Filters








28 Hits in 0.95 sec

Pharmacokinetic Interaction Between Valproic Acid, Meropenem, and Risperidone

Michael Paulzen, Chin-Bin Eap, Gerhard Gründer, Maxim Kuzin
2016 Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology  
Paulzen declare no conflict of interests. Dr. Gründer has served as a consultant for AstraZeneca (London, UK), Bristol-Myers Squibb  ... 
doi:10.1097/jcp.0000000000000433 pmid:26658079 fatcat:6lpess575zh2dfvpw6cggovudy

Enhancement of atomoxetine serum levels by co-administration of paroxetine

Michael Paulzen, Hans-Willi Clement, Gerhard Gründer
2007 International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology  
doi:10.1017/s1461145707008115 pmid:18215333 fatcat:nvazcgs7rrcsjmzpc3y5btz7zy

Plasma Risperidone-related Measures in Children and Adolescents with Oppositional Defiant/Conduct Disorders

Daria Piacentino, Georgios D. Kotzalidis, Georgios Schoretsanitis, Michael Paulzen, Ekkehard Haen, Simone Cappelletti, Giancarlo Giupponi, Michael Grözinger, Andreas Conca
2020 Clinical Psychopharmacology and Neuroscience  
Kotzalidis https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0281-6324 Georgios Schoretsanitis https://orcid.org/0000-0002-3851-4117 Michael Paulzen https://orcid.org/0000-0003-4198-5160 Ekkehard Haen https://orcid.org  ...  Simone Cappelletti https://orcid.org/0000-0002-9331-4273 Giancarlo Giupponi https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6430-0000 Michael Grözinger https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8700-9646 Andreas Conca https://orcid.org  ... 
doi:10.9758/cpn.2020.18.1.41 pmid:31958904 pmcid:PMC7006987 fatcat:pzi47t2ajfb23beyd4yb2lubf4

Cytochrome P450-mediated interaction between perazine and risperidone: implications for antipsychotic polypharmacy

Michael Paulzen, Ekkehard Haen, Christoph Hiemke, Benedikt Stegmann, Sarah E. Lammertz, Gerhard Gründer, Georgios Schoretsanitis
2017 British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology  
For further details on the analytical method, see Paulzen et al. [34] . Statistical analysis The analysis included the comparison of two study groups, as defined above.  ... 
doi:10.1111/bcp.13255 pmid:28160505 pmcid:PMC5510064 fatcat:o7kwsiicdvhh7gai6wjzjxiy24

Serum concentrations of paliperidone versus risperidone and clinical effects

Yasmin Nazirizadeh, Friederike Vogel, Wolfgang Bader, Ekkehard Haen, Bruno Pfuhlmann, Gerhard Gründer, Michael Paulzen, Markus Schwarz, Gerald Zernig, Christoph Hiemke
2010 European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology  
Purpose The major aim of this multicenter retrospective analysis was to examine the relationship between paliperidone serum concentrations and clinical effects in patients treated with this new antipsychotic drug. Intra-individual variability in trough serum concentrations was also analyzed in patients under treatment with either the paliperidone-extended release (ER) formulation or the risperidone immediate-release formulation. Methods Data were obtained from 217 patients of four medical
more » ... s who were being followed by therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Serum concentrations were associated with clinical response using Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) scores. Results The mean concentration of paliperidone was 36± 25 ng/ml, and the mean dose corrected concentration (C/D) was 4.7±2.9 ng/ml/mg. Among patients receiving paliperidone as antipsychotic monotherapy and who showed at least a much improved level according to the CGI scores, the 25th-75th percentiles of paliperidone concentrations were 20-52 ng/ml; these were very similar to the recommended therapeutic range of 20-60 ng/ml for risperidone plus 9-hydroxy-risperidone (active moiety). In 13 patients treated with paliperidone ER and 17 patients treated with risperidone, all of whom had repeated drug measurements, the intra-and inter-individual variabilities of trough serum concentrations were similar for the paliperidone and risperidone active moiety, ranging between 30 and 35%. Conclusion Based on these results, we conclude that risperidone and paliperidone have a similar therapeutic range and similar intra-individual variability in terms of trough serum levels. For treatment optimization, monitoring of plasma concentrations may be as useful for paliperidone as for risperidone.
doi:10.1007/s00228-010-0812-7 pmid:20358189 fatcat:5p36lc4rcbchjktxl467zqhnhq

Plasma levels and cerebrospinal fluid penetration by duloxetine in a patient with a non-fatal overdose during a suicide attempt

