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ATM-mediated KDM2A phosphorylation is required for the DNA damage repair

L-L Cao, F Wei, Y Du, B Song, D Wang, C Shen, X Lu, Z Cao, Q Yang, Y Gao, L Wang, Y Zhao (+3 others)
2015 Oncogene  
The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is a key signaling molecule that modulates the DNA damage response. However, the exact mechanism by which ATM regulates DNA damage repair has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that ATM regulates the DNA damage response by phosphorylating lysine-specific demethylase 2A (KDM2A), a histone demethylase that acts at sites of H3K36 dimethylation. ATM interacts with KDM2A, and their interaction significantly increases in response to DNA
more » ... nded, but not single-stranded, breaks. ATM specifically phosphorylates KDM2A at threonine 632 (T632) following DNA damage, as demonstrated by a mutagenesis assay and mass spectrometric analysis. Although KDM2A phosphorylation does not alter its own demethylase activity, T632 phosphorylation of KDM2A largely abrogates its chromatin-binding capacity, and H3K36 dimethylation near DNA damage sites is significantly increased. Consequently, enriched H3K36 dimethylation serves as a platform to recruit the MRE11 complex to DNA damage sites by directly interacting with the BRCT2 domain of NBS1, which results in efficient DNA damage repair and enhanced cell survival. Collectively, our study reveals a novel mechanism for ATM in connecting histone modifications with the DNA damage response.
doi:10.1038/onc.2015.81 pmid:25823024 fatcat:y7p5wlewtvflrby5wy4gab7yam

Erratum: ATM-mediated KDM2A phosphorylation is required for the DNA damage repair

L-L Cao, F Wei, Y Du, B Song, D Wang, C Shen, X Lu, Z Cao, Q Yang, Y Gao, L Wang, Y Zhao (+3 others)
2016 Oncogene  
The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein is a key signaling molecule that modulates the DNA damage response. However, the exact mechanism by which ATM regulates DNA damage repair has not yet been elucidated. Here, we report that ATM regulates the DNA damage response by phosphorylating lysine-specific demethylase 2A (KDM2A), a histone demethylase that acts at sites of H3K36 dimethylation. ATM interacts with KDM2A, and their interaction significantly increases in response to DNA
more » ... nded, but not single-stranded, breaks. ATM specifically phosphorylates KDM2A at threonine 632 (T632) following DNA damage, as demonstrated by a mutagenesis assay and mass spectrometric analysis. Although KDM2A phosphorylation does not alter its own demethylase activity, T632 phosphorylation of KDM2A largely abrogates its chromatin-binding capacity, and H3K36 dimethylation near DNA damage sites is significantly increased. Consequently, enriched H3K36 dimethylation serves as a platform to recruit the MRE11 complex to DNA damage sites by directly interacting with the BRCT2 domain of NBS1, which results in efficient DNA damage repair and enhanced cell survival. Collectively, our study reveals a novel mechanism for ATM in connecting histone modifications with the DNA damage response.
doi:10.1038/onc.2015.311 pmid:26790816 fatcat:jdo5n6byuzadrjncf3u4p7m2g4

The alternative oxidase of Candida albicans causes reduced fluconazole susceptibility

L. Yan, M. Li, Y. Cao, P. Gao, Y. Cao, Y. Wang, Y. Jiang
2009 Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy  
, 8 mg/L) and miconazole (MCZ, 16 mg/L).  ...  itraconazole, 4 mg/L; ketoconazole, 8 mg/L; miconazole, 16 mg/L). 34 To determine drug susceptibility in the presence of respiratory inhibitors, plates were supplemented with 1 mM KCN or 5 mM SHAM.  ... 
doi:10.1093/jac/dkp273 pmid:19656781 fatcat:lzjdiid3vrg7zopib2uzdyv2mq

RTA2 is involved in calcineurin-mediated azole resistance and sphingoid long-chain base release in Candida albicans

X. M. Jia, Y. Wang, Y. Jia, P. H. Gao, Y. G. Xu, L. Wang, Y. Y. Cao, Y. B. Cao, L. X. Zhang, Y. Y. Jiang
2008 Cellular and Molecular Life Sciences (CMLS)  
The addition of 1 mmol/l CaCl 2 did not attenuate the destroying effects of FLC (Fig. 4H, L) .  ...  mmol/l at 30 min (Fig. 7B, squares) .  ... 
doi:10.1007/s00018-008-8409-3 pmid:19002381 fatcat:j4pnya3rb5betgjiveyjtr4wei

