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Erratum to: Hydrogeochemical investigations in a drained lake area: the case of Xynias basin (Central Greece)

Nikos Charizopoulos, Eleni Zagana, Georgios Stamatis
2016 Environmental Monitoring & Assessment  
doi:10.1007/s10661-016-5538-2 pmid:27640162 fatcat:6tynpo7urnchbapz2makgxbg7m

Earth Observation and GIS-Based Analysis for Landslide Susceptibility and Risk Assessment

Emmanouil Psomiadis, Nikos Charizopoulos, Nikolaos Efthimiou, Konstantinos X. Soulis, Ioannis Charalampopoulos
2020 ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information  
Landslides can cause severe problems to the social and economic well-being. In order to effectively mitigate landslide hazards, the development of detailed susceptibility maps is required, towards implementing targeted risk management plans. This study aims to create detailed landslide susceptibility (LS) and landslide risk (LR) maps of the Sperchios River basin by applying an expert semi-quantitative approach that integrates the Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based multicriteria analysis
more » ... and Earth Observation (EO) data. Adopting the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) for a weighted linear combination (WLC) approach, eleven evaluation parameters were selected. The results were validated using a historic landslide database, enriched with new landslide locations mapped by satellite and aerial imagery interpretation and field surveys. Moreover, the landslide risk map of the area was also developed, based on the LS delineation, considering additionally the anthropogenic exposure and overall vulnerability of the area. The results showed that the most susceptible areas are located at the west and south-west regions of the basin. The synergistic use of GIS-based analysis and EO data can provide a useful tool for the design of natural hazards prevention policy at highly susceptible to risk landslide risk areas.
doi:10.3390/ijgi9090552 fatcat:wbamgf65qrcdla5lik6ovs75le

Implementation of nature-based solutions for flood & drought risks reduction using Numerical Modelling

Debele Sisay, Sahani Jeetendra, Soini Katriina, Menenti Massimo, GonzalezOllauri Alejandro, Alfieri Silvia Maria, Bowyer Paul, Spyrou Christos, Charizopoulos Nikos, Loupis Michael, Di Sabatino Silvana, Kumar Prashant
2021 Zenodo  
Nature-based solutions (NBS) for climate change adaptation and natural hazard management are receiving much attention in Europe and across the world. It is now seen broadly as a valid measure to manage flood risk sustainably whilst providing significant multiple benefits. However, there is little information regarding its implementation and cost-effectiveness in reducing flood hazard at the watershed scale. This work focuses on NBS for flood risk management along with its challenges,
more » ... es and advancement. A comprehensive list of NBS used against flood risks was reviewed and the four best NBS – which are effective and economical under current and future climate change scenarios were selected based on multi-criteria decision-making process, and their suitability were tested through physical modelling. The design, optimal allocation and implementation procedures as well as the cost-benefit analyses were presented for the individual NBS. Probability distribution function (GEV model) was used to perform cost-benefit analysis (total expected cost including damage and construction) and flood estimation with and without NBS in place. The analyses showed that the performance and cost-effectiveness of NBS was lesser for short duration while the net benefits increased with time and became higher for the long duration. We formulated a recommended protocol based on the identified challenges, gaps and success for designing robust and effective NBS, its implementation, monitoring, evaluation, uptake and replication which could inform engineers, landscape architects, city planners, policy/decision-makers. This study builds up solid evidence base showcasing the benefits of flood NBS ensuring long-term sustainability and supply of ecosystem-services.
doi:10.5281/zenodo.5535369 fatcat:yd3g46ier5flpae4l5brxnmvie

Potential Dam Breach Analysis and Flood Wave Risk Assessment Using HEC-RAS and Remote Sensing Data: A Multicriteria Approach

