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Postscript: COVID-19 and SDG progress

Stephanie A. Macht, Ross L. Chapman, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald
2020 Journal of Management & Organization  
doi:10.1017/jmo.2020.42 fatcat:eln55odkhresljx3ab4uzeqoci

Management research and the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals

Stephanie A. Macht, Ross L. Chapman, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald
2020 Journal of Management & Organization  
Fitzgerald and Frank Gertsen, the authors argue that researchers have a civic duty to ensure that their work has valuable impact for the 'real world'.  ...  measuring real-world research impact: Using sustainable development goals (SDGs) and targets in academia', authored by Geoffrey Chapman, Ashley Cully, Jennifer Kosiol, Stephanie Macht, Ross Chapman, Anneke  ... 
doi:10.1017/jmo.2020.36 fatcat:imsy4yedfzbchlx7ktw3nf7gaq

Using Visual Analytics to Improve Hospital Scheduling and Patient Flow

Janna Anneke Fitzgerald, Ann Dadich
2009 Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research  
The increasing demand for hospital emergency services has important implications for the allocation of limited public resources and the management of healthcare services. Although reform is an oft-cited way to improve the healthcare system, it has a limited ability to readily address this increasing demand. This paper presents an innovative approach to identify and translate feasible solutions to improve the efficiency of hospitals. Premised on visual analytics, the paper describes the way a
more » ... tware program was used to represent sonography department processes within a virtual environment. The processes were represented by collecting and assembling information about room capacity, room use, patient-scheduling practices, staff capacity, and equipment availability. The resulting model helped to identify areas for improvement and simulate viable options to improve these areas. This was associated with two clear benefits -it allowed solutions to be considered without making changes to the physical environment, and it provided a way to clearly demonstrate to staff the relationship between process change and improved efficiency. The paper concludes with directions for future research.
doi:10.4067/s0718-18762009000200003 fatcat:mvr3gks5sje3nckmtw2br6ab5y

Organisational change: communicating to Schein's operator, engineer and executive occupational subcultures

Geoffrey R. Chapman, Kathryn J. Hayes, Terry Sloan, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald
2011 International Journal of Learning and Change  
System® improves understandings of self and team-mates, facilitates positive personal development, and increases team effectiveness (Fitzgerald et al., 2005 , Fitzgerald, Dadich, Chapman, & Fitzgerald  ...  Since then, the reliable and validated 40-item questionnaire (Fitzgerald, Ferres, Hamilton, & Fitzgerald, 2005) , and individual profile report that comprise the I.D.  ... 
doi:10.1504/ijlc.2011.045071 fatcat:sfv7lw52ivg7xnrsdh2ju7zll4

Health services innovation: evaluating process changes to improve patient flow

Janna Anneke Fitzgerald, Kathy Eljiz, Ann Dadich, Terry Sloan, Kathryn J. Hayes
2011 International Journal of Healthcare Technology and Management  
Fitzgerald, Dadich, & Lum, 2007; J. Fitzgerald, Lum, & Dadich, 2006; J. A. Fitzgerald, Lum, & Dadich, 2008) .  ...  The capacity of the EDs is one of the most pressing concerns for both policymakers and health department managers (NHHRCA, 2009; Fitzgerald, Sloan, Simoff, Samaranayake, & Johnston, 2008) .  ... 
doi:10.1504/ijhtm.2011.040479 fatcat:nhv25f5hzrcchopwljguiffbnq

Uniting generations: A research protocol examining the impacts of an intergenerational learning program on participants and organisations

Xanthe Golenko, Katrina Radford, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald, Nerina Vecchio, Jennifer Cartmel, Neil Harris
2020 Australasian Journal on Ageing  
ORCID Xanthe Golenko https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7911-3822 Katrina Radford https://orcid.org/0000-0003-2095-0647 Janna Anneke Fitzgerald https://orcid. org/0000-0002-4768-9680  ... 
doi:10.1111/ajag.12761 pmid:31919942 fatcat:lmxsdvmiv5faxhign22bhibwl4

Intergenerational Practice in the Community—What Does the Community Think?

Gail Kenning, Nicole Ee, Ying Xu, Billy L. Luu, Stephanie A. Ward, Micah B. Goldwater, Ebony Lewis, Katrina Radford, Kaarin J. Anstey, Nicola T. Lautenschlager, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald, Kenneth Rockwood (+1 others)
2021 Social Sciences  
The many changes that occur in the lives of older people put them at an increased risk of being socially isolated and lonely. Intergenerational programs for older adults and young children can potentially address this shortfall, because of the perceived benefit from generations interacting. This study explores whether there is an appetite in the community for intergenerational programs for community dwelling older adults. An online survey was distributed via social media, research team
more » ... and snowballing recruitment with access provided via QR code or hyperlink. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with potential participants of a pilot intergenerational program planned for the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney, Australia in 2020. The interviews were thematically analyzed. Over 250 people completed the survey, and 21 interviews took place with older adults (10) and parents of young children (11). The data showed that participants were all in favor of intergenerational programs, but there were different perceptions about who benefits most and how. The study highlighted considerations to be addressed in the development of effective and sustainable intergenerational programs. For example, accessing people in the community who are most socially isolated and lonely was identified as a primary challenge. More evidence-based research is needed to support involvement of different cohorts, such as those who are frail, or living with physical or cognitive limitations.
doi:10.3390/socsci10100374 fatcat:e75hfcjuzvgglc7zrvnqp55ure

