Sleep Disorders in Children with Central Nervous System Tumors

Melissa Maloney, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, 4650 Sunset Blvd. Mailstop #83, Los Angeles, CA 90027-6016, USA, Katherine Lewinter, Sally Davidson Ward, Iris Perez, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, 4650 Sunset Blvd. Mailstop #83, Los Angeles, CA 90027-6016, USA, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, 4650 Sunset Blvd. Mailstop #83, Los Angeles, CA 90027-6016, USA, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-9034, USA, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Division of Pediatric Pulmonology and Sleep Medicine, 4650 Sunset Blvd. Mailstop #83, Los Angeles, CA 90027-6016, USA, Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90089-9034, USA
2018 OBM Neurobiology  
Sleep complaints are common in pediatric patients with central nervous system (CNS) tumors. These problems may result from disruption of normal homeostatic, circadian, neuroendocrine, and cardiorespiratory pathways and vary by tumor location and treatment received. Children with tumors within the hypothalamus and surrounding regions are prone to excessive daytime sleepiness. Sleep-related breathing disorders, especially those involving abnormal control of breathing, may occur in patients with
more » ... mors of the brainstem and posterior fossa. Maintaining a high index of suspicion for sleep disorders in children with CNS tumors is essential for early recognition and treatment. In this article, we will review the various sleep problems reported in pediatric brain tumor survivors, explore underlying neurobiological mechanisms, and discuss approaches to screening and diagnosis.
doi:10.21926/obm.neurobiol.1804017 fatcat:ppk6dsg5zne3rcxsyjdlmzqonm