Emmanouil Psomiadis, Lefteris Tomanis, Antonis Kavvadias, Konstantinos X. Soulis, Nikos Charizopoulos, Spyros Michas
2021 Water  
Dam breach has disastrous consequences for the economy and human lives. Floods are one of the most damaging natural phenomena, and some of the most catastrophic flash floods are related to dam collapses. The goal of the present study is to analyse the impact of a possible failure–collapse on a potentially affected area downstream of the existing Bramianos dam on southern Crete Island. HEC-RAS hydraulic analysis software was used to study the dam breach, the flood wave propagation, and estimate
more » ... he extent of floods. The analysis was performed using two different relief datasets of the same area: a digital elevation model (DEM) taken from very high-resolution orthophoto images (OPH) of the National Cadastre and Mapping Agency SA and a detailed digital surface model (DSM) extracted from aerial images taken by an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV). Remote sensing data of the Sentinel-2 satellite and OPH were utilised to create the geographic information system (GIS) layers of a thorough land use/cover classification (LULC) for the potentially flooded area, which was used to assess the impact of the flood wave. Different dam breach and flood scenarios, where the water flows over man-made structures, settlements, and olive tree cultivations, were also examined. The study area is dominated mainly by three geological formations with different hydrogeological characteristics that dictated the positioning and structure of the dam and determine the processes that shape the geomorphology and surface roughness of the floodplain, affecting flow conditions. The results show that the impact of a potential dam break at Bramianos dam is serious, and appropriate management measures should be taken to reduce the risk. The water flow downstream of the collapsed dam depends on the water volume stored in the reservoir. Moreover, the comparison of DSM and DEM cases shows that the detailed DSM may indicate more accurately the surface relief and existing natural obstacles such as vegetation, buildings, and greenhouses, enabling more realistic hydraulic simulation results. Dam breach flood simulations and innovative remote sensing data can provide valuable outcomes for engineers and stakeholders for decision-making and planning in order to confront the consequences of similar incidents worldwide.
doi:10.3390/w13030364 fatcat:ihuubsfrtzhvheaeneylb7wzg4

The Use of Stochastic Models for Short-Term Prediction of Water Parameters of the Thesaurus Dam, River Nestos, Greece

Antonis Sentas, Lina Karamoutsou, Nikos Charizopoulos, Thomas Psilovikos, Aris Psilovikos, Athanasios Loukas
2018 Proceedings (MDPI)  
The scope of this paper is to evaluate the short-term predictive capacity of the stochastic models ARIMA, Transfer Function (TF) and Artificial Neural Networks for water parameters, specifically for 1, 2 and 3 steps forward (m = 1, 2 and 3). The comparison of statistical parameters indicated that ARIMA models could be proposed as short-term prediction models. In some cases that TF models resulted in better predictions, the difference with ARIMA was minimal and since the latter are simpler in
more » ... ir construction, they are proposed for short-term prediction. Artificial Neural Networks didn't show a good short-term predictive capacity in comparison with the aforementioned models.
doi:10.3390/proceedings2110634 fatcat:ep2npxhppva4hn2am7lnnfrxgu

Investigating the Correlation of Tectonic and Morphometric Characteristics with the Hydrological Response in a Greek River Catchment Using Earth Observation and Geospatial Analysis Techniques

Emmanouil Psomiadis, Nikos Charizopoulos, Konstantinos X. Soulis, Nikolaos Efthimiou
2020 Geosciences  
[12] , Charizopoulos et al. [29] , and Ntokos [30] .  ... 
doi:10.3390/geosciences10090377 fatcat:cspndk3v7fgbzfvpuslk6mqd4i

An overview of monitoring methods for assessing the performance of nature-based solutions against natural hazards

Prashant Kumar, Sisay E. Debele, Jeetendra Sahani, Nidhi Rawat, Belen Marti-Cardona, Silvia Maria Alfieri, Bidroha Basu, Arunima Sarkar Basu, Paul Bowyer, Nikos Charizopoulos, Juvonen Jaakko, Michael Loupis (+11 others)
2021 Zenodo  
To bring to fruition the capability of nature-based solutions (NBS) in mitigating hydro-meteorological risks (HMRs) and facilitate their widespread uptake require a consolidated knowledge-base related to their monitoring methods, efficiency, functioning and the ecosystem services they provide. We attempt to fill this knowledge gap by reviewing and compiling the existing scientific literature on methods, including ground-based measurements (e.g. gauging stations, wireless sensor network) and
more » ... te sensing observations (e.g. from topographic LiDAR, multispectral and radar sensors) that have been used and/or can be relevant to monitor the performance of NBS against five HMRs: floods, droughts, heatwaves, landslides, and storm surges and coastal erosion. These can allow the mapping of the risks and impacts of the specific hydro-meteorological events. We found that the selection and application of monitoring methods mostly rely on the particular NBS being monitored, resource availability (e.g. time, budget, space) and type of HMRs. No standalone method currently exists that can allow monitoring the performance of NBS in its broadest view. However, equipments, tools and technologies developed for other purposes, such as for ground-based measurements and atmospheric observations, can be applied to accurately monitor the performance of NBS to mitigate HMRs. We also focused on the capabilities of passive and active remote sensing, pointing out their associated opportunities and difficulties for NBS monitoring application. We conclude that the advancement in airborne and satellite-based remote sensing technology has signified a leap in the systematic monitoring of NBS performance, as well as provided a robust way for the spatial and temporal comparison of NBS intervention versus its absence. This improved performance measurement can support the evaluation of existing uncertainty and scepticism in selecting NBS over the artificially built concrete structures or grey approaches by addressing the questions of performance pre [...]
doi:10.5281/zenodo.4668721 fatcat:njawzczes5byvafib6252lvpeu