Michael Paulzen, Christoph Hiemke, Gerhard Gründer
2009 International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology  
Michael Paulzen 1 , Christoph Hiemke 2 , Gerhard Grü nder 1 1 Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, RWTH, Aachen University, JARA -Translational Brain Medicine, Aachen, Germany 2 Department of Psychiatry  ...  Statement of Interest Dr Paulzen and Dr Grü nder have received grant support from Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN, USA.  ... 
doi:10.1017/s1461145709990484 pmid:19656434 fatcat:ifhmsduv2zhxzj4z7rg7hd4hyq

Pharmacokinetic Drug-Drug Interactions of Mood Stabilizers and Risperidone in Patients Under Combined Treatment

Georgios Schoretsanitis, Ekkehard Haen, Gerhard Gründer, Benedikt Stegmann, Koen R. J. Schruers, Christoph Hiemke, Sarah E. Lammertz, Michael Paulzen
2016 Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology  
The combination of anticonvulsant mood stabilizers with antipsychotic drugs may lead to clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. The objective of the study was to identify pharmacokinetic interactions of different mood stabilizers on the metabolism of risperidone (RIS) under natural conditions. Methods: A large therapeutic drug monitoring database containing plasma concentrations of RIS and its metabolite 9-hydroxy-RIS (9-OH-RIS) of 1,584 adult patients was analyzed. Four groups (n = 1,072)
more » ... ere compared: a control group without a potentially cytochrome interacting comedication (R 0 , n = 852), a group comedicated with valproate (VPA) (R VPA , n = 153), a group comedicated with lamotrigine (LMT) (R LMT , n = 46), and a group under concomitant medication with carbamazepine (CBZ) (R CBZ , n = 21). Dose-adjusted plasma concentrations (C/D ratio) for RIS, 9-OH-RIS and active moiety (AM) (RIS + 9-OH-RIS), as well as metabolic ratios (RIS/9-OH-RIS) were computed. Results: Groups did not differ with regard to the daily dosage (P = 0.46). Differences were detected for the distributions of the C/D ratios for RIS, 9-OH-RIS and AM (P = 0.003, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Differences remained significant after conducting a Bonferroni correction (P = 0.0125). Pairwise comparisons of the concomitant medication groups with the control group revealed significant differences; RIS C/D ratios were significantly higher in the VPA and the LMT group than in the control group (P = 0.013; P = 0.021). However, these differences did not remain significant after Bonferroni correction. In contrast, CBZ-treated patients showed lower dose-adjusted plasma concentrations of 9-OH-RIS (P < 0.001) as well as the AM (P < 0.001) than the control group; this difference survived the Bonferroni correction. Conclusions: The data give evidence for pharmacokinetic interactions between RIS and different anticonvulsant mood stabilizers. Carbamazepine decreased serum concentrations of 9-OH-RIS and the AM when compared with the control group. In case of VPA and LMT, findings were less significant; hints for a weak RIS metabolism inhibition by LMT of unclear clinical significance were found. Plasma concentration values for 9-OH-RIS and RIS + 9-OH-RIS in the R CBZ group were significantly lower than in the control group (uncorrected P = 0.001 and P = 0.001 for Mann-Whitney U Test). Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology • Volume 36, Number 6, December 2016 Risperidone Combined With Mood Stabilizers FIGURE 2. Median dose-adjusted plasma concentrations (C/D) for risperidone, 9-hydroxyrisperidone and active moiety in the different groups. R LMT = lamotrigine group; R VPA = valproate group; R CBZ = carbamazepine group; R 0 = control group. C/D for RIS, 9-OH-RIS and RIS + 9-OH-RIS in [(ng/ml)/mg].
doi:10.1097/jcp.0000000000000601 pmid:27811552 fatcat:fbmffg6guveo5kbvosea7hp4du

Pharmacokinetic considerations in the treatment of hypertension in risperidone-medicated patients – thinking of clinically relevant CYP2D6 interactions

