THE SERVICES

1884 The Lancet  
The deaths referred to the principal zymotic diseases in the twenty-eight towns, which had been 447 and 456 in the two previous weeks, further rose to 460 last week; they included 117 from whooping-cough, 108 from scarlet fever, 100 from measles, 61 from "fever" (principally enteric), 28 from diphtheria, 27 from diarrhoea, and 19 from smallpox. No death from any of these zymotic diseases was registered last week in Plymouth, whereas they caused the highest death-rates in Salford, Preston,
more » ... ord, Preston, Huddersfield, Sheffield, and Sunderland. The highest deathrates from whooping-cough were recorded in Huddersfield and Brighton; from scarlet fever in Sheffield, Leeds, and Salford ; from measles in Salford, Birmingham, and Oldham; and from "fever" in Cardiff, Blackburn, Salford, and Preston. The 28 deaths from diphtheria in the twenty-eight towns included 16 in London and 3 in Hull. The 19 deaths from small-pox showed an increase of 7 upon the number in the previous week, and included 6 in Sunderland, 5 in London, and 4 both in Liverpool and in Birmingham. The number of small-pox patients in the metropolitan asylum hospitals, which had increased in the three preceding weeks from 89 to 107, declined to 102 on Saturday last; only 9 new cases were admitted to these hospitals during last week, against 15 and 21 in the two previous weeks. The Highgate Small-pox Hospital contained 11 patients on Saturday last, 2 new cases having been admitted during the week. The deaths referred to diseases of the respiratory organs in London, which had been 387 and 379 in the two preceding weeks, rose to 395 last week, but were 142 below the corrected weekly average. The causes of 81, or 2'3 per cent., of the deaths in the twenty-eight towns last week were not certified either by a registered medical practitioner or by a coroner. All the causes of death were duly certified in Bristol, Norwich, Leeds, and in seven other smaller towns. The proportions of uncertified deaths were largest in Birkenhead, Salford, Halifax, and Hull. ___ HEALTH OF SCOTCH TOWN. The annual rate of mortality in the eight Scotch towns, which had been equal to 25 .4 and 22 '1 per 1000 in the first two weeks of the year, further declined to 22 '0 in the week ending the 19th inst. ; this rate exceeded, however, by 1-3 the mean rate during the same week in the twenty-eight large English towns. The rates in the Scotch towns ranged from 15.6 and 18 '0 in Dundee and Leith, to 25-0 and 25'9 in Paisley and Glasgow. The deaths in the eight towns included 87 which were referred to the principal zymotic diseases, against 74 in each of the two preceding weeks; 22 resulted from diphtheria, 22 from whooping-cough, 17 from diarrhoea, 12 from scarlet fever, 8 from measles, 6 from "fever," and not one from small-pox. These 87 deaths were equal to an annual rate of 3'6 per 1000, which was 0'9 above the mean rate from the same diseases in the large English towns. The rates from these diseases in the Scotch towns ranged last week from 0 0 in Perth to 4'1 in Glasgow, 4'6 in Edinburgh, and 4'7 in Aberdeen. The 22 deaths referred to diphtheria showed a further increase upon recent weekly numbers, and included 8 in Aberdeen, 8 in Glasgow, and 3 in Edinburgh. The deaths from whooping-cough, which had been 18 and 13 in the two previous weeks, rose to 22 last week, of which no fewer than 17 occurred in Glasgow and 4 in Edinburgh. The 17 deaths attributed to diarrhoea included 6 in Glasgow and 4 both in Edinburgh and Dundee. Of the 12 fatal cases of scarlet fever, 8 were returned in Glasgow and 4 in Aberdeen; and 5 of the 8 deaths from measles occurred in Edinburgh. The 6 deaths referred to "fever" included 2 both in Glasgow and Edinburgh. The deaths attributed to acute diseases of the respiratory organs in the eight towns, which bad been 145 and 105 in the two previous weeks, further declined to 101 last week, and were no fewer than 58 below the number in the corresponding week of last year. The causes of 74, or nearly 14 per cent., of the deaths in the eight towns last week were not certified. ___ HEALTH OF DUBLIN. The rate of mortality in Dublin, which had been equal tc 28'7 and 27'1 per 1000 in the two preceding weeks, further declined to 26-9 in the week ending the 19th inst. Th( death-rate during the first three weeks of the curreni quarter averaged, however, 27'6 per 1000 in the city against 20-5 in London and 20'3 in Edinburgh. The 180 deaths in Dublin last week showed a further slight decline from the numbers returned in the two previous weeks, and included 8 which were referred to " fever " (including typhus, enteric, and simple continued), 5 to scarlet fever, 3 to whooping-cough, 3 to diarrhoea, and not one either to small-pox, measles, or diphtheria. Thus 19 deaths resulted from these ptincipal zymotic diseases, against 15 and 22 in the two preceding weeks; they were equal to an annual rate of 2'8 per 1000, while the rate from the same diseases was 2'6 in London and 4'9 in Edinburgh. The fatal cases of scarlet fever in Dublin, which had been 7 and 11 in the two preceding weeks, declined to 5 last week; whereas the deaths referred to "fever," which had been 3 and 6, further rose to 8, and exceeded the number returned in any recent week. The 3 deaths from whooping-cough corresponded with the number in the previous week. Three deaths were referred to different forms of violence. The deaths both of infants and of elderly persons showed a decline from the numbers in the previous week. The causes of 29, or more than 16 per cent., of the deaths registered during the week were not certified. THE SERVICES. ADMIRALTY.—The following appointments have been made :-Surgeons
doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(02)12775-9 fatcat:2fzexwldmzdqjjbt3esjipvv2m