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Continuous Delivery? Easy! Just Change Everything (Well, Maybe It Is Not That Easy)

Steve Neely, Steve Stolt
2013 2013 Agile Conference  
Rally Software transitioned from shipping code every eight-weeks, with time-boxed Scrum sprints, to a model of continuous delivery with Kanban. The team encountered complex challenges with their build systems, automated test suites, customer enablement, and internal communication. But there was light at the end of the tunnel -greater control and flexibility over feature releases, incremental delivery of value, lower risks, fewer defects, easier on-boarding of new developers, less off-hours
more » ... and a considerable uptick in confidence. This experience report describes the journey to continuous delivery with the aim that others can learn from our mistakes and get their teams deploying more frequently. We will describe and contrast this transition from the business (product management) and engineering perspectives.
doi:10.1109/agile.2013.17 dblp:conf/agiledc/NeelyS13 fatcat:qc4pk6pu4baate7mjwfowcwg5e

Adaptive middleware for autonomic systems

Steve Neely, Simon Dobson, Paddy Nixon
2006 Annales des télécommunications  
The increasingly dynamic nature of resource discovery and binding in modern large-scale distributed and mobile systems poses significant challenges for existing middleware platforms. Future platforms must provide strong support for adaptive behaviour in order both to maintain and optimise services in the face of changing context. We use a survey of existing middleware systems to develop some core themes that characterise and constrain the ability of these approaches to support the development
more » ... adaptive and autonomic systems, and draw some possible trends for developing future platforms more appropriate to these domains. La nature toujours plus dynamique de la decouverte et attachement de services en ce qui concerne les larges systemes modernes mobiles et distribues pose des defis significatifs pour les plate-formes logiciels intermediaires. Ces futures plates-formes devront fournir un large support en ce qui concerne le comportement adaptif afin de maintenir et optimiser les services face a un changement de contexte. Nous exploitons une etude des systemes logiciels intermediaires pour developper des themes centraux qui caracterisent et limitent la portée de ces approches dans le developpement de systemes autonomes et adaptifs, et nous exposons des tendances plausibles pour le developpement de futures plates-formes plus appropriees a ces domaines.
doi:10.1007/bf03219883 fatcat:4meysp33qbeezlervhstjr5sby

Harvesting for Full-Text Retrieval [chapter]

Fabio Simeoni, Murat Yakici, Steve Neely, Fabio Crestani
2005 Lecture Notes in Computer Science  
We propose an approach to Distributed Information Retrieval based on the periodic and incremental centralisation of full-text indices of widely dispersed and autonomously managed content sources. Inspired by the success of the Open Archive Initiative's protocol for metadata harvesting, the approach occupies middle ground between: (i) the crawling of content, and (ii) the distribution of retrieval. As in crawling, some data moves towards the retrieval process, but it is statistics about the
more » ... nt rather than content itself. As in distributed retrieval, some processing is distributed along with the data, but it is indexing rather than retrieval itself. We show that the approach retains the good properties of centralised retrieval without renouncing to cost-effective resource pooling. We discuss the requirements associated with the approach and identify two strategies to deploy it on top of the OAI infrastructure.
doi:10.1007/11599517_24 fatcat:el6o6pch45fndmdvujqagrspfm

How to avoid the problems of target‐setting

Alan Meekings, Steve Briault, Andy Neely
2011 Measuring Business Excellence  
Advocates and critics of target-setting in the workplace seem unable to reach beyond their own well-entrenched battle lines. While the advocates of goaldirected behaviour point to what they see as demonstrable advantages, the critics of target-setting highlight equally demonstrable disadvantages. Indeed, academic literature on this topic is currently mired in controversy, with neither side seemingly capable of envisaging a better way forward. This paper outlines a more fruitful approach, based
more » ... oth on theory and practical experience. Context Advocates of target-setting in the workplace and their critics seem unable to agree on any common ground. This is perhaps not surprising, as there are clear contradictions between the arguments advanced by both sides. On the one hand, there is incontrovertible evidence of the damaging effects of arbitrary numerical target-setting and, yet, on the other hand, there is a significant body of academic evidence supporting the benefits of 'goal-directed behaviour'. So, the obvious question is, "Can such fundamental contradictions be resolved, and, if so, how?" The logical place to start is by reviewing the two competing points of view. In The Red Corner In the red corner stand the advocates of 'goal-directed behaviour'. They point to sundry benefits, such as:  "Challenging goals lead to better performance than do easy or vague goals" (Latham & Locke, 1979) . Indeed, Locke and Latham are insistent that "goal-setting theory is among the most scientifically valid and useful theories in organizational science" (Locke, Latham and Erez, 1988); and  Happier people. For instance, experiments conducted by the Department of Psychology at Oxford Brookes University, linked to the Oxford Happiness Project (Holden, 1996) , showed that depressed individuals who identified and then worked towards constructive goals became demonstrably happier through this exercise alone. Indeed, goal-directed planning has been shown to initiate activity in the frontal lobes of our brains, which also control our sense of happiness. Hence there seems to be a direct connection between goal-directed behaviour and happiness (all other influencing factors being equal).
doi:10.1108/13683041111161175 fatcat:qfm75my4gjhnxal2xprdxrx7xy

