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Intolerant Bodies: A Short History of Autoimmunity by Warwick Anderson and Ian R. Mackay

Robert Aronowitz
2016 Bulletin of The History of Medicine  
Warwick Anderson and Ian R. Mackay. Intolerant Bodies: A Short History of Autoimmunity. Biographies of Disease.  ...  Robert Aronowitz University of Pennsylvania  ... 
doi:10.1353/bhm.2016.0031 fatcat:vm4rgdwrgvcw3de7z63fzu2waa

FOAM

Michael Tobis, Chad Schafer, Ian Foster, Robert Jacob, John Anderson
1997 Proceedings of the 1997 ACM/IEEE conference on Supercomputing (CDROM) - Supercomputing '97  
The FOAM Ocean Model FOAM uses the parallel ocean model developed at the University of Wisconsin -Madison by Anderson and Tobis [1] .  ...  Robert Jacob is a dissertator at the Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and a research assistant at the Space  ...  Ian Foster is a scientist in the Mathematics and Computer Science division at Argonne National Laboratory and an associate professor of computer science at the University of Chicago.  ... 
doi:10.1145/509593.509620 dblp:conf/sc/TobisSFJA97 fatcat:7p6woqidxbdytdunsqo4s6gpde

Size-Dependent Structural Distortions in One-Dimensional Nanostructures

Michael D. Anderson, Colby L. Heideman, Qiyin Lin, Mary Smeller, Robert Kokenyesi, Andrew A. Herzing, Ian M. Anderson, Douglas A. Keszler, Paul Zschack, David C. Johnson
2013 Angewandte Chemie  
Nanoscale materials have been intensely studied since the discovery that the optical properties of semiconductor nanoparticles are size dependent. [1] [2] [3] This and subsequent research has demonstrated that a given physical property of a particle exhibits a size dependence when the size becomes comparable to its characteristic length scale. Examples of relevant length scales include the de Broglie wavelength and/or the mean free path of electrons, phonons, and elementary excitations, all of
more » ... hich typically range from one to a few hundred nanometers. The ability to tune a wide variety of properties by controlling the particle size has spurred the development of novel chemistries for preparing nanostructured elements and compounds with goals of precisely controlling size, shape, and ligand shell. [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] As the size of a nanocrystal decreases, the ratio of bulk to surface atoms decreases. This progression increases the relative contribution of the surface free-energy relative to the volume free-energy of the bulk structure, such that distortions from bulk equilibrium structures might be expected as the nanoparticle size decreases. Unfortunately, while researchers have demonstrated the ability to prepare ordered lattices of nanoparticles, [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] the isolation of lattices of nanoparticles with long-range atomic periodicity is rare. [11, 13, 15] Hence detailed atomic structures and, in turn, the size-structure-property relationships of most nanoparticle systems cannot readily be determined. [15] [16] [17] Recently we reported that the intergrown compounds [(MSe) 1+y ] m (TSe 2 ) n , with M = {Pb, Bi, Ce} and T = {W, Nb, Ta} self-assemble from designed precursors. [18, 19] The values of m and n represent, respectively, the number of MSe and TSe 2 structural units of the unit cell of the superstructure and y describes the misfit between these structural units. As reported herein, the long-range structural order along the modulation direction permits us to determine the atomic structure of these precisely defined one-dimensional (1D) nanolaminate structures as a function of m and n using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging and X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Rietveld refinement. STEM-HAADF images of the first five [(PbSe) 1.00 ] m -(MoSe 2 ) n compounds in the family where m = n are shown in Figure 1 along with aggregate intensity plots used to quantify the PbSe intra-and inter-pair distances. All have a regular periodic structure along the modulated axis with well-defined layers of PbSe and MoSe 2 . The STEM images show ordered domains of PbSe with characteristic dimensions of a single structural unit along the layering direction and tens of nanometers perpendicular to the layering direction, with random in-plane rotational variants both within a layer and between layers. The orientations of the MoSe 2 domains are more difficult to discern from the STEM images, but rotational variants have been observed between individual MoSe 2 structural units. The STEM-HAADF images reveal a distortion of the PbSe layers, with the atomic planes grouped into pairs rather than being evenly spaced as expected for the equilibrium (bulk) rock salt structure. The distortion is most evident in the structural variant (m, n) = (2, 2) and decreases in magnitude until it can no longer be observed for (5, 5).
doi:10.1002/ange.201207825 fatcat:6xa7no7aubbfbljfd3ow747cle