Towards an operationalisation of nature-based solutions for natural hazards

Prashant Kumar, Sisay Debele, Jeetendra Sahani, Leonardo Aragão, Francesca Barisani, Bidroha Basu, Edoardo Bucchignani, Nikos Charizopoulos, Silvana Di Sabatino, Alessio Domeneghetti, Albert Sorolla Edo, Leena Finér (+19 others)
2020 Zenodo  
Nature-based solutions (NBS) are being promoted as adaptive measures against predicted increasing hydrometeorological hazards (HMHs), such as heatwaves and floods which have already caused significant loss of life and economic damage across the globe. However, the underpinning factors such as policy framework, end-users' interests and participation for NBS design and operationalisation are yet to be established. We discuss the operationalisation and implementation processes of NBS by means of a
more » ... novel concept of Open-Air Laboratories (OAL) for its wider acceptance. The design and implementation of environmentally, economically, technically and socio-culturally sustainable NBS require inter- and transdisciplinary approaches which could be achieved by fostering co-creation processes by engaging stakeholders across various sectors and levels, inspiring more effective use of skills, diverse knowledge, manpower and resources, and connecting and harmonising the adaptation aims. The OAL serves as a benchmark for NBS upscaling, replication and exploitation in policy-making process through monitoring by field measurement, evaluation by key performance indicators and building solid evidence on their short- and long-term multiple benefits in different climatic, environmental and socioeconomic conditions, thereby alleviating the challenges of political resistance, financial barriers and lack of knowledge. We conclude that holistic management of HMHs by effective use of NBS can be achieved with standard-compliant data for replicating and monitoring NBS in OALs, knowledge about policy silos and interaction between research communities and end-users. Further research is needed for multi-risk analysis of HMHs and inclusion of NBS into policy frameworks, adaptable at local, regional and national scales leading to modification in the prevalent guidelines related to HMHs. The findings of this work can be used for developing synergies between current policy frameworks, scientific research and practical implementation of NBS in Europe [...]
doi:10.5281/zenodo.3902861 fatcat:rpciagps3rdcpbttaxboqgdiwq

An overview of monitoring methods for assessing the performance of nature-based solutions against natural hazards

Prashant Kumar, Sisay E. Debele, Jeetendra Sahani, Nidhi Rawat, Belen Marti-Cardona, Silvia Maria Alfieri, Bidroha Basu, Arunima Sarkar Basu, Paul Bowyer, Nikos Charizopoulos, Juvonen Jaakko, Michael Loupis (+12 others)
2021 Earth-Science Reviews  
temporal comparison of NBS intervention versus its absence. This improved performance measurement can support the evaluation of existing uncertainty and scepticism in selecting NBS over the artificially built concrete structures or grey approaches by addressing the questions of performance precariousness. Remote sensing technical developments, however, take time to shift toward a state of operational readiness for monitoring the progress of NBS in place (e.g. green NBS growth rate, their
more » ... and effectiveness through time). More research is required to develop a holistic approach, which could routinely and continually monitor the performance of NBS over a large scale of intervention. This performance evaluation could increase the ecological and socio-economic benefits of NBS, and also create high levels of their acceptance and confidence by overcoming potential scepticism of NBS implementations.
doi:10.1016/j.earscirev.2021.103603 fatcat:iu67dsgnznhjph7gjgtckxtqzi

Nature-based solutions efficiency evaluation against natural hazards: Modelling methods, advantages and limitations

