Eating disorders among Jordanian adolescents with and without dysglycaemia: a comparative study

Huda Al Hourani, Rana Ababneh, Nahla Khawaja, Yousef Khader, Kamel Ajlouni
2020 Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal  
Studies on eating disorders among Jordanian adolescents have reported variable prevalence rates of 12–40%. Aims: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of eating disorders among Jordanian adolescents with and without dysglycaemia and determine the associated factors. Methods: A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted during the period November 2017–February 2018. The Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale was used to assess the presence of different types of eating disorders, including
more » ... sorders, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. A typical anorexia nervosa and purging disorder were considered "other eating disorders" in this study. Results: This study included 497 patients with dysglycaemia and 504 age-matched nondysglycaemic participants. Patients with dysglycaemia had a significantly higher prevalence of binge eating disorders compared with nondysglycaemic participants (11.9% vs 5.8%, P < 0.001). In dysglycaemia group, adolescents who were aged ≥ 14 years were more likely to have bulimia nervosa compared with those < 14 years old. Patients with a sedentary lifestyle were less likely to have bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorders. In the nondysglycaemic group, those aged 14–18 years were more likely to have other eating disorders. Those with dysglycaemia were more likely to have binge eating disorders than those in the nondysglycaemic group (OR = 2.1, 95% CI: 1.3–3.3; P = 0.002) after adjusting for possible confounders. Conclusions: Adolescents with dysglycaemia had higher prevalence of eating disorders compared with their nondysglycaemic peers. Screening for eating disorders is recommended among adolescents to secure early detection and subsequent intervention.
doi:10.26719/emhj.20.86 pmid:33355389 fatcat:lb4zmx5onbh3bis6v3bg3vqcv4