Monte Carlo Simulation Experiments for Engineering Optimisation

Robert Anderson, Zhou Wei, Ian Cox, Malcolm Moore, Florence Kussener
2015 Studies in Engineering and Technology  
See Moore, Anderson and Kay (2015) for a discussion of the benefits of DoE and the types of scientific and engineering problems that can be solved with DoE.  ... 
doi:10.11114/set.v2i1.901 fatcat:obnurbd4lzgszc6irexautc36u

Size-Dependent Structural Distortions in One-Dimensional Nanostructures

Michael D. Anderson, Colby L. Heideman, Qiyin Lin, Mary Smeller, Robert Kokenyesi, Andrew A. Herzing, Ian M. Anderson, Douglas A. Keszler, Paul Zschack, David C. Johnson
2013 Angewandte Chemie International Edition  
Nanoscale materials have been intensely studied since the discovery that the optical properties of semiconductor nanoparticles are size dependent. [1] [2] [3] This and subsequent research has demonstrated that a given physical property of a particle exhibits a size dependence when the size becomes comparable to its characteristic length scale. Examples of relevant length scales include the de Broglie wavelength and/or the mean free path of electrons, phonons, and elementary excitations, all of
more » ... hich typically range from one to a few hundred nanometers. The ability to tune a wide variety of properties by controlling the particle size has spurred the development of novel chemistries for preparing nanostructured elements and compounds with goals of precisely controlling size, shape, and ligand shell. [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] As the size of a nanocrystal decreases, the ratio of bulk to surface atoms decreases. This progression increases the relative contribution of the surface free-energy relative to the volume free-energy of the bulk structure, such that distortions from bulk equilibrium structures might be expected as the nanoparticle size decreases. Unfortunately, while researchers have demonstrated the ability to prepare ordered lattices of nanoparticles, [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] the isolation of lattices of nanoparticles with long-range atomic periodicity is rare. [11, 13, 15] Hence detailed atomic structures and, in turn, the size-structure-property relationships of most nanoparticle systems cannot readily be determined. [15] [16] [17] Recently we reported that the intergrown compounds [(MSe) 1+y ] m (TSe 2 ) n , with M = {Pb, Bi, Ce} and T = {W, Nb, Ta} self-assemble from designed precursors. [18, 19] The values of m and n represent, respectively, the number of MSe and TSe 2 structural units of the unit cell of the superstructure and y describes the misfit between these structural units. As reported herein, the long-range structural order along the modulation direction permits us to determine the atomic structure of these precisely defined one-dimensional (1D) nanolaminate structures as a function of m and n using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging and X-ray diffraction (XRD) with Rietveld refinement. STEM-HAADF images of the first five [(PbSe) 1.00 ] m -(MoSe 2 ) n compounds in the family where m = n are shown in Figure 1 along with aggregate intensity plots used to quantify the PbSe intra-and inter-pair distances. All have a regular periodic structure along the modulated axis with well-defined layers of PbSe and MoSe 2 . The STEM images show ordered domains of PbSe with characteristic dimensions of a single structural unit along the layering direction and tens of nanometers perpendicular to the layering direction, with random in-plane rotational variants both within a layer and between layers. The orientations of the MoSe 2 domains are more difficult to discern from the STEM images, but rotational variants have been observed between individual MoSe 2 structural units. The STEM-HAADF images reveal a distortion of the PbSe layers, with the atomic planes grouped into pairs rather than being evenly spaced as expected for the equilibrium (bulk) rock salt structure. The distortion is most evident in the structural variant (m, n) = (2, 2) and decreases in magnitude until it can no longer be observed for (5, 5).
doi:10.1002/anie.201207825 pmid:23296571 fatcat:m3yjp4dz6ngjxnvdm37tnjfsue

