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XLIV. Observations on the hypothesis of some modern writers, that America has been peopled by a distinct race of men and animals; with some proofs arising from the natural history and appearances of the new continent in favour of the mosaic account of the deluge

Hugh Williamson
1816 The Philosophical Magazine  
Print) 1941-580x (Online) Journal homepage: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/tphm12 XLIV. Observations on the hypothesis of some modern writers, that America has been peopled by a distinct race of men and animals; with some proofs arising from the natural history and appearances of the new continent in favour of the mosaic account of the deluge Hugh Williamson M.D. To cite this article: Hugh Williamson M.D. (1816) XLIV. Observations on the hypothesis of some modern writers, that America has been
more » ... t America has been peopled by a distinct race of men and animals; with some proofs arising from the natural history and appearances of the new continent in favour of the mosaic account of the deluge , Philosophical Magazine Series 1, 48:221, 205-222, W~ observe a regular systematical eharrge in the colour, shape, and features of men, to the north and the south. From the climate of a fair skin, fine shape and pleasing feature, going to the northward, the skill becomes of a blackish brown, the figure clumsy, and the features coarse. Going to the southward, in the sBme manner, we alter the eomplexion~ shape and features, until the skiu becomes perfectly black, the shape in some Countries' less gracefid, and the features coarse: the colour being attered~ according to the soil, situation and climate, by the most regular and insensible deviations and shades. Those t~cts being considered; it being also observed, that every change is most proper and best adapted to the climate, or that it is the natural effect of such climate; there can be no moral or physical proposition more certain, than that all those people are deseended fl'om the same family. The philosophers, who discovered several races of men on the old continent, have not failed to plant a new and distinct race of men in America. In support of this opinion, they allege that the American [t~.dians do not differ fro~m one another in colour, like the inhabitants of the other continent J" : their eolour also is differen¢ fl-om that of any other people: that the American has no beard; that he is more frigid, more weak and more c, owardlv than the inhabitant~ of the old continent. This humble apd subordinate character of the American sa-~,-age has not always been urged as a direct proof that he belongs to a separate race of tnen~ for it has occasionally been advanced in the pride of com~try ; a species of pride that will not suffer children to equal their ancestors; that makes it impossible for them to obtain such equality, because there is something in America, as they allege, " that is less favourable to the strength and perfection of animal creation." The complexion of the American savage, or the santeness of colour that is observed among those people, fbrms the most remarkable trait in their character, When we observe, in the old From "Observations on the Climate in different Parts of Amet'ica,.
doi:10.1080/14786441608637646 fatcat:efygakvgonbvvj4jz3mbxcicmy