Sweetest Saviour. Dialogue

George Herbert, C. A. Macirone
1873 The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular  
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more » ... . The setting of the Doxology is the same in the two compositions, forming a link to unite them into one, with the same good effect that the device elsewhere produces.. Our final remark must be that we look with pleasure for more music from the same hand. La FOntAiB6. Morceau de Salon pollr Piano. L'EtOilC SROuge Polka brillante, pour le Piano. Le BOB Betoz4r. Caprice Caracteristique pour le Piano. Par M. Lafuente TH]3 first of these pieces is decidedly the most " character;stic " of the three, although the last is the only one so termed by the composer. The light groups of demisemiquavers which form a marked feature in the composition arld are presumed to represent the aquatic element, are effective, althoTlgh we can hardly reconcile ourselves to the fifths between bass and treble (G, D,-A, E) in the third bar of page 3. The principal therne is rather tame, n7hen first given out; and we do not admire the break in the demisemiquaver passages in the last few bars * lDut pianists with a light finger will have ample opportunity for the display of their touch in the course of the piece, and the subject is sufficiently graceful to command attention. " L'Etoile Rouffle " is a spirited Polka, but scarcely lnore hrilliant than the hundreds with which we are alre&dy familiar. " Le Bon Retour " is merely a theme with sariation>, none of which will severely tas: the powers of the performer. Surely it is time that some individuality should be stamped upon the works which are submittecl for reviem7; pieces nlerely cut to the modern pattern may satisfy the majority of the music-buying public, but when they are sent for critical judgment what new set of words can be invented to describe their negative virtues ? The Songs of Wcbles. With accompaniments for the Piano or Harp. 3£ dited by John Thom as . Part 2. THAT Welsh musin has latterly engaged a large portion of public attention is in a great measure owing to the zealolls and patriotic e2rertions of Mr. John Thomas and Mr. Brinlcy Richards, both of whom have thrown their heart into the movement, and being artists of the highest standing, practically demonstrated the excessive beauty of the melodies, which are as truly national and as dear to the natives of the Principality as are the traditional tunes of any other part of the world. The work before us is issued xnonthly, and will be completed in about twelve parts. It 1S announced as a re-publication of the collections of the late ffohn Parry and George Thomson, with the addition of other melodies which have not hitherto appeared in a vocal form. In some cases the same air is given with different rords and accompaniments, and an interesting feature in t-he publication is the addition of historical notes in connection with the songs. Under the careflll supervision of Mr. John Thomas, it is almost unnecessary to say that the music is most accurately printed; and to all lovers of the songs of Wales we cannot too cordially commencl a s-ork which is evidently a labour of love to its editor. AUGENEBW AND GO. "Nof unfo us, O I,ord, ot unto z/,s." An Anthem for Four Voices. By Richard Payne. THIS Anthem is melodious, and for the most part vocal hut in one place at least it demands extraordinary coznpass in the basses, where it goes to Dt below the staff. Its variety consists more in chauge of key than change of matter. It has some good contrasts of picl,no and forte by which, quite as much as by other means, it svill make a plea8ing effect. It merits and is likely to obtain a certain kind of popularity; amd it says something for the progress of mtRSic in the Congregational Church that such a piece should be written for its use by one of its orgaWnists. JEFFERYS AND CO. On beds of enow (Ellen's Tear). Poetry by Thomas Mre. Sleeptezg Flozcers. Written by Rea,. Composed by iBerthold Tours. MR. Touas has thoroughly sustained his reputation as a vocal writer in both these songs. Moore's words are set xvith a sympathetic feeling which fully justifies the composer in selecting the verses of a true poet. The commencement ln a minor, iS well contra6ted with the themes in the dominant and tonic lllajor, the triplet aecompaniment? on the return to the original time, being especially efiective " Sleeping Flowers " is perhaps even more popular in a11 keys, the least desirable, into which the plan of a piece can proceed, and its ill effect here is proof sllfficient of its undesirability. The setting of the Doxology is the same in the two compositions, forming a link to unite them into one, with the same good effect that the device elsewhere produces.. Our final remark must be that we look with pleasure for more music from the same hand. La FOntAiB6. Morceau de Salon pollr Piano. L'EtOilC SROuge Polka brillante, pour le Piano. Le BOB Betoz4r. Caprice Caracteristique pour le Piano. Par M. Lafuente TH]3 first of these pieces is decidedly the most " character;stic " of the three, although the last is the only one so termed by the composer. The light groups of demisemiquavers which form a marked feature in the composition arld are presumed to represent the aquatic element, are effective, althoTlgh we can hardly reconcile ourselves to the fifths between bass and treble (G, D,-A, E) in the third bar of page 3. The principal therne is rather tame, n7hen first given out; and we do not admire the break in the demisemiquaver passages in the last few bars * lDut pianists with a light finger will have ample opportunity for the display of their touch in the course of the piece, and the subject is sufficiently graceful to command attention. " L'Etoile Rouffle " is a spirited Polka, but scarcely lnore hrilliant than the hundreds with which we are alre&dy familiar. " Le Bon Retour " is merely a theme with sariation>, none of which will severely tas: the powers of the performer. Surely it is time that some individuality