Certainty, risk and knowledge in the satisfaction‐purchase intention relationship in a new product experiment

Ho Huy Tuu, Svein Ottar Olsen
2012 Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics  
1 Certainty, risk and knowledge in the satisfaction-purchase intention relationship in a new product experiment Abstract Purpose -This study examines the roles of perceived certainty, manipulated risk and knowledge in the satisfaction-purchase intention relationship in a context of a new product evaluation. Design / methodology / approach -This study uses a 2 x 2 factorial design with 120 participants and a combination of methods to test hypotheses. Findings -The findings indicate that
more » ... ion is not different between the respondents in high-versus low-risk groups and in high-versus low-knowledge groups. However, the respondents of low-risk as well as high-knowledge groups report a higher purchase intention. Interestingly, the movement from satisfaction to purchase intention is higher among the respondents with higher certainty, and among the respondents in low-risk as well as highknowledge groups. Furthermore, in the conditions of low-manipulated knowledge, higher manipulated risk leads to a significantly lower consistence between satisfaction and purchase intention. By contrast, in the conditions of high-manipulated knowledge, the decease in the consistence between satisfaction and purchase intention is not significant. Thus, the results reveal that manipulated knowledge reduces the negative moderator effect of manipulated risk on the satisfaction-purchase intention relationship. Research limitations / implications -This study uses only one new food product, thus future studies should use an experimental design with a variety of new different products, brands and services to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the formation of purchase intentions. Both product risk and consumer knowledge consist of multidimensional constructs, thus it will be interesting for future studies to manipulate each of the facets of product risk (e.g., financial risk) and knowledge (e.g., procedural knowledge) to explore their effects on consumer satisfaction and purchase intentions as well as the relationship between these two constructs. Practical implications -Our findings suggest that managers should be aware of satisfaction strength and risk in their estimation of purchase intention based on satisfaction measurement. Marketing strategies, which reduce consumers' risks, consolidate their confidence and educate them with relevant knowledge, may be effective strategies to increase their purchase intention, especially towards new products. Originality / Value -This is, to our knowledge, the first study to examine simultaneously the different roles of perceived certainty, manipulated risk and knowledge within a satisfactionpurchase intention relationship. It is also the first to provide empirical evidence supporting an interaction between knowledge and risk affecting the satisfaction-purchase intention relationship. Finally, it uses a controlled experiment in the context of a new product evaluation to confirm causal effects.
doi:10.1108/13555851211192713 fatcat:pkg4dnzm6jh5lnkrrk4mjzfviy