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Original Correspondence

1871 The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular  
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more » ... Morceau de Salon, par El. B. Ellis," it puzzles us to discover; but the music is truly British (at least, as our fashionable native composers have latterly represented the nation) if we except a reminiscence of Schurllann's 4' Arabesque " in the theme after the double bar, on page 2. hIr. Ellis writes freely, however, and the passages are generally effective. There is no reason why 44 Sunshine') 6hould not be admitted into our drawing-rooms as well as manv other specimens of what ay bs called " weather music." WILLIABI CZERNY. Six characteristzc Fieces for tAle Piano, for emall hande. Composed by (?scar Beringer. 'l'HEsE six trifles, moulded on the plan setby Schumann in his " Kinderscenen " are well written, and will be found extremely useful for young plavers. Although carefully adapted ior small hands, they are by no means easy, being obviousl) the composition of one who has trained himself in the German school, where close playing with the two hands, even in juvenile music, i8 the rule rather than the exception. This style is especially oleservable in No. 3 44 Garlands of flowers," and also in many portions of the other pieces, some of which however are perhaps a little too restless for sketches of such slight pretension. No. 1, 4' Soldier's March," has a good bold subject, and a second melodious theme, in the subdominant * but we much prefer 4' Arny's little song," No. 2, which is exceedingly pleasing, andcontaills some efictivemodulations. NVe have already spoken of ; GParlands of flowers," which, apart from its attI-activeness as a piece, will form a good exercise for the fingers of both hands. No. 4, ;4 The Young Uhlan," has scarcely a sufficiently pleasing subject to illterest juvenile students; but No. 5, *4 In the ssing," can hardly fail to become a favourite. The monotonou3 motion suggested by the title is happily carried out, and the thenle in the relative minor i9 highly eff8ective. No. 6, " A village holiday," with its pedal bass, is somewhat conventional but it is full of character-children, however, will be puzzled to know exactly the meaning of the direction at the commencement, Burlesque et f." I'hree Jlusical Sketches for the Pzano. Composed by Bennett Gilbert. WE have copied the title of AIr. Gilbert's pieces-but as No. 2, *' Hunting Song," alone has reached us, we have only to e2:press a hope that the other two are as good as the one before us. Of course, having refereIlce to the hunting field, the conventional horn passages are to be found plentifully scattered throughout the composition; but the subject, in A maJor, is fresh and melodious, and although reminding us in parts of the well-known pianoforte lied of Mendel3sohn in the same key, we can conscientiously recommend it on its own rrlerits. Nos. 1 and 3 4Spring's greeting" and 4;A lvinter's tale"are no doubt intended by the composer as contrasts to the one we have noticed, and we think should scarcely be separated from it in performance. BRF>MER AND CO. Gemsfrom Batndel's Italian Operas Transcribed from the full scol es for the pianoforte. No. 1, " Mi Lusinga il dolce aSetto." Handel's Songs, arranged from the full scores for the organ. No. 1,;' Lord, renlember David," No. 2, ;' 0 Lord, whom we adore." By J. H. Deane. HANDEL'S Italian operas are indeed but little known in the present day; and yet whenever a song from these almost forgotten works happens to be disinterred it rarely iails to take its place with the lovers of really sterling music. The song from the opera of 4; Alcina," which has been ably and unassumingly transcribed by Mr. Deane, JOSEPU WILLIAMS . Sunshzne. Morceau de Salon pour Piano, par I1. B. Ellis. WEY a piece having the English word " Sunshine " for its title dlould be called a 44 Morceau de Salon, par El. B. Ellis," it puzzles us to discover; but the music is truly British (at least, as our fashionable native composers have latterly represented the nation) if we except a reminiscence of Schurllann's 4' Arabesque " in the theme after the double bar, on page 2. hIr. Ellis writes freely, however, and the passages are generally effective. There is no reason why 44 Sunshine') 6hould not be admitted into our drawing-rooms as well as manv other specimens of what ay bs called " weather music." WILLIABI CZERNY. Six characteristzc Fieces for tAle Piano, for emall hande. Composed by (?scar Beringer. 'l'HEsE six trifles, moulded on the plan setby Schumann in his " Kinderscenen " are well written, and will be found extremely useful for young plavers. Although carefully adapted ior small hands, they are by no means easy, being obviousl) the composition of one who has trained himself in the German school, where close playing with the two hands, even in juvenile music, i8 the rule rather than the exception. This style is especially oleservable in No. 3 44 Garlands of flowers," and also in many portions of the other pieces, some of which however are perhaps a little too restless for sketches of such slight pretension. No. 1, 4' Soldier's March," has a good bold subject, and a second melodious theme, in the subdominant * but we much prefer 4' Arny's little song," No. 2, which is exceedingly pleasing, andcontaills some efictivemodulations. NVe have already spoken of ; GParlands of flowers," which, apart from its attI-activeness as a piece, will form a good exercise