Neil Smith, Observatorio Metropolitano, Raquel Rolnik, Andrew Ross y Mike Davis. Después del neoliberalismo: ciudades y caos sistémico

Felipe Link L
2011 Revista de Geografía  
Felipe Link L. 1 El libro Después del neoliberalismo: ciudades y caos sistémico, es el resultado de un seminario realizado en noviembre de 2008, en el Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Barcelona, cuyo objetivo  ...  Mike daVis. desPués del neoliBeralisMo: Ciudades y Caos sistéMiCo territorio.  ... 
doi:10.4067/s0718-34022011000300012 fatcat:khhlzycvcvfsppqqoxfrgnpnoy

Elevated PLGF contributes to small-cell lung cancer brain metastasis

B Li, C Wang, Y Zhang, X Y Zhao, B Huang, P F Wu, Q Li, H Li, Y S Liu, L Y Cao, W M Dai, W G Fang (+4 others)
2012 Oncogene  
Fluorescence in situ hybridization Sections from paraffin-embedded tissues were prepared and in situ hybridization was performed using labeled Y-chromosome probe, CEP Y (DYZ1) SpectrumGreen Probe and Paraffin  ...  Fluorescence in situ hybridization assay using Y-chromosome-specific probe was performed and the results showed that the positive signal was solely observed in the area of brain metastatic lesions (Supplementary  ... 
doi:10.1038/onc.2012.313 pmid:22797069 fatcat:uurzywbbtvevjgarcx27gfrd7a

Spermidine alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis through inducing inhibitory macrophages

Q Yang, C Zheng, J Cao, G Cao, P Shou, L Lin, T Velletri, M Jiang, Q Chen, Y Han, F Li, Y Wang (+2 others)
2016 Cell Death and Differentiation  
To examine this hypothesis, N w -hydroxy-nor-L-arginine (nor-NOHA) was employed to block arginase-1 activity.  ...  More importantly, spermidine upregulates expression of arginase 1 in macrophages, which consume the microenvironmental L-arginine required for T cells.  ... 
doi:10.1038/cdd.2016.71 pmid:27447115 pmcid:PMC5071574 fatcat:fhvedo3bgzgqbn5q63e37dp4tu

Dissecting Genetic Architecture Underlying Seed Traits in Multiple Environments

T. Qi, Y. Cao, L. Cao, Y. Gao, S. Zhu, X. Lou, H. Xu
2014 Genetics  
) additive-additive epistatic effect between Q k and Q l ; with coefficient x Am ik x Ae il ; aa em kl is the endosperm (embryo)-maternal additive-additive epistatic effect between Q k and Q l ; with coefficient  ...  For the ith strain in the jth block from the hth environment, its phenotype of seed trait y hij can be expressed by the following mixed linear model: y hij ¼ m þ X s k ða m k x Am ik þ d m k x Dm ik þ  ... 
doi:10.1534/genetics.114.168203 pmid:25335503 pmcid:PMC4286693 fatcat:yptopdddqngrrgm2sqozebjc7a

Tumour cell-derived exosomes endow mesenchymal stromal cells with tumour-promotion capabilities

L Y Lin, L M Du, K Cao, Y Huang, P F Yu, L Y Zhang, F Y Li, Y Wang, Y F Shi
2016 Oncogene  
Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are a major component of the tumour microenvironment. A plethora of elegant studies focusing on tumour-derived MSCs have shown that they, unlike normal MSCs in other tissue, exhibit a strong ability to promote tumour progression. However, the mechanisms underlying the conversion of normal MSCs into tumour-associated MSCs are unknown. We report here a critical role of tumour cell-derived exosomes in endowing bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) with a
more » ... le phenotype. Tumour cell-derived exosomes affected neither the growth factor production nor the immunosuppressive property of MSCs; rather, they endowed MSCs with a strong ability to promote macrophage infiltration into B16-F0 melanoma or EL-4 lymphoma. Ablation of macrophages by clodronate liposome administration reversed the tumour-promoting effect of MSCs educated by tumour cell-derived exosomes (TE-MSCs) on the tumour growth. By comparing the chemokine profile of BM-MSCs with that of TE-MSCs, we found that TE-MSCs produced a large amount of CCR2 ligands, CCL2 and CCL7, which are responsible for macrophage recruitment. CCR2-specific inhibitor was found to block the tumour-promoting effect of TE-MSCs. Thus, our investigations demonstrated that tumour cell-derived exosomes confer BM-MSCs the ability to enhance tumour growth. Therefore, we uncovered a novel mechanism underlying the conversion of normal MSCs to tumour-associated MSCs.
doi:10.1038/onc.2016.131 pmid:27132512 pmcid:PMC5116561 fatcat:2u7qbefddffylfnbyodyjmh6ye

