Filters








7 Hits in 0.62 sec

A genomic history of Aboriginal Australia

Anna-Sapfo Malaspinas, Michael C. Westaway, Craig Muller, Vitor C. Sousa, Oscar Lao, Isabel Alves, Anders Bergström, Georgios Athanasiadis, Jade Y. Cheng, Jacob E. Crawford, Tim H. Heupink, Enrico Macholdt (+63 others)
2016 Nature  
doi:10.1038/nature18299 pmid:27654914 fatcat:zush6rpjsvg5zgj7xjfgiriowu

Population genomics of the Viking world [article]

Ashot Margaryan, Daniel John Lawson, Martin Sikora, Fernando Racimo, Simon Rasmussen, Ida Moltke, Lara Cassidy, Emil Jorsboe, Andres Ingason, Mikkel Winther Pedersen, Thorfinn Sand Korneliussen, Helene Wilhelmson (+73 others)
2019 biorxiv/medrxiv   pre-print
The Viking maritime expansion from Scandinavia (Denmark, Norway, and Sweden) marks one of the swiftest and most far-flung cultural transformations in global history. During this time (c. 750 to 1050 CE), the Vikings reached most of western Eurasia, Greenland, and North America, and left a cultural legacy that persists till today. To understand the genetic structure and influence of the Viking expansion, we sequenced the genomes of 442 ancient humans from across Europe and Greenland ranging from
more » ... the Bronze Age (c. 2400 BC) to the early Modern period (c. 1600 CE), with particular emphasis on the Viking Age. We find that the period preceding the Viking Age was accompanied by foreign gene flow into Scandinavia from the south and east: spreading from Denmark and eastern Sweden to the rest of Scandinavia. Despite the close linguistic similarities of modern Scandinavian languages, we observe genetic structure within Scandinavia, suggesting that regional population differences were already present 1,000 years ago. We find evidence for a majority of Danish Viking presence in England, Swedish Viking presence in the Baltic, and Norwegian Viking presence in Ireland, Iceland, and Greenland. Additionally, we see substantial foreign European ancestry entering Scandinavia during the Viking Age. We also find that several of the members of the only archaeologically well-attested Viking expedition were close family members. By comparing Viking Scandinavian genomes with present-day Scandinavian genomes, we find that pigmentation-associated loci have undergone strong population differentiation during the last millennia. Finally, we are able to trace the allele frequency dynamics of positively selected loci with unprecedented detail, including the lactase persistence allele and various alleles associated with the immune response. We conclude that the Viking diaspora was characterized by substantial foreign engagement: distinct Viking populations influenced the genomic makeup of different regions of Europe, while Scandinavia also experienced increased contact with the rest of the continent.
doi:10.1101/703405 fatcat:egpcezysqbctvckdegf7x646ui

Population genomics of the Viking world

Ashot Margaryan, Daniel J Lawson, Martin Sikora, Fernando Racimo, Simon Rasmussen, Ida Moltke, Lara M Cassidy, Emil Jørsboe, Andrés Ingason, Mikkel W Pedersen, Thorfinn Korneliussen, Helene Wilhelmson (+78 others)
2020 Nature  
The maritime expansion of Scandinavian populations during the Viking Age (about AD 750-1050) was a far-flung transformation in world history1,2. Here we sequenced the genomes of 442 humans from archaeological sites across Europe and Greenland (to a median depth of about 1×) to understand the global influence of this expansion. We find the Viking period involved gene flow into Scandinavia from the south and east. We observe genetic structure within Scandinavia, with diversity hotspots in the
more » ... h and restricted gene flow within Scandinavia. We find evidence for a major influx of Danish ancestry into England; a Swedish influx into the Baltic; and Norwegian influx into Ireland, Iceland and Greenland. Additionally, we see substantial ancestry from elsewhere in Europe entering Scandinavia during the Viking Age. Our ancient DNA analysis also revealed that a Viking expedition included close family members. By comparing with modern populations, we find that pigmentation-associated loci have undergone strong population differentiation during the past millennium, and trace positively selected loci-including the lactase-persistence allele of LCT and alleles of ANKA that are associated with the immune response-in detail. We conclude that the Viking diaspora was characterized by substantial transregional engagement: distinct populations influenced the genomic makeup of different regions of Europe, and Scandinavia experienced increased contact with the rest of the continent.
doi:10.1038/s41586-020-2688-8 pmid:32939067 fatcat:uppzo7y6dbfmjpweo3dxuuhbpm