Michael Paulzen, Ekkehard Haen, Gerhard Gründer, Sarah E Lammertz, Benedikt Stegmann, Koen RJ Schruers, Sebastian Walther, Georgios Schoretsanitis
2016 Journal of Psychopharmacology  
Treatment of arterial hypertension in patients with severe mental illnesses often results in polypharmacy, potentially leading to drug-drug interactions. The objective of the study was to analyse the in vivo inhibitory potential of two antihypertensive drugs, amlodipine and metoprolol on CYP2D6 catalysed 9-hydroxylation of risperidone (RIS). Methods: A therapeutic drug monitoring database with plasma concentrations of RIS and 9-hydroxyrisperidone (9-OH-RIS) of 1584 patients was analysed. Three
more » ... roups were considered; a group of patients receiving RIS without a potentially cytochrome influencing co-medication (control group, R 0 , n=852), a group co-medicated with amlodipine (R A , n=27) and a group, co-medicated with metoprolol (R M , n=41). Plasma concentrations, concentration-to-dose ratios (C/Ds) of RIS, 9-OH-RIS and the active moiety (AM), as well as the metabolic ratios were computed and compared using the Kruskal-Wallis test, the Mann-Whitney U test and the Jonckheere-Terpstra test to determine the means and different patterns of distribution of plasma concentrations as well as the concentration-to-dose ratios. Results: The median daily dosage of RIS did not differ between the groups (p=0.708). No differences were found in median plasma concentrations of RIS, 9-OH-RIS and AM. However, concentration-to-dose ratios for RIS, 9-OH-RIS and AM were significantly higher in the amlodipine group (p=0.025, p=0.048 and p=0.005). In the metoprolol group, the concentration-to-dose ratio for RIS was significantly higher than in the control group (p=0.017), while the C/D for 9-OH-RIS and AM was not. Conclusions and limitations: Our data show a potential pharmacokinetic interaction, most likely via CYP3A4 between amlodipine and RIS, reflected in significantly different C/Ds for RIS, 9-OH-RIS and AM. Although the interaction did not result in significantly higher plasma levels, changes in C/Ds and their distribution with regard to the median concentrations were observed.
doi:10.1177/0269881116650390 pmid:27251417 fatcat:vuyefd5h75ctnmpw535ckil7sa

Opiate-Induced Dopamine Release Is Modulated by Severity of Alcohol Dependence: An [18F]Fallypride Positron Emission Tomography Study

Katja N. Spreckelmeyer, Michael Paulzen, Mardjan Raptis, Thomas Baltus, Sabrina Schaffrath, Julia Van Waesberghe, Magdalena M. Zalewski, Frank Rösch, Ingo Vernaleken, Wolfgang M. Schäfer, Gerhard Gründer
2011 Biological Psychiatry  
Preclinical data implicate the reinforcing effects of alcohol to be mediated by interaction between the opioid and dopamine systems of the brain. Specifically, alcohol-induced release of ␤-endorphins stimulates -opioid receptors (MORs), which is believed to cause dopamine release in the brain reward system. Individual differences in opioid or dopamine neurotransmission have been suggested to be responsible for enhanced liability to abuse alcohol. In the present study, a single dose of the MOR
more » ... onist remifentanil was administered in detoxified alcohol-dependent patients and healthy control subjects to mimic the ␤-endorphin-releasing properties of ethanol and to assess the effects of direct MOR stimulation on dopamine release in the mesolimbic reward system. Methods: Availability of D 2/3 receptors was assessed before and after single-dose administration of the MOR agonist remifentanil in 11 detoxified alcohol-dependent patients and 11 healthy control subjects with positron emission tomography with the radiotracer [ 18 F]fallypride. Severity of dependence as assessed with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test was compared with remifentanil-induced percentage change in [ 18 F]fallypride binding (⌬%BP ND ). Results: The [ 18 F]fallypride binding potentials (BP ND s) were significantly reduced in the ventral striatum, dorsal putamen, and amygdala after remifentanil application in both patients and control subjects. In the patient group, ventral striatum ⌬%BP ND was correlated with the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test score. Conclusions: The data provide evidence for a MOR-mediated interaction between the opioid and the dopamine system, supporting the assumption that one way by which alcohol unfolds its rewarding effects is via a MOR-(␥-aminobutyric acid)-dopamine pathway. No difference in dopamine release was found between patients and control subjects, but evidence for a patient-specific association between sensitivity to MOR stimulation and severity of alcohol dependence was found.
doi:10.1016/j.biopsych.2011.05.035 pmid:21802658 fatcat:kbrrsawkb5eg7jy6jm7fp4opee

Antidopaminergic medication in healthy subjects provokes subjective and objective mental impairments tightly correlated with perturbation of biogenic monoamine metabolism and prolactin secretion