Computational Design and Performance of the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model, Version One [chapter]

Robert Jacob, Chad Schafer, Ian Foster, Michael Tobis, John Anderson
2001 Lecture Notes in Computer Science  
The Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) is a climate system model intended for application to climate science questions that require long simulations. FOAM is a distributed-memory parallel climate model consisting of parallel general circulation models of the atmosphere and ocean with complete physics paramaterizations as well as sea-ice, land surface, and river transport models. FOAM's coupling strategy was chosen for high throughput (simulated years per day). A new coupler was written for FOAM
more » ... and some modifications were required of the component models. Performance data for FOAM on the IBM SP3 and SGI Origin2000 demonstrates that it can simulate over thirty years per day on modest numbers of processors.
doi:10.1007/3-540-45545-0_26 fatcat:34cbbyn6f5h2hlr2rzluosqlw4

Urine Metabolomics Analysis for Kidney Cancer Detection and Biomarker Discovery

Kyoungmi Kim, Pavel Aronov, Stanislav O. Zakharkin, Danielle Anderson, Bertrand Perroud, Ian M. Thompson, Robert H. Weiss
2008 Molecular & Cellular Proteomics  
Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 11,000 deaths per year in the United States. When detected early, generally serendipitously by imaging conducted for other reasons, long term survival is generally excellent. When detected with symptoms, prognosis is poor. Under these circumstances, a screening biomarker has the potential for substantial public health benefit. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of urine metabolomics analysis for metabolomic profiling, identification of
more » ... iomarkers, and ultimately for devising a urine screening test for RCC. Fifty urine samples were obtained from RCC and control patients from two institutions, and in a separate study, urine samples were taken from 13 normal individuals. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography-mass spectrometry was performed to identify small molecule metabolites present in each sample. Cluster analysis, principal components analysis, linear discriminant analysis, differential analysis, and variance component analysis were used to analyze the data. Previous work is extended to confirm the effectiveness of urine metabolomics analysis using a larger and more diverse patient cohort. It is now shown that the utility of this technique is dependent on the site of urine collection and that there exist substantial sources of variation of the urinary metabolomic profile, although group variation is sufficient to yield viable biomarkers. Surprisingly there is a small degree of variation in the urinary metabolomic profile in normal patients due to time since the last meal, and there is little difference in the urinary metabolomic profile in a cohort of pre-and postnephrectomy (partial or radical) renal cell carcinoma patients, suggesting that metabolic changes associated with RCC persist after removal of the primary tumor. After further investigations relating to the discovery and identity of individual biomarkers and attenuation of residual sources of variation, our work shows that urine metabolomics analysis has potential to lead to a diagnostic assay for RCC. Molecular & Cellular Proteomics 8:558 -570, 2009.
doi:10.1074/mcp.m800165-mcp200 pmid:19008263 pmcid:PMC2649817 fatcat:dr6yoyp2nvds5jyrpyaz4hx3ni

Blood microvasculature and lymphatic densities in endometrial polyps and adjacent and distant endometrium

Njume Peter Nijkang, Lyndal Anderson, Robert Markham, Ian Stewart Fraser, Frank Manconi
2018 SAGE Open Medicine  
ORCID iD Lyndal Anderson https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9405-8195  ... 
doi:10.1177/2050312118761287 pmid:29568523 pmcid:PMC5858742 fatcat:fzlms77mnvea7leoxngcpqta5m

Endoscopy by nonphysicians

Steven O. Ikenberry, Michelle A. Anderson, Subhas Banerjee, Todd H. Baron, Jason A. Dominitz, Seng-Ian Gan, M. Edwyn Harrison, Sanjay Jagannath, Michael Levy, David Lichtenstein, Bo Shen, Robert D. Fanelli (+2 others)
2009 Gastrointestinal Endoscopy  
doi:10.1016/j.gie.2008.11.006 pmid:19327469 fatcat:hszzgwwzuzhk3njc4kxu3t4bne

