The effect of dynamic assessment on complexity, accuracy, and fluency in EFL learners' oral production

Elham Ebrahimi
2015 International Journal of Research Studies in Language Learning  
The present study aimed to investigate the effect of dynamic assessment on complexity, accuracy and fluency (CAF) in EFL learners' oral production. Participants were 44 intermediate; they were all female and aged from 11 to 15 in a language institute in Isfahan. They were divided into two experimental and control groups: The experimental group received the treatment (dynamic assessment/DA), and the control group received regular instruction under institute's normal situation. Findings revealed
more » ... Findings revealed that the implementation of DA promoted more complex and accurate oral productions while it did not have any effect on the fluency of learners' oral productions. In addition, results manifested strong positive correlations between measures of CAF and learners' oral proficiency scores. Finally, the factor analysis revealed that there were three main factors (CAF) underlying the six measures used in the present study. The results of this study have a number of implications for EFL practitioners and teachers as well. The effect of dynamic assessment on complexity, accuracy, and fluency in EFL learners' oral production International Journal of Research Studies in Language Learning 109 Studies of DA This section has introduced briefly some studies which have been done in DA area to illustrate the point of present study. It has been begun by reviewing two dynamic-like assessment studies in a L2 context. First, Schneider and Ganschow (2000) suggest that awareness of metalinguistic strategies could be especially helpful for learners with dyslexia by using interaction. And second, Grigorenko, Sternberg, and Ehrman (2000) developed a formal testing instrument to measure learners' ability to deal with novel problems. As it mentioned earlier, intervention model is one of the general model of DA. Carlson and Wiedl have proposed two intervention techniques: They support interrupting test administration as essential to provide feedback and elicit verbalization rather than introducing a separate intervention phase. Another study with the same ground, interventionist approach to DA, has been carried by Kozulin and Garb. Due to the large numbers of adult immigrants to Israel who are included their research, Kozulin and his colleagues have relied upon an interventionist format in which teaching is sandwiched between a static pretest and post-test. They define the difference between the learners' pre-and post-test scores and made this difference as low, intermediate and high, and instructional recommendations for each group.
doi:10.5861/ijrsll.2015.982 fatcat:ot3g7iybrbeuhc72yu4hqc7odq