Klf4 is required for germ-layer differentiation and body axis patterning during Xenopus embryogenesis

Q. Cao, X. Zhang, L. Lu, L. Yang, J. Gao, Y. Gao, H. Ma, Y. Cao
2012 Development  
Wu, Y. L. Chen, M. Taira and D. Melton for gifts of plasmids.  ...  Xenopus Oct4 homologous factors Oct60, Oct25 and Oct91 inhibit mesendoderm germ-layer formation via inhibition of the activities of VegT, -catenin and Nodal (Cao et al., 2006; Cao et al., 2007; Cao et  ...  (L)Quantification of embryos with normal or altered Mix2 expression observed in K. Error bars represent s.d. in triplicate.  ... 
doi:10.1242/dev.082024 pmid:22992953 fatcat:46lt7krm4zcwhhvkpa7d6bstse

Aplicaciones en Argentina [chapter]

J. Ruiz, L. Aldeco, A. Diehl, Y. García Skabar, C. Matsudo, M. Osman, L. Pelorosso, C. Saulo, C. Vera
2018 Física del caos en la predicción meteorológica  
En ella se localiza la Cuenca del Plata, la segunda en importancia en el continente y la quinta en el mundo, y tres subcuencas: Paraná, Paraguay y Uruguay.  ...  Figura 37.12: Para el pronóstico probabilista de temperatura superficial de DEF sobre Sudamérica a),b) y c) Diagramas de atributos y frecuencia de distribución relativa; y d), e) y f) diagramas ROC.  ... 
doi:10.31978/014-18-009-x.37 fatcat:xzuy5jndhrfg5dvnrpwrqdxzhq

Realizing coherently convertible dual-type qubits with the same ion species [article]

H.-X. Yang, J.-Y. Ma, Y.-K. Wu, Y. Wang, M.-M. Cao, W.-X. Guo, Y.-Y. Huang, L. Feng, Z.-C. Zhou, L.-M. Duan
2021 arXiv   pre-print
Y.-K. W. acknowledges support from Shuimu Tsinghua Scholar Program and International Postdoctoral Exchange Fellowship Program (Talent-Introduction Program).  ...  To measure the crosstalk between two ions, we use trap frequencies ω x = 2π × 3.15 MHz, ω y = 2π × 2.97 MHz and ω z = 2π × 120 kHz such that the ion separation is about 14 µm.  ... 
arXiv:2106.14906v1 fatcat:gtwjcbvnifajfnai6djy55bbbm

AAIR: Antibody Antigen Information Resource

Z. Tang, L. Han, B. Xie, C. Y. Ung, L. Jiang, Z. Cao, Y. Chen
2007 Journal of Immunology  
Zhiqun Tang,* Lianyi Han,* Bin Xie,* Choong Yong Ung,* Li Jiang,* Zhiwei Cao, † and Yuzong Chen* † *Bioinformatics and Drug Design Group Department of Pharmacy and Department of Computational Science National  ... 
doi:10.4049/jimmunol.178.8.4705 pmid:17404245 fatcat:mv6o24slurcsngjvzwot2kxo5m

High-efficiency visible photoluminescence from amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in silicon nitride

