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Ratcheting in Structural Adhesives

Michael Krause, Lloyd Smith
2021 Polymer testing  
A B S T R A C T When adhesively bonded joints are subjected to a cyclic load, they will primarily behave viscoelastically. Under certain loading conditions, they can also experience permanent deformation, or ratcheting. This research considered loading conditions that result in ratcheting for a toughened and standard adhesive in scarf joint coupons. Adhesive strain was measured using edge mounted resistance strain gages that was verified with digital image correlation. At low stress levels both
more » ... adhesives exhibited a purely viscoelastic response. At high stress levels, the standard adhesive exhibited a viscoelastic response in tension-tension and a ratcheting response under reversed loading. At high stress levels the toughened adhesive exhibited ratcheting during tension-tension and reversed loading with higher ratcheting strain in tests that involved reversed loading. Enhanced ratcheting during reversed loading is consistent with a kinematic hardening response, which these adhesives have been shown to follow.
doi:10.1016/j.polymertesting.2021.107154 fatcat:lrlrovk7jzbuxkk4lrdcsvrxfa

Sparse Bounds for Random Discrete Carleson Theorems [article]

Ben Krause, Michael T. Lacey
2016 arXiv   pre-print
We study discrete random variants of the Carleson maximal operator. Intriguingly, these questions remain subtle and difficult, even in this setting. Let {X_m} be an independent sequence of {0,1} random variables with expectations E X_m = σ_m = m^-α, 0 < α < 1/2, and S_m = ∑_k=1 ^m X_k. Then the maximal operator below almost surely is bounded from ℓ ^p to ℓ ^p, provided the Minkowski dimension of Λ⊂ [-1/2, 1/2] is strictly less than 1- α . _λ∈Λ| ∑_m≠ 0 X_ me( λ m )/ sgn (m)S_ |m| f(x- m) |. This
more » ... operator also satisfies a sparse type bound. The form of the sparse bound immediately implies weighted estimates in all ℓ ^2, which are novel in this setting. Variants and extensions are also considered.
arXiv:1609.08701v1 fatcat:tuy63xobtncldm5d2sx4w2joke

Proline-rich Sequence Recognition

Michael Kofler, Michael Schuemann, Christian Merz, Daniela Kosslick, Andreas Schlundt, Astrid Tannert, Michael Schaefer, Reinhard Lührmann, Eberhard Krause, Christian Freund
2009 Molecular & Cellular Proteomics  
1 The abbreviations used are: snRNP, small nuclear ribonuclear particle; PRS, proline-rich sequence(s); PRD, proline-rich sequence recognition domain; CD2BP2, CD2-binding protein 2; SILAC, stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture; FRET, fluorescence resonance energy transfer; CFP, cyan fluorescent protein; YFP, yellow fluorescent protein
doi:10.1074/mcp.m900191-mcp200 pmid:19483244 pmcid:PMC2773714 fatcat:kfgcqnfw4jbzvczl54wnizjfrm

Causal evidence for the adaptive benefits of social foraging in the wild [article]

Lysanne Snijders, Stefan Krause, Alan N Tump, Michael Breuker, Chente Ortiz, Sofia Rizzi, Indar W Ramnarine, Jens Krause, Ralf H J M Kurvers
2020 bioRxiv   pre-print
Sociality is a fundamental organizing principle across taxa, thought to come with a suite of adaptive benefits. However, making causal inferences about these adaptive benefits requires experimental manipulation of the social environment, which is rarely feasible in the field. Here we manipulated the number of conspecifics in Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in the wild, and quantified how this affected a key benefit of sociality, social foraging, by investigating several components of
more » ... oraging success. As adaptive benefits of social foraging may differ between sexes, we studied males and females separately, expecting females, the more social and risk-averse sex, to benefit more from conspecifics than males. Conducting over 1,600 foraging trials, we found that in both sexes, increasing the number of conspecifics led to faster detection of novel food patches and a higher probability of feeding following detection of the patch, resulting in greater individual resource consumption. The slope of the latter relationship differed between the sexes, with males unexpectedly exhibiting a stronger social benefit. Our study provides rare causal evidence for the adaptive benefits of social foraging in the wild, and highlights that sex differences in sociality do not necessarily imply an unequal ability to profit from the presence of others.
doi:10.1101/2020.08.17.254250 fatcat:i66z4ydntnh2zpq5kqpeldhmua

