The Edict of Tolerance of Louis XVI. (1787) and Its American Promoters

Gaston Bonet-Maury
1899 The American Journal of Theology  
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more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF THEOLOGY THE AMERICAN JOURNAL OF THEOLOGY Ahikar, we find no such expression, but only the expression " king of the Assyrians ;" nor do we find the country spoken of, at least in the Vatican text, by the curious double title ? When, however, we begin to examine the Sinaitic text, we find traces of the very same expression; thus: Tob. I4:4, KaL a7raVTrjfE'L 4rt 'A Op Kal Ntvcv Tob. I4: I4, iv 7ra'crv oL ETOlr'Cv e7 TOVS VlOVs NLvEV? KaL AOovpEla, which shows that the Sinaitic text is derived from one which described the empire as it is described in Ahikar. Probably this is also the explanation of the peculiar Vatican reading of Tob. 14:4, r-v a(rwXoav NLVc v rj[V aX ao-Uev NaCPovXo8ovooop ] Kal 'Aorvpo', where 'Aov'-rpo, looks very like a corruption of 'A6Op or 'AOvpeta., and the bracketed words are either a gloss or a displacement. Next turn to Tob. 14:4 and observe how, in the context, the Sinaitic text has preserved another original trait in the expression: T-pAr/aTL TO) 0EoV iTrL NLvevV, a iXa'Xrlaev Naov/L, nTL radvTa EfraaL Kal &TravTVjT'eL icrT 'AOjp Kai NLVcVy. It has long been recognized that Naov'p and not'Iwyava is the true reading in this place. The Sinaitic, then, is the better text, and it either represents the original Semitic more closely than does the Vatican text, or has been corrected from the original Semitic. But what Semitic text was it ? Hebrew or Aramaic ? There can only be one answer in view of the forms 'AOip and 'AOovpdea. They are not Hebrew, but Aramaic. We have thus arrived at a fairly conclusive demonstration of the superiority of the Sinaitic Tobit, and of the existence in it of elements derived from the Aramaic. And we have obtained further evidence of the close literary parallelism of the two stories, Ahikar and Tobit. THE EDICT OF TOLERANCE OF LOUIS XVI. (1787) AND ITS AMERICAN PROMOTERS. THE war of the Camisards had shown that the Huguenots in France were unconquerable by brute force. The most powerful king of Europe must use persuasion and bribery in order to bring about the pacification of the Cevenol mountaineers. Besides, Antoine Court, Benjamin du Plan, Jacques Roger, and their coadjutors in the work of the restoration of the Protestant church had proved by their steadfastness that the fear of the galleys, or even of death, could never force Ahikar, we find no such expression, but only the expression " king of the Assyrians ;" nor do we find the country spoken of, at least in the Vatican text, by the curious double title ? When, however, we begin to examine the Sinaitic text, we find traces of the very same expression; thus: Tob. I4:4, KaL a7raVTrjfE'L 4rt 'A Op Kal Ntvcv Tob. I4: I4, iv 7ra'crv oL ETOlr'Cv e7 TOVS VlOVs NLvEV? KaL AOovpEla, which shows that the Sinaitic text is derived from one which described the empire as it is described in Ahikar. Probably this is also the explanation of the peculiar Vatican reading of Tob. 14:4, r-v a(rwXoav NLVc v rj[V aX ao-Uev NaCPovXo8ovooop ] Kal 'Aorvpo', where 'Aov'-rpo, looks very like a corruption of 'A6Op or 'AOvpeta., and the bracketed words are either a gloss or a displacement. Next turn to Tob. 14:4 and observe how, in the context, the Sinaitic text has preserved another original trait in the expression: T-pAr/aTL TO) 0EoV iTrL NLvevV, a iXa'Xrlaev Naov/L, nTL radvTa EfraaL Kal &TravTVjT'eL icrT 'AOjp Kai NLVcVy. It has long been recognized that Naov'p and not'Iwyava is the true reading in this place. The Sinaitic, then, is the better text, and it either represents the original Semitic more closely than does the Vatican text, or has been corrected from the original Semitic. But what Semitic text was it ? Hebrew or Aramaic ? There can only be one answer in view of the forms 'AOip and 'AOovpdea. They are not Hebrew, but Aramaic. We have thus arrived at a fairly conclusive demonstration of the superiority of the Sinaitic Tobit, and of the existence in it of elements derived from the Aramaic. And we have obtained further evidence of the close literary parallelism of the two stories, Ahikar and Tobit. THE EDICT OF TOLERANCE OF LOUIS XVI. (1787) AND ITS AMERICAN PROMOTERS. THE war of the Camisards had shown that the Huguenots in France were unconquerable by brute force. The most powerful king of Europe must use persuasion and bribery in order to bring about the pacification of the Cevenol mountaineers. Besides, Antoine Court, Benjamin du Plan, Jacques Roger, and their coadjutors in the work of the restoration of the Protestant church had proved by their steadfastness that the fear of the galleys, or even of death, could never force
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