Peer Review #1 of "Archosauriform footprints in the Lower Triassic of Western Alps and their role in understanding the effects of the Permian-Triassic hyperthermal (v0.1)" [peer_review]

H Francischini
2020 unpublished
The most accepted killing model for the Permian-Triassic mass extinction (PTME) postulates that massive volcanic eruption (i.e. the Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province) led to geologically rapid global warming, acid rain and ocean anoxia. On land, habitable zones were drastically reduced, due to the combined effects of heating, drought and acid rains. This hyperthermal had severe effects also on the paleobiogeography of several groups of organisms. Among those, the tetrapods, whose
more » ... s, whose geographical distribution across the end-Permian mass extinction (EPME) was the subject of controversy of a number of recent papers. We here describe and interpret a new Early Triassic (?Olenekian) archosauriform track assemblage from the Gardetta Plateau (Briançonnais, Western Alps, Italy) which, at the Permian-Triassic boundary, was placed at about 11° North. The tracks, both arranged in trackways and documented by single, well-preserved imprints, are assigned to Isochirotherium gardettensis ichnosp. nov., and are here interpreted as produced by a non-archosaurian archosauriform (erytrosuchid?) trackmaker. This new discovery provides further evidence for the presence of archosauriformes at low latitudes during the Early Triassic epoch, supporting a model in which the PTME did not completely vacate low-latitude lands from tetrapods that therefore would have been able to cope with the extreme hot temperatures of Pangaea mainland. PeerJ reviewing PDF | (Manuscript to be reviewed 23 The most accepted killing model for the Permian-Triassic mass extinction (PTME) postulates 24 that massive volcanic eruption (i.e. the Siberian Traps Large Igneous Province) led to 25 geologically rapid global warming, acid rain and ocean anoxia. On land, habitable zones were 26 drastically reduced, due to the combined effects of heating, drought and acid rains. This 27 hyperthermal had severe effects also on the paleobiogeography of several groups of organisms. 28 Among those, the tetrapods, whose geographical distribution across the end-Permian mass 29 extinction (EPME) was the subject of controversy of a number of recent papers. We here 30 describe and interpret a new Early Triassic (?Olenekian) archosauriform track assemblage from 31 the Gardetta Plateau (Briançonnais, Western Alps, Italy) which, at the Permian-Triassic 32 boundary, was placed at about 11° North. The tracks, both arranged in trackways and 33 documented by single, well-preserved imprints, are assigned to Isochirotherium gardettensis 34 ichnosp. nov., and are here interpreted as produced by a non-archosaurian archosauriform 35 (erytrosuchid?) trackmaker. This new discovery provides further evidence for the presence of 36 archosauriformes at low latitudes during the Early Triassic epoch, supporting a model in which 37 the PTME did not completely vacate low-latitude lands from tetrapods that therefore would have 38 been able to cope with the extreme hot temperatures of Pangaea mainland.
doi:10.7287/peerj.10522v0.1/reviews/1 fatcat:vvdpqgzzpvbahgs3vb22yhgymi