Tanja Veselinovi?, Ingo Vernaleken, Paul Cumming, Uwe Henning, Lina Winkler, Peter Kaleta, Michael Paulzen, Christian Luckhaus, Gerhard Gründer
2018 Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment  
Objectives: Off-label prescription of antipsychotics to patients without psychotic symptoms has become a routine matter for many psychiatrists and also some general practitioners. Nonetheless, little is known about the possibly detrimental effects of antidopaminergic medications on general psychopathology, subjective mental state, or a possible association with physiological parameters in nonpsychotic individuals. Methods: In this randomized, single-blinded study, groups of healthy volunteers
more » ... =18) received low doses of reserpine, aripiprazole, haloperidol, or placebo on 7 successive days. Relevant physiological parameters (plasma prolactin, concentrations of catecholamine metabolites in plasma, and 24-hour urine) and each subject's mental state (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, visual analogue scale, Beck Depression Inventory II) were assessed at the start and end of the trial. Results: Of the three active treatments, only reserpine caused a significant increase in some plasma-and urine-catecholamine metabolites, but all three medications evoked objective and subjective changes in general psychopathology scores, which correlated with individual increases in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations. Both objective and subjective impairments were significantly more pronounced in the subgroup with greatest increase of plasma prolactin. Subjects experiencing the most pronounced side effects under haloperidol, which compelled them to drop out, showed significantly higher prolactin concentration increases than those who tolerated haloperidol well. Conclusion: We found consistent associations between altered markers of dopamine transmission and several objective and subjective mental impairments in healthy volunteers after 1 week's treatment with antidopaminergic medications. These findings should draw attention to a more intensive risk-benefit evaluation in cases of off-label prescription of antipsychotic medications.
doi:10.18154/rwth-conv-237014 fatcat:goteazg5vvbafehcratdzu45x4

Antidopaminergic medication in healthy subjects provokes subjective and objective mental impairments tightly correlated with perturbation of biogenic monoamine metabolism and prolactin secretion

Tanja Veselinovic, Ingo Vernaleken, Paul Cumming, Uwe Henning, Lina Winkler, Peter Kaleta, Michael Paulzen, Christian Luckhaus, Gerhard Gründer
2018 Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment  
Objectives: Off-label prescription of antipsychotics to patients without psychotic symptoms has become a routine matter for many psychiatrists and also some general practitioners. Nonetheless, little is known about the possibly detrimental effects of antidopaminergic medications on general psychopathology, subjective mental state, or a possible association with physiological parameters in nonpsychotic individuals. Methods: In this randomized, single-blinded study, groups of healthy volunteers
more » ... =18) received low doses of reserpine, aripiprazole, haloperidol, or placebo on 7 successive days. Relevant physiological parameters (plasma prolactin, concentrations of catecholamine metabolites in plasma, and 24-hour urine) and each subject's mental state (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, visual analogue scale, Beck Depression Inventory II) were assessed at the start and end of the trial. Results: Of the three active treatments, only reserpine caused a significant increase in some plasma-and urine-catecholamine metabolites, but all three medications evoked objective and subjective changes in general psychopathology scores, which correlated with individual increases in plasma homovanillic acid concentrations. Both objective and subjective impairments were significantly more pronounced in the subgroup with greatest increase of plasma prolactin. Subjects experiencing the most pronounced side effects under haloperidol, which compelled them to drop out, showed significantly higher prolactin concentration increases than those who tolerated haloperidol well. Conclusion: We found consistent associations between altered markers of dopamine transmission and several objective and subjective mental impairments in healthy volunteers after 1 week's treatment with antidopaminergic medications. These findings should draw attention to a more intensive risk-benefit evaluation in cases of off-label prescription of antipsychotic medications.
doi:10.2147/ndt.s148557 pmid:29731635 pmcid:PMC5927059 fatcat:mbcptodxw5csrngwyvfuvu6hwy

Interaction between risperidone, venlafaxine, and metronidazole: An unknown thread

Jana Hovancakova, Gerhard Gründer, Michael Grözinger, Georgios Schoretsanitis, Michael Paulzen
2016
doi:10.7892/boris.91631 fatcat:hxdpmt7xwngsvl3s533lgtefl4

Erratum zu: Therapeutisches Drug-Monitoring in der Neuropsychopharmakologie

Stefan Unterecker, Gudrun Hefner, Pierre Baumann, Gerd Gründer, Niels Bergemann, Hans-Willi Clement, Andreas Conca, Jürgen Deckert, Katharina Domschke, Gabriel Eckermann, Karin Egberts, Manfred Gerlach (+27 others)
2019 Nervenarzt  
doi:10.1007/s00115-019-0766-7 fatcat:p7tealvpfbch7olyuw2pol23tm

Pharmacokinetic considerations in the treatment of hypertension in risperidone-medicated patients