for the fingers of both hands. No. 4, ;4 The Young Uhlan," has scarcely a sufficiently pleasing subject to illterest juvenile students; but No. 5, *4 In the ssing," can hardly fail to become a favourite. The monotonou3 motion suggested by the title is happily carried out, and the thenle in the relative minor i9 highly eff8ective. No. 6, " A village holiday," with its pedal bass, is somewhat conventional but it is full of character-children, however, will be puzzled to know exactly the meaning of the direction at the commencement, Burlesque et f." I'hree Jlusical Sketches for the Pzano. Composed by Bennett Gilbert. WE have copied the title of AIr. Gilbert's pieces-but as No. 2, *' Hunting Song," alone has reached us, we have only to e2:press a hope that the other two are as good as the one before us. Of course, having refereIlce to the hunting field, the conventional horn passages are to be found plentifully scattered throughout the composition; but the subject, in A maJor, is fresh and melodious, and although reminding us in parts of the well-known pianoforte lied of Mendel3sohn in the same key, we can conscientiously recommend it on its own rrlerits. Nos. 1 and 3 4Spring's greeting" and 4;A lvinter's tale"are no doubt intended by the composer as contrasts to the one we have noticed, and we think should scarcely be separated from it in performance. BRF>MER AND CO. Gemsfrom Batndel's Italian Operas Transcribed from the full scol es for the pianoforte. No. 1, " Mi Lusinga il dolce aSetto." Handel's Songs, arranged from the full scores for the organ. No. 1,;' Lord, renlember David," No. 2, ;' 0 Lord, whom we adore." By J. H. Deane. HANDEL'S Italian operas are indeed but little known in the present day; and yet whenever a song from these almost forgotten works happens to be disinterred it rarely iails to take its place with the lovers of really sterling music. The song from the opera of 4; Alcina," which has been ably and unassumingly transcribed by Mr. Deane, JOSEPU WILLIAMS . Sunshzne. Morceau de Salon pour Piano, par I1. B. Ellis. WEY a piece having the English word " Sunshine " for its title dlould be called a 44 Morceau de Salon, par El. B. Ellis," it puzzles us to discover; but the music is truly British (at least, as our fashionable native composers have latterly represented the nation) if we except a reminiscence of Schurllann's 4' Arabesque " in the theme after the double bar, on page 2. hIr. Ellis writes freely, however, and the passages are generally effective. There is no reason why 44 Sunshine') 6hould not be admitted into our drawing-rooms as well as manv other specimens of what ay bs called " weather music." WILLIABI CZERNY. TlIE MUSICAL TIS. FOrMU9.DOC.theCandidate(WhOiSaireadYMUS.BaC.) BRENTWOOD. On Tuesda evening, the 27th June, must write a portion at least of his. composition in sis or a concert was given at the schools of Christ Church, Great Warle;y eight real parts with accolllpaniment for full band The Brentwood (in aid of funds for their enlargement), by the choir, ' . .-assisted bv a fevf friends. The soprano 90108 were most Yucces8fully exanllnation is more searching than, and dluers ln some sung by Miss Edith Blair; and Mr. C. H. Unwin (Tenor) and aOts essential parts from, that for Alus. Bac. Moncrieff (Bass) also elicited much applause. Mr. Geo. Brace's These, so far as l recollect, are the main feature,9 conviolin playing was a prominent feature in the evening's performance. . 1 . > . . . Several Dart-songs alld glees were ziven b r the choir wwith excellent nectec w1tn tlle aegrees. P ul L lnIormatlon, nowever, as precision alld effect. Mr. T. H. Bunbury the organist, conducted to fees, sul)Jects of general e2zamination, &c., is given in and accompallied. the University Calendar, and there i3,Ibelieve, published DERBY. The organ recently erected in the new and a short syllabus of the requirements for musical degrees, beautiful ch,lrch St. Luke (which wag consecrated on the 24th We do not hold ourselves sesponstble fov any opinions expressed in given by Herr Albert Pieckzonka, at the Public Hall, assisted by this Summary; as all the notices a.-e either collatedfrom th4 local Madame Leonie de Vattelette (Professor of the Harp from the papers, orsuppltecL to ?sS by occasional correspondents. Conservatoire, Paris), Miss Fanny Poole and Signor TessemaIls ADELAIDE. The performance of Rombergs8 l;ay of Burleigh The principal feature in the programme was the pianothe BelZ, and Handel's Acis and (7alatea, by the Philharmonic fft°Ortceertpsetrufcokrmananfcfeectifvteharrcaonngeeemtengtvoef 'thWhicwatncchluodnetdhewhbee ^ Society Tvas a decided succes,s. The princlpal p rt8 inwheDr t-pieces by Chopin and Heller. Li T-W-Ingram and G. C. Smith, and in the second by Mi89 P°1°naiSe of his own composition, all of which were given wit Vaughan Messrs-F-Searle J. S Brookes and L Grayson. all of good eseCutlve power and musical feeling. Mallame de Vattellette0 tom wsre *-0rOUg* sy e . ? *r n . 91 har z x)la rine was also thorouzhlv aD zreciated, her most effective exceedingly well rendered lczent ; .spilel loru es on tne wa tetor Mr P e e bei lg the "r)anse des Snlphes ' of Godefroid. Miss FannW B-B-White, R-A-M-as leader, and Mr. Jame8 ShakeSpeare'pre Poole and SlGnor Burleigh's songs were well rendered and Irsuc 9ided at the pianoforte The band congisted of about twenty applauded, and the concert was in everyrespecthighly succesSful. performers, and the chorus numbered between ninety and a
doi:10.2307/3354665 fatcat:dswjuuuh3reyhidrj2rl475lqq