Integrative Analysis of Energy Partition Patterns and Plasma Metabolomics Profiles of Modern Growing Pigs Raised at Different Ambient Temperatures

Shuai Zhang, Hang Gao, Xiongkun Yuan, Junjun Wang, Jianjun Zang
2020 Animals  
This study explores the energy partition patterns of modern growing pigs at 25 kg and 65 kg raised at gradient-ambient temperatures. It also investigates the underlying changes in plasma under such conditions, based on the integrative analysis of indirect calorimetry and non-target metabolomics profiling. Thirty-six barrows with initial BW of 26.4 ± 1.9 kg and 24 barrows with initial BW of 64.2 ± 3.1 kg were successively allotted to six respiration chambers with ambient temperatures set as 18
more » ... ratures set as 18 °C, 21 °C, 23 °C, 27 °C, 30 °C, and 32 °C, and four respiration chambers with ambient temperatures set as 18 °C, 23 °C, 27 °C, and 32 °C, respectively. Each pig was kept in an individual metabolic crate and consumed feed ad libitum, then transferred into the respiration chamber after a 7-day adaptation period for 5-day indirect calorimetry assay and 1-day fasting. As the ambient temperature increased from 18 °C to 32 °C, the voluntary feed intake, metabolizable energy intake, nitrogen intake, and retention, total heat production, and energy retention as a protein of growing pigs at 25 kg and 65 kg all linearly decreased (p < 0.05), with greater coefficients of variation for pigs at 65 kg when temperatures changed from 18 °C to 32 °C. The cortisol and thyroid hormone levels in the plasma of 25 kg pigs linearly decreased as the ambient temperature increased from 18 °C to 32 °C (p < 0.05), and 13 compounds were identified through metabolomics analysis, including up-regulated metabolites involved in fatty acid metabolism, such as adrenic acid and down-regulated metabolites involved in amino acid metabolism, such as spermidine at 32 °C. These results suggested that modern growing pigs at heavier bodyweight were more sensitive to high temperatures on energy intake and partition. Most of the identified metabolites altered at high ambient temperatures are associated with suppressed fatty acid oxidation and elevated lipogenesis and protein degradation.
doi:10.3390/ani10111953 pmid:33114083 fatcat:44qo33v4k5fqflq65seib6quqm