An Evaluation Framework for Disseminating Context Information with Gossiping [chapter]

Graham Williamson, Graeme Stevenson, Steve Neely, Simon Dobson, Paddy Nixon
2006 Lecture Notes in Computer Science  
As we gain access to increasing volumes of context data, we face the problem of moving this information from the sensors that produce it to the applications that consume it. Our approach to this problem uses gossiping, a probabilistic routing protocol, to disseminate context information throughout the environment. We present on-going work on evaluating the performance of different gossiping protocols for this purpose.
doi:10.1007/11907503_21 fatcat:ojix2obdynfxpkavo2fk7cks6y

Construct: An Open Source Pervasive Systems Platform

Simon Dobson, Paddy Nixon, Lorcan Coyle, Steve Neely, Greame Stevenson, Graham Williamson
2007 2007 4th IEEE Consumer Communications and Networking Conference  
Construct differs from other pervasive systems platforms in a number of key respects. It is completely standardsbased, using RDF as its data exchange model and ZeroConf for resource discovery. It supports a knowledgecentric model of interaction where clients' actions are driven by queries and triggers about the context of the system. It uses gossiping to maintain a consistent state across a distributed data structure, which maximises robustness and scalability and avoids many problems with
more » ... pots and hot-paths in communications. Finally, it treats all information sources uniformly as sensors acting as inputs to uncertain reasoning algorithms.
doi:10.1109/ccnc.2007.254 dblp:conf/ccnc/DobsonNCNSW07 fatcat:iwu2iubwbfertly2sacn57ke3i

Scalable information dissemination for pervasive systems

Graham Williamson, Graeme Stevenson, Steve Neely, Lorcan Coyle, Paddy Nixon
2006 Proceedings of the 4th international workshop on Middleware for Pervasive and Ad-Hoc Computing (MPAC 2006) - MPAC '06  
Pervasive computing systems require large amounts of information to be available to devices in order to support contextaware applications. Information must be routed from the sensors that provide it to the applications that consume it in a timely fashion. However, the potential size and ad hoc nature of these environments makes the management of communications a non-trivial task. One proposed solution to this problem uses gossiping, a class of probabilistic routing protocol, to disseminate
more » ... xt information throughout the environment. Gossiping algorithms require far less in the way of guarantees about network structure, reliability, and latency than alternative approaches, but are unproven in real world scenarios. We describe the on-going development of a framework for evaluating the performance of these algorithms within the context of pervasive environments.
doi:10.1145/1169075.1169082 dblp:conf/middleware/WilliamsonSNCN06 fatcat:jwv6wvvamjblbhvitogmgor2t4

Resolving uncertainty in context integration and abstraction

Juan Ye, Susan McKeever, Lorcan Coyle, Steve Neely, Simon Dobson
2008 Proceedings of the 5th international conference on Pervasive services - ICPS '08  
Pervasive computing is typically highly sensor-driven, but sensors provide only evidence of fact rather than facts themselves. The uncertainty of sensor data will affect each component in a pervasive computing system, which may decrease the quality of its provided services. We provide a general model to represent semantics of uncertainty in different levels (e.g., sensor, lower-level context and higherlevel context). Within our model, fine-grained approaches are applied to evaluate and
more » ... uncertainties. They will help to resolve the uncertainty in each process of context management so that the effect of uncertainty on system services will be minimised.
doi:10.1145/1387269.1387292 dblp:conf/icps/YeMCND08 fatcat:pawgjptcmjd37ckcbbfz3ncpay

The Astra Gemini Petawatt Ti:Sapphire Laser

Chris J. HOOKER, John L. COLLIER, Oleg CHEKHLOV, Robert J. CLARKE, Edwin J. DIVALL, Klaus ERTEL, Peta FOSTER, Steve HANCOCK, Steve J. HAWKES, Paul HOLLIGAN, Andrew J. LANGLEY, William J. LESTER (+3 others)
2009 The Review of Laser Engineering  
In this review we describe the rationale and technical design concepts of the Astra Gemini laser system at the Central Laser Facility (CLF) of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the United Kingdom. We discuss the significant technical issues that were addressed during the design stage and present the solutions we developed to resolve them, including innovative ideas for varying the pulse stretch and suppressing gain depletion by amplifi ed spontaneous emission. Finally we present some results obtained during the commissioning of the laser.
doi:10.2184/lsj.37.443 fatcat:6fqmv2y3n5huzhqio2omb3p5y4