Das RIDGES-Korpus [chapter]

Uwe Springmann, Anke Lüdeling, Carolin Odebrecht, Thomas Krause, Michael Prinz, Jürgen Schiewe
2018 Vernakuläre Wissenschaftskommunikation  
B. möglich, multiple Segmentierungen vorzunehmen (Krause et al. 2012).  ... 
doi:10.1515/9783110476958-020 fatcat:hu2euhuutjgnpc2cfib4nrikq4

Anomaly Detection in Beehives: An Algorithm Comparison [article]

Padraig Davidson, Michael Steininger, Florian Lautenschlager, Anna Krause, Andreas Hotho
2021 arXiv   pre-print
Sensor-equipped beehives allow monitoring the living conditions of bees. Machine learning models can use the data of such hives to learn behavioral patterns and find anomalous events. One type of event that is of particular interest to apiarists for economical reasons is bee swarming. Other events of interest are behavioral anomalies from illness and technical anomalies, e.g. sensor failure. Beekeepers can be supported by suitable machine learning models which can detect these events. In this
more » ... per we compare multiple machine learning models for anomaly detection and evaluate them for their applicability in the context of beehives. Namely we employed Deep Recurrent Autoencoder, Elliptic Envelope, Isolation Forest, Local Outlier Factor and One-Class SVM. Through evaluation with real world datasets of different hives and with different sensor setups we find that the autoencoder is the best multi-purpose anomaly detector in comparison.
arXiv:2110.03945v1 fatcat:zhpjpxnsgzdkvjc6pwaq5i6uai

A Context Middleware Using an Ontology-Based Information Model [chapter]

Iris Hochstatter, Michael Duergner, Michael Krause
2007 Lecture Notes in Computer Science  
For the adaptation of services to the current situation of a user, the services are in need of specific context information. The acquisition of context in highly dynamic environments is a complex process as the appropriate context sources are not known in advance. Moreover, to realize Mark Weiser's vision of ubiquitous computing, many services on the one hand and a good deal of context information on the other hand have to be combined. Hence, we follow a middleware approach to automate context
more » ... etrieval for services. For the exchange over domain boundaries, services in need of and services offering context information have to agree on a common description of the information. Therefore, a flexible and extensible information model is a basic requirement. This paper describes in detail the integration of those two important foundations of context-aware computing.
doi:10.1007/978-3-540-73530-4_3 fatcat:o2byseydsfew5elvoau6xpfxo4

Causal evidence for the adaptive benefits of social foraging in the wild

Lysanne Snijders, Stefan Krause, Alan N. Tump, Michael Breuker, Chente Ortiz, Sofia Rizzi, Indar W. Ramnarine, Jens Krause, Ralf H.J.M. Kurvers
2021 Communications Biology  
AbstractSociality is a fundamental organizing principle across taxa, thought to come with a suite of adaptive benefits. However, making causal inferences about these adaptive benefits requires experimental manipulation of the social environment, which is rarely feasible in the field. Here we manipulated the number of conspecifics in Trinidadian guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in the wild, and quantified how this affected a key benefit of sociality, social foraging, by investigating several
more » ... nts of foraging success. As adaptive benefits of social foraging may differ between sexes, we studied males and females separately, expecting females, the more social and risk-averse sex in guppies, to benefit more from conspecifics. Conducting over 1600 foraging trials, we found that in both sexes, increasing the number of conspecifics led to faster detection of novel food patches and a higher probability of feeding following detection of the patch, resulting in greater individual resource consumption. The extent of the latter relationship differed between the sexes, with males unexpectedly exhibiting a stronger social benefit. Our study provides rare causal evidence for the adaptive benefits of social foraging in the wild, and highlights that sex differences in sociality do not necessarily imply an unequal ability to profit from the presence of others.
doi:10.1038/s42003-020-01597-7 pmid:33473153 fatcat:hcmqpl6i5bbvzbzwba367oar4m

