A HIGH-RESOLUTION X-RAY AND OPTICAL STUDY OF SN 1006: ASYMMETRIC EXPANSION AND SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE IN A TYPE IA SUPERNOVA REMNANT

P. Frank Winkler, Brian J. Williams, Stephen P. Reynolds, Robert Petre, Knox S. Long, Satoru Katsuda, Una Hwang
2014 Astrophysical Journal  
We introduce a deep (670 ks) X-ray survey of the SN1006 remnant from Chandra, plus a deep H-alpha image from the 4m telescope at CTIO. Comparison with Chandra images from 2003 gives the first measurement of X-ray proper motions around the entire rim. We find that the expansion velocity varies significantly with azimuth: the highest velocity of ~7400 km/s (almost 2.5 times that in the NW) is found along the SE rim, where both kinematics and spectra indicate that most of the X-rays stem from
more » ... rays stem from undecelerated ejecta. Asymmetries in the distribution of ejecta are seen on a variety of spatial scales. Si-rich ejecta are especially prominent in the SE quadrant, while O and Mg are more uniformly distributed, indicating large-scale asymmetries arising from the explosion itself. Ne emission is strongest in a sharp filament just behind the primary shock along the NW rim, where the preshock density is highest. Here the Ne is likely interstellar, while Ne within the shell may include a contribution from ejecta. Within the interior of the projected shell we find a few isolated "bullets" of what appear to be supernova ejecta that are immediately preceded by bowshocks seen in H-alpha--features we interpret as ejecta knots that have reached relatively dense regions of the surrounding ISM. Recent 3-dimensional hydrodynamic models for SN Ia display small-scale features that resemble the ones seen in X-rays in SN1006; an origin in the explosion itself or from subsequent instabilities both remain viable options. We have expanded the search for precursor X-ray emission ahead of a synchrotron-dominated shock front. Profiles along both NE and SW rims require that a precursor be thinner than about 3 arcsec and fainter than about 5% of the post-shock peak. These limits suggest that the magnetic field is amplified by a factor of 7 or more in a narrow precursor region, promoting diffusive particle acceleration.
doi:10.1088/0004-637x/781/2/65 fatcat:rwqhoksnqzfr3mqfejd3imov44