Metadata harvesting for content-based distributed information retrieval

Fabio Simeoni, Murat Yakici, Steve Neely, Fabio Crestani
2007 Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology  
We propose an approach to content-based Distributed Information Retrieval based on the periodic and incremental centralisation of full-content indices of widely dispersed and autonomously managed document sources. Inspired by the success of the Open Archive Initiative's protocol for metadata harvesting, the approach occupies middle ground between content crawling and distributed retrieval. As in crawling, some data moves towards the retrieval process, but it is statistics about the content
more » ... r than content itself; this grants more 1 efficient use of network resources and wider scope of application. As in distributed retrieval, some processing is distributed along with the data, but it is indexing rather than retrieval; this reduces the costs of content provision whilst promoting the simplicity, effectiveness, and responsiveness of retrieval. Overall, we argue that the approach retains the good properties of centralised retrieval without renouncing to cost-effective, large-scale resource pooling. We discuss the requirements associated with the approach and identify two strategies to deploy it on top of the OAI infrastructure. In particular, we define a minimal extension of the OAI protocol which supports the coordinated harvesting of full-content indices and descriptive metadata for content resources. Finally, we report on the implementation of a proof-of-concept prototype service for multi-model content-based retrieval of distributed file collections.
doi:10.1002/asi.20694 fatcat:w36nubuvafgexommwq4nidzipq

A single-molecule method for the quantitation of microRNA gene expression

Lori A Neely, Sonal Patel, Joanne Garver, Michael Gallo, Maria Hackett, Stephen McLaughlin, Mark Nadel, John Harris, Steve Gullans, Jenny Rooke
2006 Nature Methods  
doi:10.1038/nmeth825 pmid:16369552 fatcat:q26opdkugzgczkdi7kc3ij4ixy

An architecture for supporting vicarious learning in a distributed environment

Steve Neely, Helen Lowe, David Eyers, Jean Bacon, Julian Newman, Xiaofeng Gong
2004 Proceedings of the 2004 ACM symposium on Applied computing - SAC '04  
Existing software systems designed to support learning do not adequately provide for vicarious learning in a crossinstitutional collaborative environment. We have developed an architecture based on role-based access control, which provides the necessary security, robustness, flexibility, and explicit formulation of policy. Such an architecture is general enough to be used in a variety of educational institutions and settings, yet flexible enough to allow a wide range of policies within a single system.
doi:10.1145/967900.968095 dblp:conf/sac/NeelyLEBNG04 fatcat:or2ejajv3neenok3onjws535p4

Towards a definition of a business performance measurement system

Monica Franco‐Santos, Mike Kennerley, Pietro Micheli, Veronica Martinez, Steve Mason, Bernard Marr, Dina Gray, Andrew Neely, Mike Bourne
2007 International Journal of Operations & Production Management  
.; Bourne, M. and Neely, A. (2003), Understanding strategic performance measurement systems and their impact on organisational outcomes: a systematic review, Working paper Cranfield School of Management  ...  (1998) Neely et al, (1995) Otley (1999) Rogers (1990) TOTAL PERCENTAGE 1.  ...  (1998) Neely et al, (1995) Otley (1999) Rogers (1990) TOTAL PERCENTAGE 1.  ... 
doi:10.1108/01443570710763778 fatcat:p7zqfvj6djewfbwkkrohu2bagy

Development of Focusing Plasma Mirrors for Ultraintense Laser-Driven Particle and Radiation Sources

Robbie Wilson, Martin King, Ross Gray, David Carroll, Rachel Dance, Nicholas Butler, Chris Armstrong, Steve Hawkes, Robert Clarke, David Robertson, Cyril Bourgenot, David Neely (+1 others)
2018 Quantum Beam Science  
doi:10.3390/qubs2010001 fatcat:7orzbssbyregvcg5ejif5oispu

Modification of the CpsA Protein Reveals a Role in Alteration of the Streptococcus agalactiae Cell Envelope

Hannah M. Rowe, Brett R. Hanson, Donna L. Runft, Qian Lin, Steve M. Firestine, Melody N. Neely, A. Camilli
2015 Infection and Immunity  
Neely and H. M. Rowe, U.S. patent application 62/066,215).  ... 
doi:10.1128/iai.02656-14 pmid:25644003 pmcid:PMC4363402 fatcat:w3dfcapajnacznd6e3wrxvlqm4
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