriched uranium is handled, derived investigation level(DIL) for the control of the concentration of uranium in the air of workplace assumed with 15-min acute inhalation was 0.6 mg m -3 for all types of uranium. DILs for the control of the average concentration of uranium in air of workplace, assuming an 8-hour workday, were 15.21 ㎍ m -3 of Type F uranium, 0.41-1.23 Bq m -3 and 0.13-0.39 Bq m -3 for Type M and Type S uranium, respectively. DILs for the lung monitoring assumed with a period of 6-month interval were 0.37-1.11 Bq and 0.39-1.17 Bq in acute and chronic inhalation for Type M, respectively and 0.30-0.91 Bq and 0.19-0.57 Bq in acute and chronic inhalation for Type S, respectively. Since a detection limit of typical germanium detector for the measurement of 235 U activity is 4 Bq, DILs calculated for the lung monitoring were not appropriate. DILs for urine analysis, for which an interval was assumed to be 1 month, were 14.57 ㎍ L -1 based on chemical toxicity after acute inhalation. In addition, acute and chronic inhalation of Type M were calculated 2.85-8.58 ㎍ L -1 and 1.09-3.27 ㎍ L -1 based on the radiological hazard, respectively.
doi:10.14407/jrp.2013.38.2.068 fatcat:wbbf56ta7zdr3fpnrak3b2w54m