Sarah Eisenhardt, Sarah Lammertz, Benedikt Stegmann, Ekkehard Haen, Michael Paulzen, Georgios Schoretsanitis, Gerhard Gründer, Christoph Hiemke
2016 unpublished
The prevalence of cardiovascular diseases including arterial hypertension in patients with severe mental illnesses such as schizophrenia has been consistently reported to be pronounced compared to the general population [1,2]. Despite the lack of a widely accepted underlying pathophysiological mechanism, the need for effective treatment of these comorbidities remains unmet, often ending up in polypharmacy. Hence, the risk of adverse drugreactions mediated by alterations in cytochrome P450 (CYP)
more » ... enzymes' activity can increase remarkably. Knowledge about drug-drug interactions is essential to enhance tolerability in the treatment of the psychiatric disease as well as in the treatment of the somatic disease. Risperidone (RIS) is a second generation antipsychotic, a cytochrome (CYP) 2D6-catalyzed 9-hydroxylation leads to the major active metabolite, 9hydroxyrisperidone (9-OH-RIS). Increasing in vitro and in vivo findings support an involvement of CYP3A4 and CYP3A5 in the RIS metabolism. Amlodipine is a dihydropyridine calcium channel blocker (CCB), mainly metabolized in the liver, mainly by CYP3A4. Ramipril, on the other hand, belongs to angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and its elimination follows a rapid hepatic hydrolysis producing a major metabolite, ramiprilate. Aim of the study was to analyse the in vivo pharmacokinetic interaction potential between RIS and first-line antihypertensive agents such as amlodipine and ramipril based upon therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) under naturalistic conditions. The present study is a retrospective analysis of data that were collected as part of a cooperation between the
doi:10.7892/boris.91675 fatcat:wxeaa4i3gzgnbj2qpvrgdkiomu

Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions of mood stabilizers and risperidone in patients under Combined treatment

Michael Paulzen, Koen Schruers, Benedikt Stegmann, Georgios Schoretsanitis, Gerhard Gründer, Christoph Hiemke, Ekkehard Haen, Sarah Lammertz
2016
The combination of anticonvulsant mood stabilizers with antipsychotic drugs may lead to clinically relevant drug-drug interactions. The objective of the study was to identify pharmacokinetic interactions of different mood stabilizers on the metabolism of risperidone (RIS) under natural conditions. Methods: A large therapeutic drug monitoring database containing plasma concentrations of RIS and its metabolite 9-hydroxy-RIS (9-OH-RIS) of 1,584 adult patients was analyzed. Four groups (n = 1,072)
more » ... ere compared: a control group without a potentially cytochrome interacting comedication (R 0 , n = 852), a group comedicated with valproate (VPA) (R VPA , n = 153), a group comedicated with lamotrigine (LMT) (R LMT , n = 46), and a group under concomitant medication with carbamazepine (CBZ) (R CBZ , n = 21). Dose-adjusted plasma concentrations (C/D ratio) for RIS, 9-OH-RIS and active moiety (AM) (RIS + 9-OH-RIS), as well as metabolic ratios (RIS/9-OH-RIS) were computed. Results: Groups did not differ with regard to the daily dosage (P = 0.46). Differences were detected for the distributions of the C/D ratios for RIS, 9-OH-RIS and AM (P = 0.003, P < 0.001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Differences remained significant after conducting a Bonferroni correction (P = 0.0125). Pairwise comparisons of the concomitant medication groups with the control group revealed significant differences; RIS C/D ratios were significantly higher in the VPA and the LMT group than in the control group (P = 0.013; P = 0.021). However, these differences did not remain significant after Bonferroni correction. In contrast, CBZ-treated patients showed lower dose-adjusted plasma concentrations of 9-OH-RIS (P < 0.001) as well as the AM (P < 0.001) than the control group; this difference survived the Bonferroni correction. Conclusions: The data give evidence for pharmacokinetic interactions between RIS and different anticonvulsant mood stabilizers. Carbamazepine decreased serum concentrations of 9-OH-RIS and the AM when compared with the control group. In case of VPA and LMT, findings were less significant; hints for a weak RIS metabolism inhibition by LMT of unclear clinical significance were found. Plasma concentration values for 9-OH-RIS and RIS + 9-OH-RIS in the R CBZ group were significantly lower than in the control group (uncorrected P = 0.001 and P = 0.001 for Mann-Whitney U Test). Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology • Volume 36, Number 6, December 2016 Risperidone Combined With Mood Stabilizers FIGURE 2. Median dose-adjusted plasma concentrations (C/D) for risperidone, 9-hydroxyrisperidone and active moiety in the different groups. R LMT = lamotrigine group; R VPA = valproate group; R CBZ = carbamazepine group; R 0 = control group. C/D for RIS, 9-OH-RIS and RIS + 9-OH-RIS in [(ng/ml)/mg].
doi:10.7892/boris.91628 fatcat:5cwlnpdzibhc3cdurjobqakday
« Previous Showing results 1 — 15 out of 28 results