Determination of the Prevalence of Postpartum Depression and Risk Factors Among Postpartum Patients at a Tertiary Government Urban Hospital Using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale-Filipino Translation (EPDS-F): A Cross-Sectional Study [post]

Maria Carmina Lorenzana Santiago, Maria Antonia Esteban Habana
2020 unpublished
Background Postpartum depression (PPD) occurs in 10-15% of deliveries worldwide. Unfortunately there is a dearth of local studies on its exact prevalence. Method This cross-sectional study aimed to determine the prevalence of and risk factors for PPD among postpartum patients at a tertiary government hospital using the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale-Filipino Translation (EPDS-F), a 10-point questionnaire translated into Filipino and previously validated. Four hundred patients within 8
more » ... tients within 8 weeks postpartum were recruited and their EPDS-F scores and sociodemographic, medical and personal history, and delivery and perinatal outcome data were obtained. Results The overall prevalence of PPD was 14.5%, which is within the known worldwide prevalence. Among those that had family incomes below PhP10,000, the proportion that had high EPDS-F scores was 68.8%, while those that had low EPDS-F scores was 48.8% (significant at p=0.001). Among those that finished below tertiary education, the proportion that had high EPDS-F scores was 81%, while those that had low EPDS-F scores was 59.9% (significant at p=0.002). Among those who delivered vaginally, 62.1% had high EPDS-F scores vs 44.2% low EPDS-F (p=0.03). Of those that had epidural anesthesia (106 or 26.5%), 44.8% had high EPDS scores and 26.0% had low EPDS-F scores (p=0.04). Regression analysis showed that having an abdominal delivery is correlated with a lower EPDS-F score by 0.87% by logistic regression and 0.46 % by probit regression. Having a higher educational attainment and monthly income are associated with a lower EPDS-F score by regression analysis. Conclusions The prevalence may be skewed because a tertiary government institution caters to delicate pregnancies and those in low socioeconomic brackets. It may be worthwhile to compare responses from a public versus a private institution, also urban versus rural areas. It would be interesting also to evaluate the mode of delivery variable and how exactly it correlates with the development of postpartum depression.
doi:10.21203/rs.3.rs-34244/v1 fatcat:fbstokhse5ch7miattd2oufju4