Volume 20 Number 9 September 2014 Case Report Metastatic laryngeal carcinoma mimicking eruptive keratoacanthomas: report of keratoacanthoma-like cutaneous metastases in a radiation port

Dana Ellis, Ryan Riahi, Andrea Murina, Philip Cohen
unpublished
Metastatic skin lesions from a primary squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck have only been reported in 1%-2% of these patients. Hence, skin metastases from laryngeal carcinoma are uncommon. Also, cutaneous metastases clinically presenting as a keratoacanthoma are rare. We describe cutaneous metastases in a radiation port clinically mimicking eruptive keratoacanthomas. Using the PubMed database, an extensive literature search was performed using the keywords cancer, carcinoma,
more » ... rcinoma, keratoacanthoma, laryngeal, metastases, metastasis, metastatic, mimicking, port, radiation, radiotherapy, radiation, skin, visceral. We were able to summarize the features of patients with keratoacanthoma-like cutaneous metastases and discuss radiation port cutaneous metastases. Cutaneous metastases can be the initial manifestation of a previously undiagnosed malignancy or can present in a patient with an established diagnosis of cancer. Our patient not only developed skin metastases that mimicked eruptive keratoacanthomas, but to the best of our knowledge, is the first individual to develop radiation port cutaneous metastasis from a primary laryngeal carcinoma. The development of cutaneous metastases in an area of skin that has been treated with radiation therapy may result from the treatment altering and/or injuring the site, thereby making it more susceptible to another condition, such as metastatic skin tumors. In patients with an established diagnosis of visceral malignancy, the appearance of new keratoacanthoma-like lesions should prompt the clinician to consider a biopsy in order to establish or exclude the possibility of a cutaneous metastasis.
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