Tracking Five Millennia of Horse Management with Extensive Ancient Genome Time Series

Antoine Fages, Kristian Hanghøj, Naveed Khan, Charleen Gaunitz, Andaine Seguin-Orlando, Michela Leonardi, Christian McCrory Constantz, Cristina Gamba, Khaled A.S. Al-Rasheid, Silvia Albizuri, Ahmed H. Alfarhan, Morten Allentoft (+109 others)
2019 Cell  
Horse domestication revolutionized warfare and accelerated travel, trade, and the geographic expansion of languages. Here, we present the largest DNA time series for a non-human organism to date, including genome-scale data from 149 ancient animals and 129 ancient genomes (≥1-fold coverage), 87 of which are new. This extensive dataset allows us to assess the modern legacy of past equestrian civilizations. We find that two extinct horse lineages existed during early domestication, one at the far
more » ... western (Iberia) and the other at the far eastern range (Siberia) of Eurasia. None of these contributed significantly to modern diversity. We show that the influence of Persian-related horse lineages increased following the Islamic conquests in Europe and Asia. Multiple alleles associated with elite-racing, including at the MSTN "speed gene," only rose in popularity within the last millennium. Finally, the development of modern breeding impacted genetic diversity more dramatically than the previous millennia of human management.
doi:10.1016/j.cell.2019.03.049 pmid:31056281 pmcid:PMC6547883 fatcat:awsq4jmfefatfchrkgzwwok33q

137 ancient human genomes from across the Eurasian steppes

Peter De Barros Damgaard, Nina Marchi, Simon Rasmussen, Michaël Peyrot, Gabriel Renaud, Thorfinn Korneliussen, J Víctor Moreno-Mayar, Mikkel Winther Pedersen, Amy Goldberg, Emma Usmanova, Nurbol Baimukhanov, Valeriy Loman (+66 others)
2020
73 74 For thousands of years, the Eurasian steppe has been a centre for human migrations 75 and cultural change. To understand its population history following the Bronze Age 76 migrations, we genome-sequenced 137 ancient humans (~1X average coverage) covering 77 the past 4000 years. We find that Scythian groups that dominated the Eurasian steppe 78 throughout the Iron Age, were highly structured, with diverse origins comprising Late 79 Bronze Age herders, European farmers, and South Siberian
more » ... nter-gatherers. Later, 80 Scythians admixed with eastern steppe nomads that formed the Xiongnu confederations, 81 and moved westward in the ~3 rd /2 nd century BCE, forming the Hun traditions in the 4 th -82 5 th century CE, carrying with them plague basal to the Justinian. These nomads were 83 further admixed with East Asian groups during several short-term Medieval khanates. 84 These historical events transformed the Eurasian steppe, from being inhabited by Indo-85 3
doi:10.17863/cam.59351 fatcat:fprsoh55g5blxfnfovmwmb4724

Correcting for Purifying Selection: An Improved Human Mitochondrial Molecular Clock

Pedro Soares, Luca Ermini, Noel Thomson, Maru Mormina, Teresa Rito, Arne Röhl, Antonio Salas, Stephen Oppenheimer, Vincent Macaulay, Martin B. Richards
2009 American Journal of Human Genetics  
Ellingvåg (of Explico) for the Canarian samples.  ...  Acknowledgments We thank Toomas Kivisild, Hans-Jürgen Bandelt, Matthew Spriggs, Jacob Morales, Colin Groves, Stanley Ambrose, Yan Wong, and Marie-Anne Shaw for invaluable advice and suggestions and Sturla  ... 
doi:10.1016/j.ajhg.2009.05.001 pmid:19500773 pmcid:PMC2694979 fatcat:nx5wykigt5ftflwzqwzaaqm5ka

The first horse herders and the impact of early Bronze Age steppe expansions into Asia

Peter de Barros Damgaard, Rui Martiniano, Jack Kamm, J. Víctor Moreno-Mayar, Guus Kroonen, Michaël Peyrot, Gojko Barjamovic, Simon Rasmussen, Claus Zacho, Nurbol Baimukhanov, Victor Zaibert, Victor Merz (+39 others)
2018 Science  
We thank Sturla Ellingvåg, Bettina Elisabeth Heyerdahl, and the Explico-Historical Research Foundation team as well as Niobe Thompson for involvement in field work.  ... 
doi:10.1126/science.aar7711 pmid:29743352 fatcat:nuxn4wrnmrgb7jg75ojlv34ycu