Prashant Kumar, Sisay E. Debele, Jeetendra Sahani, Nidhi Rawat, Belen Marti-Cardona, Silvia Maria Alfieri, Bidroha Basu, Arunima Sarkar Basu, Paul Bowyer, Nikos Charizopoulos, Glauco Gallotti, Juvonen Jaakko (+15 others)
2021 Science of the Total Environment  
Nature-based solutions (NBS) for hydro-meteorological risks (HMRs) reduction and management are becoming increasingly popular, but challenges such as the lack of well-recognised standard methodologies to evaluate their performance and upscale their implementation remain. We systematically evaluate the current state-of-the art on the models and tools that are utilised for the optimum allocation, design and efficiency evaluation of NBS for five HMRs (flooding, droughts, heatwaves, landslides, and
more » ... storm surges and coastal erosion). We found that methods to assess the complex issue of NBS efficiency and cost-benefits analysis are still in the development stage and they have only been implemented through the methodologies developed for other purposes such as fluid dynamics models in micro and catchment scale contexts. Of the reviewed numerical models and tools MIKE-SHE, SWMM (for floods), ParFlow-TREES, ACRU, SIMGRO (for droughts), WRF, ENVI-met (for heatwaves), FUNWAVE-TVD, BROOK90 (for landslides), TELEMAC and ADCIRC (for storm surges) are more flexible to evaluate the performance and effectiveness of specific NBS such as wetlands, ponds, trees, parks, grass, green roof/walls, tree roots, vegetations, coral reefs, mangroves, sea grasses, oyster reefs, sea salt marshes, sandy beaches and dunes. We conclude that the models and tools that are capable of assessing the multiple benefits, particularly the performance and cost-effectiveness of NBS for HMR reduction and management are not readily available. Thus, our synthesis of modelling methods can facilitate their selection that can maximise opportunities and refute the current political hesitation of NBS deployment compared with grey solutions for HMR management but also for the provision of a wide range of social and economic co-benefits. However, there is still a need for bespoke modelling tools that can holistically assess the various components of NBS from an HMR reduction and management perspective. Such tools can facilitate impact assessment modelling under different NBS scenarios to build a solid evidence base for upscaling and replicating the implementation of NBS.
doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2021.147058 pmid:34088074 fatcat:o6ciohdx6rfljlzyfcd5gzdow4

Towards an operationalisation of nature-based solutions for natural hazards

Prashant Kumar, Sisay E. Debele, Jeetendra Sahani, Leonardo Aragão, Francesca Barisani, Bidroha Basu, Edoardo Bucchignani, Nikos Charizopoulos, Silvana Di Sabatino, Alessio Domeneghetti, Albert Sorolla Edo, Leena Finér (+19 others)
2020 Science of the Total Environment  
Nature-based solutions (NBS) are being promoted as adaptive measures against predicted increasing hydrometeorological hazards (HMHs), such as heatwaves and floods which have already caused significant loss of life and economic damage across the globe. However, the underpinning factors such as policy framework, end-users' interests and participation for NBS design and operationalisation are yet to be established. We discuss the operationalisation and implementation processes of NBS by means of a
more » ... novel concept of Open-Air Laboratories (OAL) for its wider acceptance. The design and implementation of environmentally, economically, technically and socio-culturally sustainable NBS require inter- and transdisciplinary approaches which could be achieved by fostering co-creation processes by engaging stakeholders across various sectors and levels, inspiring more effective use of skills, diverse knowledge, manpower and resources, and connecting and harmonising the adaptation aims. The OAL serves as a benchmark for NBS upscaling, replication and exploitation in policy-making process through monitoring by field measurement, evaluation by key performance indicators and building solid evidence on their short- and long-term multiple benefits in different climatic, environmental and socio-economic conditions, thereby alleviating the challenges of political resistance, financial barriers and lack of knowledge. We conclude that holistic management of HMHs by effective use of NBS can be achieved with standard compliant data for replicating and monitoring NBS in OALs, knowledge about policy silos and interaction between research communities and end-users. Further research is needed for multi-risk analysis of HMHs and inclusion of NBS into policy frameworks, adaptable at local, regional and national scales leading to modification in the prevalent guidelines related to HMHs. The findings of this work can be used for developing synergies between current policy frameworks, scientific research and practical implementation of NBS in Europe and beyond for its wider acceptance.
doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2020.138855 pmid:32413653 fatcat:anikagmscvaudlheixph6wrcym