Cardiovascular pathology: level of creation and risk factors
Уровень образования и факторы риска кардиоваскулярной патологии

D.P. Tsygankova, Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Disease, E.D. Bazdyrev, A.S. Agienko, E.V. Indukaeva, G.V. Artamonova, O.L. Barbarash, Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Disease, Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Disease, Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Disease, Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Disease, Research Institute for Complex Issues of Cardiovascular Disease
2020 Siberian medical review  
The aim of the research is to assess the prevalence of traditional and behavioral risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) among urban and rural residents of large industrial Siberian region, depending on education level. Material and methods. The study included 1600 people, aged 35-70, who are permanent residents of Kemerovo City and Kemerovo region. Considering the living conditions, two groups were formed. The first group included 1109 (69.3%) respondents living in the city and 491
more » ... he city and 491 (30.7%) respondents from countryside. The study analyzed such traditional and behavioral risk factors for CVD as body mass index (BMI), glucose levels, lipid metabolism (total cholesterol, lipoprotein cholesterol of high and low density (LCLD), triglycerides), blood pressure, tobacco and alcohol consumption, etc. According to education level, the respondents were subdivided into the following categories: people with school education (primary education, secondary education), people with secondary specialized education (vocational school, technical schools, colleges) and people with higher education (higher educational institution). Results. Average BMI values (30.3 (26.1; 34.6) versus 28.4 (24.9; 32.3)) kg / m2, p<0.001), systolic (135 (121.5; 151.0 ) versus 131.5 (119.0; 147.0)) mm Hg, p = 0.005) and diastolic blood pressure (89 (80.5; 97.5) versus 86.5 (78.0; 95, 0)) mm Hg, p<0.001), LCLD (3.7 (2.9; 4.4) versus 3.5 (2.8; 4.2)) mmol / L, p = 0.008) were statistically significantly higher among people living in rural areas than among urban citizens. Higher education was associated with BMI decrease by 1.2 kg / m2 (p = 0.002), systolic blood pressure by 3.2 mm Hg (p = 0.002), and diastolic blood pressure by 2.1 mm Hg (p = 0.001). Moreover, people with such education were characterized by a decreased risk not only of obesity (OR = 0.6, 95% CI [0.5-0.8], p <0.001), but also of arterial hypertension (OR = 0.7 , 95% CI [0.5-1.0], p <0.001), hypertriglyceridemia (OR = 0.72, CI [0.53-0.98], p = 0.037), as well as by an increased risk of developing high level of LDL (OR = 1.36, CI [1.02-1.82], p = 0.038). When conducting a logistic regression analysis, after leveling the influence of gender and age, it was found that smoking was associated with lack of higher education (OR = 0.6, 95% CI: 0.48-0.79, p <0.001). Conclusion. Regardless of place of residence, maximum prevalence of obesity, arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus was observed among people with secondary vocational education, while alcohol consumption was observed among people with higher education. Higher education was associated with a reduced risk of obesity, arterial hypertension, hypertriglyceridemia, smoking, and an increased risk of developing high levels of low-density lipoprotein
doi:10.20333/2500136-2020-5-70-76 fatcat:xpoc2u3lvnhyddqb6astsnvwau