Y. Q. Wang, Y. G. Wang, L. Cao, Z. X. Cao
2003 Applied Physics Letters  
Confinement of silicon nanoparticles in silicon nitride instead of an oxide matrix might materially facilitate its potential applications as a light-emitting component in optoelectronics. We report in this letter the production of high-density ͑up to 4.0ϫ10 12 /cm 2 from micrographs͒ silicon nanoparticles in SiN x thin films by chemical vapor deposition on cold substrates. Strong room-temperature photoluminescence was observed in the whole visible light range from the deposits that were
more » ... aled at 500°C for 2 min. The Si-in-SiN x films provide a significantly more effective photoluminescence than Si-in-SiO x fabricated with similar processing parameters: for blue light, the external quantum efficiency is over three times as large. The present results demonstrate that the nanostructured Si-in-SiN x system can be a very competitive candidate for the development of tunable high-efficiency light-emitting devices. For a long time silicon has been considered unsuitable for optoelectronic applications: bulk silicon emits hardly any useful light because of the indirect nature of its band gap. A variety of different approaches has been conceived for silicon based light-emitting structures; among these, the quantum confinement of carriers in nanostructured silicon systems has come to dominate current research. In particular, efficient room-temperature photoluminescence ͑PL͒ has been realized in nanocrystalline Si-in-SiO 2 systems, which have the structural stability that is crucial for reliable fabrication of solid light emitters. 1 However, several problems remain to be resolved for this kind of silicon light-emitting devices ͑LEDs͒. One is the very high processing temperature. Generally, post annealing at temperatures over 1100°C is necessary for the formation and crystallization of silicon nanoparticles in SiO x for a PL efficiency on the order of a few percent. 1,2 Such an annealing temperature is prohibitively high when integrating the LEDs with electronic components. The second problem concerns the carrier injection for electroluminescence. Carrier injection is accomplished by the tunneling mechanism. For silicon nanocrystals embedded in the SiO 2 matrix, which has a band gap of about 8.5 eV, the operating voltage of such LEDs would be unacceptably high. 3 Clearly, silicon nanoparticles with strong light emission, prepared at low temperature in a matrix with a smaller band gap would be quite valuable. Very recently, we have succeeded in preparing highdensity amorphous silicon nanoparticles in a SiO x matrix by chemical vapor deposition ͑CVD͒ directly on cold substrates. The deposits, after annealing at 500°C for 2 min, exhibited PL through red to blue-green with efficiencies over 1.0%. 4 If light-emitting silicon particles can also be prepared in silicon nitride by such a cold procedure, the significantly narrower band gap of nitride ͑5.3 eV͒ 5 might alleviate the carrier injection problem for Si electroluminescence. Of course, one prerequisite for any further work toward this end is to obtain high-efficiency PL from the Si-in-SiN x system-a reasonable objective. Replacing the oxide matrix with nitride also helps clarify the possible mechanisms underlying light emission of silicon nanostructures. For Si-in-SiO x , which has been extensively exploited for over a decade, a fair bit of controversy remains around the details of the PL process. One group of researchers attributed all the relevant phenomena solely to the quantum confinement effect. 6 Others claimed that the interface states induced by structural and/or compositional disorders play a rather critical role in determining the PL behavior. 7,8 By comparing the PL from silicon nanoparticles in distinct matrices, some insight into the role of the silicon-matrix interface can be obtained. Few studies have focused on the structure and PL properties of Si-in-SiN x thin films. In the present work we will show that high-density silicon nanoparticles can be produced in SiN x thin films by the CVD technique on cold substrates. PL in the whole visible light range can be achieved in samples that were postannealed at 500°C, and the PL efficiency is remarkably higher than that achieved in Si-in-SiO x prepared with similar processing parameters, especially in the short wavelength section. Si-in-SiN x films of about 1.2 m thick were prepared on Si ͑100͒ wafers and quartz in a capacitance-coupled plasmaenhanced CVD setup using the gas mixture of SiH 4 , N 2 , and H 2 as the precursor. The total flow rate was fixed at 60 sccm, while the nitrogen-to-silane flow rate ratio ␥ was adjusted between 1.0 and 5.5. The rf power was 35 W and the working pressure was maintained at 1.5ϫ10 2 Pa. No designed substrate heating was applied; the substrate temperature remained below 60°C at the end of deposition. The Si-in-SiO x films for comparative study were fabricated by replacing N 2 with N 2 O under the same conditions. Postannealing at various temperatures up to 900°C for 2 min was performed in a N 2 /Ar atmosphere. The local bonding configurations in the films were characterized by infrared absorption measurement on a Perkin-Elmer 2000 Fourier-transform infrared ͑FTIR͒ a͒ Electronic mail: zxcao@aphy.iphy.ac.cn APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS VOLUME 83, NUMBER 17
doi:10.1063/1.1621462 fatcat:zcd5viekhbfmhmkghczvufqizq

Complete Genome Sequence of Dengue Virus Serotype 3 from Guangzhou, China

Z. Bai, L.-C. Liu, L.-Y. Jiang, Q. Liu, Y.-M. Cao, Y. Xu, Q.-L. Jing, L. Luo, Z.-C. Yang, Y.-Q. Jiang, W. Chen, B. Di
2013 Genome Announcements  
In 2009, dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV-3) was first detected in Guangzhou, China. In this study, we identified another isolated strain belonging to genotype II. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the GZ/10476/2012 strain has a close relationship with the DENV-3 genotype II from Southeast Asian strains.
doi:10.1128/genomea.00208-12 pmid:23516231 pmcid:PMC3593333 fatcat:22tsi3jq6jfm7mvzrhn62hscpa
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