Characterization of pRAS1-like plasmids from atypical North American psychrophilicAeromonas salmonicida

Christina Casas, Elizabeth C. Anderson, Kayode K. Ojo, Ian Keith, Daryl Whelan, Don Rainnie, Marilyn C. Roberts
2005 FEMS Microbiology Letters  
Atypical psychrophilic Aeromonas salmonicida isolates were obtained from farmed and wild fish in Northeastern North America. These bacteria were isolated between 1992 and 2001 and carried tetracycline resistance (Tc r ) plasmids of approximately 58 kb. The nine isolates had plasmids which could be divided into four groups based on the specific tetracycline resistance (tet) gene carried [tet(A) or tet(B)], incompatibility of the plasmid [IncU or other], whether the plasmid carried the IS6100
more » ... ences, the sul1 gene, coding for sulfonamide resistance, the dfrA16 gene, coding for trimethoprim resistance, and/or carried a complete Tn1721, and their ability to transfer their Tc r plasmids to an Escherichia coli recipient at 15°C. Five of the isolates, with genetically related Tc r plasmids, were able to transfer their plasmids to an E. coli recipient at frequencies ranging from 5.7 · 10 À4 to 2.8 · 10 À6 per recipient. The 1992 isolate carried a genetically distinct plasmid, which transferred at a slightly higher rate. The three remaining isolates carried one of two genetically different plasmids, which were unable to transfer to an E. coli recipient. Conjugal transfer at 15°C is the lowest temperature that has been documented in bacteria.
doi:10.1016/j.femsle.2004.10.039 pmid:15621420 fatcat:bwb3ywcqzrez7ae7az4762vyyi

High-dose thiopentone for open-chamber cardiac surgery: a retrospective review

Edward A. Pascoe, Robert J. Hudson, Brian A. Anderson, Diamond A. Kassum, Ailsa Shanks, Morley Rosenbloom, Ian R. Thomson
1996 Canadian Journal of Anesthesia  
Purpose: High-dose thiopentone has been reported to reduce the incidence of neurological dysfunction after open-chamber cardiac surgery. However, this technique delays tracheal extubation and increases requirements for inotropic support after cardiopulmonary bypass. As a quality assurance measure to determine the safety of high-dose thiopentone, we reviewed the records of all patients undergoing elective, open-chamber surgery at our institution between Ist March,. 1987 and 31st Dec', 1989.
more » ... ds: The charts of 236 patients were reviewed retrospectively, and 227 met our inclusion criteria. The perioperative characteristics of patients anaesthetized with thiopentone (Group 7", n = 80) were compared with those of patients anaesthetized with opioids (Group O, n = 147). Results: Anaesthetic technique was chosen by the attending anaesthetist. In Group T (n = 80) thiopentone 38. I • 1 !.8 mg.kg -t was infused to produce electroencephalographic burst-suppression during bypass. Moderate hypothermia and arterial line filtration were used during bypass. The ~roups did not differ with respect to demographics, type of surgery, or conduct ~ bypass. There were no strokes in Group T and 4 in Group 0 (P = NS). The time to extubation was prolonged in Group T compared with Group 0 (39 • 51 vs 27 • 24 h, P =
doi:10.1007/bf03011769 pmid:8773863 fatcat:ppjydyspy5el3a5r3ia6rwdkwe

Sedation and anesthesia in GI endoscopy

David R. Lichtenstein, Sanjay Jagannath, Todd H. Baron, Michelle A. Anderson, Subhas Banerjee, Jason A. Dominitz, Robert D. Fanelli, S. Ian Gan, M. Edwyn Harrison, Steven O. Ikenberry, Bo Shen, Leslie Stewart (+2 others)
2008 Gastrointestinal Endoscopy  
doi:10.1016/j.gie.2008.09.029 pmid:18984096 fatcat:cpyorefgejexlnlgmo43tx5g4i

Traumatic Injury of the Superior Mesenteric Vein: Ligate, Repair or Shunt?