should be stamped upon the works which are submittecl for reviem7; pieces nlerely cut to the modern pattern may satisfy the majority of the music-buying public, but when they are sent for critical judgment what new set of words can be invented to describe their negative virtues ? The Songs of Wcbles. With accompaniments for the Piano or Harp. 3£ dited by John Thom as . Part 2. THAT Welsh musin has latterly engaged a large portion of public attention is in a great measure owing to the zealolls and patriotic e2rertions of Mr. John Thomas and Mr. Brinlcy Richards, both of whom have thrown their heart into the movement, and being artists of the highest standing, practically demonstrated the excessive beauty of the melodies, which are as truly national and as dear to the natives of the Principality as are the traditional tunes of any other part of the world. The work before us is issued xnonthly, and will be completed in about twelve parts. It 1S announced as a re-publication of the collections of the late ffohn Parry and George Thomson, with the addition of other melodies which have not hitherto appeared in a vocal form. In some cases the same air is given with different rords and accompaniments, and an interesting feature in t-he publication is the addition of historical notes in connection with the songs. Under the careflll supervision of Mr. John Thomas, it is almost unnecessary to say that the music is most accurately printed; and to all lovers of the songs of Wales we cannot too cordially commencl a s-ork which is evidently a labour of love to its editor. IN THE QUEEN'S BENCH.-WESTWIINSTER SESSIONS HOUYSE, ZISt FlD1l6, I873. (Trawtsc7-ipt fro7t; AIessrs. MIartezt asscl AIeretlith's Showths;£ Notes.} Mr. ROSCOE opened the pleadings. Mr. Serjeant BALLANTINE: May it please your Lordship, (;entlemen of the Jury, I re,ffret very unfeignedly having the duty cast upon me of stating this case and conducting it against the defendant. I cannot help thinking that it is extremely ill-advisSed on his part to appear here at all, and also I think that before this case is ended he will join in the regret that I have expressed that it has ever been brought into Court. As far, honvever, as those xvhom I represent are concerned, I think you vsill agree *vith me that there was an absolute IN THE QUEEN'S BENCH.-WESTWIINSTER SESSIONS HOUYSE, ZISt FlD1l6, I873. (Trawtsc7-ipt fro7t; AIessrs. MIartezt asscl AIeretlith's Showths;£ Notes.} Mr. ROSCOE opened the pleadings. Mr. Serjeant BALLANTINE: May it please your Lordship, (;entlemen of the Jury, I re,ffret very unfeignedly having the duty cast upon me of stating this case and conducting it against the defendant. I cannot help thinking that it is extremely ill-advisSed on his part to appear here at all, and also I think that before this case is ended he will join in the regret that I have expressed that it has ever been brought into Court. As far, honvever, as those xvhom I represent are concerned, I think you vsill agree *vith me that there was an absolute IN THE QUEEN'S BENCH.-WESTWIINSTER SESSIONS HOUYSE, ZISt FlD1l6, I873. (Trawtsc7-ipt fro7t; AIessrs. MIartezt asscl AIeretlith's Showths;£ Notes.} Mr. ROSCOE opened the pleadings. Mr. Serjeant BALLANTINE: May it please your Lordship, (;entlemen of the Jury, I re,ffret very unfeignedly having the duty cast upon me of stating this case and conducting it against the defendant. I cannot help thinking that it is extremely ill-advisSed on his part to appear here at all, and also I think that before this case is ended he will join in the regret that I have expressed that it has ever been brought into Court. As far, honvever, as those xvhom I represent are concerned, I think you vsill agree *vith me that there was an absolute IN THE QUEEN'S BENCH.-WESTWIINSTER SESSIONS HOUYSE, ZISt FlD1l6, I873. (Trawtsc7-ipt fro7t; AIessrs. MIartezt asscl AIeretlith's Showths;£ Notes.} Mr. ROSCOE opened the pleadings. Mr. Serjeant BALLANTINE: May it please your Lordship, (;entlemen of the Jury, I re,ffret very unfeignedly having the duty cast upon me of stating this case and conducting it against the defendant. I cannot help thinking that it is extremely ill-advisSed on his part to appear here at all, and also I think that before this case is ended he will join in the regret that I have expressed that it has ever been brought into Court. As far, honvever, as those xvhom I represent are concerned, I think you vsill agree *vith me that there was an absolute IN THE QUEEN'S BENCH.-WESTWIINSTER SESSIONS HOUYSE, ZISt FlD1l6, I873. (Trawtsc7-ipt fro7t; AIessrs. MIartezt asscl AIeretlith's Showths;£ Notes.} Mr. ROSCOE opened the pleadings. Mr. Serjeant BALLANTINE: May it please your Lordship, (;entlemen of the Jury, I re,ffret very unfeignedly having the duty cast upon me of stating this case and conducting it against the defendant. I cannot help thinking that it is extremely ill-advisSed on his part to appear here at all, and also I think that before this case is ended he will join in the regret that I have expressed that it has ever been brought into Court. As far, honvever, as those xvhom I represent are concerned, I think you vsill agree *vith me that there was an absolute IN THE QUEEN'S BENCH.-WESTWIINSTER SESSIONS HOUYSE, ZISt FlD1l6, I873. (Trawtsc7-ipt fro7t; AIessrs. MIartezt asscl AIeretlith's Showths;£ Notes.} Mr. ROSCOE opened the pleadings. Mr. Serjeant BALLANTINE: May it please your Lordship, (;entlemen of the Jury, I re,ffret very unfeignedly having the duty cast upon me of stating this case and conducting it against the defendant. I cannot help thinking that it is extremely ill-advisSed on his part to appear here at all, and also I think that before this case is ended he will join in the regret that I have expressed that it has ever been brought into Court. As far, honvever, as those xvhom I represent are concerned, I think you vsill agree *vith me that there was an absolute IN THE QUEEN'S BENCH.-WESTWIINSTER SESSIONS HOUYSE, ZISt FlD1l6, I873.
doi:10.2307/3353705 fatcat:ejhvngt6pbanfizin3y7dqznxi