Appraising the role of circulating concentrations of micro-nutrients in epithelial ovarian cancer risk: A Mendelian randomization analysis

Yan Guo, Yunlong Lu, Hongchuan Jin
2020 Scientific Reports  
To determine the causality of micro-nutrients concentrations and risk of ovarian cancer using the Mendelian randomization approach. Analyses were conducted using summary statistics data for SNPs robustly associated with concentrations of thirteen micro-nutrients (iron, copper, zinc, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, selenium, vitamin A, β-carotene, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, vitamin E, folate). The corresponding data for ovarian cancer were obtained from the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium
more » ... ,509 cases and 40,941 controls). In standard Mendelian randomization analysis, the odds ratios (OR) of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer were 0.14 (95% CI, 0.03-0.70; P = 0.02) per 0.1 mmol/L (about one standard deviation, SD) increase in genetically predicted magnesium concentration, 1.04 (95% CI, 1.00-1.09; P = 0.03) per 0.3 μmol/liter (about one SD) increase in genetically predicted β-carotene concentration. The OR of low malignant potential tumours were 0.82 (95% CI, 0.76-0.90; P = 1.01 × 10-5) per 0.3 μmol/liter (about one SD) increase in β-carotene concentration, 1.42 (95% CI, 1.21-1.68; P = 3 × 10-5) per 153 pmol/L (about one SD) increase in vitamin B12 concentration, 0.21 (95% CI, 0.06-0.76; P = 0.02) per 6 mg/L (about one SD) increase in vitamin E concentration. No significant associations of other micro-nutrients and ovarian cancer were observed. This study found that an increased risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer was observed with a genetically higher concentration of β-carotene, whereas a decreased risk of invasive epithelial ovarian cancer was found with a higher concentration of magnesium. As for low malignant potential tumours, increased concentration of vitamin B12 could increase the risk of low malignant potential tumours, while increased concentrations of β-carotene and vitamin E could lower the risk of low malignant potential tumours.
doi:10.1038/s41598-020-63909-5 pmid:32355161 fatcat:bm3flgiei5grvkbnndcjbtyyza