Appraisal and Acquisition Strategies. Edited by Michael J. Shallcross and Christopher J. Prom. [Review]

Rose Sliger Krause
2017 Archival Issues  
Sliger Krause Metadata Librarian Eastern Washington University notes 1. 2. Reviews  ... 
doi:10.31274/archivalissues.11038 fatcat:g3zv4dexwjfwdf5sqobvo77a4e

Tris(1-propan-2-onyl oxime)amine

Michael J. Goldcamp, Jeanette A. Krause Bauer, Michael J. Baldwin
2002 Acta Crystallographica Section E  
For the past couple of years, our research effort has focused on the reactivity of Ni, Cu and Zn complexes (Goldcamp, Robison, Krause Bauer & Baldwin, 2002; Goldcamp, Robison, Squires et al., 2002) of  ... 
doi:10.1107/s1600536802020135 fatcat:ngmx6lycjzgb5opq7f4df64v3e

The Expectations-driven US Current Account

Mathias Hoffmann, Michael U. Krause, Thomas Laubach
2017 Economic Journal  
Since 1991, the U.S. current account has moved from almost balanced to a large de...cit of six percent of GDP in 2005, and has fallen by half afterwards. This pattern is closely related to the evolution of survey expectations of long-run output growth for the U.S. relative to the rest of the world. Such a relationship should come as no surprise from the perspective of the intertemporal approach to the current account, which explains external imbalances as result-ing from the
more » ... g motive of households. By contrast, policy discussions instead mainly focused on the possibility that current ac-count balances represent undesirable "global imbalances", driven by factors such as gov-ernment manipulation of the exchange rate, ...nancial repression in emerging economies, or overly stimulative policies and distortions in de...cit countries. Seeing a close link between im-balances and the crisis, commentators even recommend limiting current account balances to a certain magnitude, and aim to ...nd appropriate measures from historical experience. One of the insights provided by the intertemporal approach is that expected growth trends should be of ...rst-order importance when it comes to ...nding the level to which current ac-count balances should converge. In this paper, we assess the ability of the intertemporal ap-proach to the current account to quantitatively explain the global imbalances of the last two decades. We set up and simulate a two-region growth model that allows for changing productivity trend growth rates. In contrast to the perfect information assumption maintained in standard rational expectations models, we assume that observed productivity growth is only a noisy signal of the small but persistent trend component that determines long-run income expectations. Therefore, we ...lter actual productivity data for the U.S. and for a proxy for the rest of the world to extract an estimate of the long-run trend growth rate. To generate a cur-rent account implied by the model, we feed the resulting series for the two perceived persis-tent growth rates along with actual productivity into the calibrated model's equilibrium condi-tions. The historical simulation of the model suggests that indeed a substantial part of U.S. current account dynamics from 1991 to 2010 can be explained by changes in trend growth ex-pectations for the U.S. relative to those for the rest of the world. This is because the substan-tial widening of the current account de...cit in the late 1990s coincides with improving per-ceived U.S. productivity growth prospects, while those for the rest of the world worsened after the Asian ...nancial crisis. Likewise, when trend U.S. productivity growth slowed down since 2005, and growth in China and the rest of the world stayed high, global imbalances in the model and the data narrow until 2010. Our ...ndings indicate that current account imbalances could be seen as an e¢ cient re-sponse to changing perceptions of relative long-run growth prospects in the global economy, while other authors have interpreted them as a response to evolving cross-country di¤er-ences in ...nancial development, the relative quality and depth of U.S. ...nancial markets or by ine¢ cient, policy-induced distortions. A historical shock decomposition suggests, however, that such alternative factors are likely to be of relatively lesser importance for the understand-ing of U.S. current account dynamics than movements in growth expectations. Thus, our analysis places greater emphasis on the ex ante e¢ cient responses to perceived changes in trend productivity growth rather than ine¢ cient policies. That said, for as long as agents need to take decisions under imperfect knowledge of trend growth rates at home and abroad, it is always possible that current account movements will at times appear to have been excessive, with all the concomitant painful adjustment this entails. Abstract Since 1991, survey expectations of long-run output growth for the U.S. relative to the rest of the world exhibit a pattern strikingly similar to that of the U.S. current account, and thus also to global imbalances. We show that this ...nding can to a large extent be rationalized in a two-region stochastic growth model simulated using expected trend growth ...ltered from observed productivity. In line with the intertemporal approach to the current account, a major part of the buildup of the U.S. current account de...cit appears to be driven by the optimal response of households and ...rms to improved growth prospects.
doi:10.1111/ecoj.12539 fatcat:suhuwqlobrfllcccdp7rr5xftm