Chad G. Ball, Andrew W. Kirkpatrick, Matthew Smith, Robert H. Mulloy, Leonard Tse, Ian B. Anderson
2007 European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery  
We report a case of SMV injury in a critically ill patient. The patient was a 19-year-old woman involved in a motor vehicle collision. Her injuries included grade II splenic and renal lacerations, devascularized and lac erated right and transverse colon, a transected trans verse mesocolon, a massive shear injury of her abdominal wall, and two partial SMV transections. At initial damage control laparotomy, the SMV was ligated, the devascularized bowel resected and a temporary abdominal closure
more » ... plied. At re-operation, a mesocaval shunt using saphenous vein was employed. The shunt failed and the patient required a saphenous vein jump graft. Although visceral vascular injuries are rare, ligation of the SMV in a damage control situation is acceptable. This case study is the first to discuss appropriate treatment when interrup tion to a patient's collateral visceral venous drainage limits the surgeon's ability to ligate. In these situa tions, bypass shunts may be successful.
doi:10.1007/s00068-007-6108-7 pmid:26814941 fatcat:qxlo7lcweraqnm2nwdchm6tpdi

Differentiated melanocyte cell division occurs in vivo and is promoted by mutations in Mitf

Kerrie L. Taylor, James A. Lister, Zhiqiang Zeng, Hironori Ishizaki, Caroline Anderson, Robert N. Kelsh, Ian J. Jackson, E. Elizabeth Patton
2011 Development  
Coordination of cell proliferation and differentiation is crucial for tissue formation, repair and regeneration. Some tissues, such as skin and blood, depend on differentiation of a pluripotent stem cell population, whereas others depend on the division of differentiated cells. In development and in the hair follicle, pigmented melanocytes are derived from undifferentiated precursor cells or stem cells. However, differentiated melanocytes may also have proliferative capacity in animals, and the
more » ... potential for differentiated melanocyte cell division in development and regeneration remains largely unexplored. Here, we use time-lapse imaging of the developing zebrafish to show that while most melanocytes arise from undifferentiated precursor cells, an unexpected subpopulation of differentiated melanocytes arises by cell division. Depletion of the overall melanocyte population triggers a regeneration phase in which differentiated melanocyte division is significantly enhanced, particularly in young differentiated melanocytes. Additionally, we find reduced levels of Mitf activity using an mitfa temperature-sensitive line results in a dramatic increase in differentiated melanocyte cell division. This supports models that in addition to promoting differentiation, Mitf also promotes withdrawal from the cell cycle. We suggest differentiated cell division is relevant to melanoma progression because the human melanoma mutation MITF 4T⌬2B promotes increased and serial differentiated melanocyte division in zebrafish. These results reveal a novel pathway of differentiated melanocyte division in vivo, and that Mitf activity is essential for maintaining cell cycle arrest in differentiated melanocytes.
doi:10.1242/dev.064014 pmid:21771814 pmcid:PMC3143570 fatcat:b26rvlus2jajdphlun24msfpei

Ventriculoarterial septal defect with separate aortic and pulmonary valves, but common ventriculoarterial junction

Victor T. Tsang, Nicholas Kang, Ian Sullivan, Jan Marek, Robert H. Anderson
2008 Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery  
Figure 1. Drawing showing a window* between the sinuses of the aorta and pulmonary trunk proximal to the orifices of the coronary arteries, in addition to the DcVSD (arrow). PA, Pulmonary artery; AO, aorta; RV, right ventricle; LV, left ventricle. Brief Communications Figure 2. Echocardiogram at 51 months follow-up. RVOT, Right ventricular outflow tract; RA, right atrium; AO, aorta; PA, pulmonary artery; RV, right ventricle.
doi:10.1016/j.jtcvs.2007.07.056 pmid:18179953 fatcat:6pnydnua25dmhgxel3fgd5ukyy
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