Deep Learning for Climate Model Output Statistics [article]

Michael Steininger, Daniel Abel, Katrin Ziegler, Anna Krause, Heiko Paeth, Andreas Hotho
2020 arXiv   pre-print
Climate models are an important tool for the assessment of prospective climate change effects but they suffer from systematic and representation errors, especially for precipitation. Model output statistics (MOS) reduce these errors by fitting the model output to observational data with machine learning. In this work, we explore the feasibility and potential of deep learning with convolutional neural networks (CNNs) for MOS. We propose the CNN architecture ConvMOS specifically designed for
more » ... ing errors in climate model outputs and apply it to the climate model REMO. Our results show a considerable reduction of errors and mostly improved performance compared to three commonly used MOS approaches.
arXiv:2012.10394v1 fatcat:jlfhs5bmkrexjmnfkpq3no7zra

How facts travel: The model systems of sociology

Michael Guggenheim, Monika Krause
2012 Poetics  
Please cite this article in press as: Krause M., Guggenheim, M., How facts travel: The model systems of sociology.  ...  this article in press as: Krause M., Guggenheim, M., How facts travel: The model systems of sociology.  ...  this article in press as: Krause M., Guggenheim, M., How facts travel: The model systems of sociology. Poetics (2012), doi:10.1016/j.poetic.2012.  ... 
doi:10.1016/j.poetic.2012.02.007 fatcat:7o5y7iv4mffvdm5y5lr6dpzhha

Tris[2-(benzoylamino)ethyl]amine

Michael J. Goldcamp, Jeanette A. Krause Bauer, Michael J. Baldwin
2000 Acta Crystallographica Section C: Crystal Structure Communications  
C56, e602-e603 [doi:10.1107/S0108270100017017] Tris[2-(benzoylamino)ethyl]amine Michael J. Goldcamp, Jeanette A. Krause Bauer and Michael J. Baldwin Computing details Data collection: P3-P4/PC  ... 
doi:10.1107/s0108270100017017 fatcat:wt47qlepsfg4la2tlmxlbv34qi

Is the PANSS used correctly? a systematic review

Michael Obermeier, Rebecca Schennach-Wolff, Sebastian Meyer, Hans-Jürgen Möller, Michael Riedel, Daniela Krause, Florian Seemüller
2011 BMC Psychiatry  
The PANSS (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale) is one of the most important rating instruments for patients with schizophrenia. Nevertheless, there is a long and ongoing debate in the psychiatric community regarding its mathematical properties. All 30 items range from 1 to 7 leading to a minimum total score of 30, implying that the PANSS is an interval scale. For such interval scales straightforward calculation of relative changes is not appropriate. To calculate outcome criteria based on a
more » ... rcent change as, e.g., the widely accepted response criterion, the scale has to be transformed into a ratio scale beforehand. Recent publications have already pointed out the pitfall that ignoring the scale level (interval vs. ratio scale) leads to a set of mathematical problems, potentially resulting in erroneous results concerning the efficacy of the treatment. Methods: A Pubmed search based on the PRISMA statement of the highest-ranked psychiatric journals (search terms "PANSS" and "response") was carried out. All articles containing percent changes were included and methods of percent change calculation were analysed. Results: This systematic literature research shows that the majority of authors (62%) actually appear to use incorrect calculations. In most instances the method of calculation was not described in the manuscript. Conclusions: These alarming results underline the need for standardized procedures for PANSS calculations.
doi:10.1186/1471-244x-11-113 pmid:21767349 pmcid:PMC3146924 fatcat:r2zlxsgezzffrp27c3ms5p3y2q
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