Elaborated integration of qualitative and quantitative perspectives in mixed methods research: A profound enquiry into the nursing practice environment

Nazlee Siddiqui, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald
2014 International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches  
Australian context, the chosen instruments were taken through an adaptation process, comprising of steps such as peer review, pilot study and statistical test of validity and reliability (Siddiqui & Fitzgerald  ... 
doi:10.1080/18340806.2014.11082056 fatcat:j3pclchnw5do5jkx3tawl3devq

Agents of change: establishing quality improvement collaboratives to improve adherence to Australian clinical guidelines for dementia care

Monica Cations, Maria Crotty, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald, Susan Kurrle, Ian D Cameron, Craig Whitehead, Jane Thompson, Billingsley Kaambwa, Kate Hayes, Lenore de la Perrelle, Gorjana Radisic, Kate E Laver
2018 Implementation Science  
Dissemination of clinical practice guidelines alone is insufficient to create meaningful change in clinical practice. Quality improvement collaborative models have potential to address the evidence-practice gap in dementia care because they capitalise on known knowledge translation enablers and incorporate optimal approaches to implementation. Non-pharmacological interventions focused on promoting independence are effective and favoured by people with dementia and their carers but are not
more » ... ely implemented. The objective of this translational project is to assess the impact of quality improvement collaboratives (QICs) on adherence to non-pharmacological recommendations from the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Dementia in Australia. This project will employ an interrupted time-series design with process evaluation to assess the impact, uptake, feasibility, accessibility, cost, and sustainability of the QICs over 18 months. Thirty clinicians from across Australia will be invited to join the QICs to build their capacity in leading innovation in dementia care. Clinicians will participate in a training program and be supported to develop and implement a quality improvement project unique to their service context using plan-do-study-act cycles. Regular online meetings with their peers in the QIC will facilitate benchmarking and problem-solving. Clinicians will describe their practice via monthly checklists, and guideline adherence will be determined against a set of defined criteria. Phone interviews with up to 180 client dyads will be used to assess satisfaction with care and client outcomes. Clinician interviews and field note data will be used to explore implementation and costs. Involvement of people with dementia and carers will be embedded in the study design, conduct, and reporting, in addition to clinical and industry expertise. The quality of dementia care in Australia is largely dependent on the clinician involved and the extent to which they apply best available evidence in their practice. This study will determine the elements of this multifaceted implementation strategy that contributed to guideline adherence and client outcomes. The findings will inform future translational approaches to improving care and outcomes for people with dementia and their carers. Registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry 21 February 2018 ( ACTRN12618000268246 ).
doi:10.1186/s13012-018-0820-z pmid:30249276 pmcid:PMC6154830 fatcat:hleax4denzhrfiuhovgvcyo45q

Putting the consumer in the driver's seat: A visual journey through the Australian health‐care system as experienced by people living with dementia and their carers

Janna Anneke Fitzgerald, Joanne Curry, Angelique Olde Meierink, Ashley Cully
2019 Australasian Journal on Ageing  
ORCID Janna Anneke Fitzgerald https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4768-9680 Ashley Cully https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6600-4341  ...  One carer stated: I [ | 49 FITZGERALD ET AL. | Suggestions from participants An option supported by all focus groups was to "centralise access to dementia information and services."  ...  Open dialogue between people living with dementia and their carers, | 47 FITZGERALD ET AL. policymakers and health-care providers is needed to identify the problem areas that require care path redesign  ... 
doi:10.1111/ajag.12691 pmid:31496060 fatcat:rzpj7zwh6ra43plcqv44xrzfga

Improving adherence to guideline recommendations in dementia care through establishing a quality improvement collaborative of agents of change: an interrupted time series study

Kate Laver, Monica Cations, Gorjana Radisic, Lenore de la Perrelle, Richard Woodman, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald, Susan Kurrle, Ian D. Cameron, Craig Whitehead, Jane Thompson, Billingsley Kaambwa, Kate Hayes (+1 others)
2020 Implementation Science Communications  
Background Non-pharmacological interventions including physical activity programmes, occupational therapy and caregiver education programmes have been shown to lead to better outcomes for people with dementia and their care partners. Yet, there are gaps between what is recommended in guidelines and what happens in practice. The aim of this study was to bring together clinicians working in dementia care and establish a quality improvement collaborative. The aim of the quality improvement
more » ... ative was to increase self-reported guideline adherence to three guideline recommendations. Methods Interrupted time series. We recruited health professionals from community, hospital and aged care settings across Australia to join the collaborative. Members of the collaborative participated in a start-up meeting, completed an online learning course with clinical and quality improvement content, formed a quality improvement plan which was reviewed by a team of experts, received feedback following an audit of their current practice and were able to share experiences with their peers. The primary outcome was self-reported adherence to their guideline recommendation of interest which was measured using checklists. Data were collected monthly over a period of 18 months, and the study used an interrupted time series design and multilevel Poisson regression analysis to evaluate changes in self-reported adherence. Results A total of 45 health professionals (78% therapists) from different sites joined the collaborative and 28 completed all requirements. Data from 1717 checklists were included in the analyses. Over the duration of the project, there was a significant increase in clinician self-reported adherence to guideline recommendations with a 42.1% immediate increase in adherence (incidence rate ratio = 1.42; 95% confidence interval = 1.08–1.87; p = 0.012). Conclusion Health professionals working with people with dementia are interested in and willing to join a quality improvement collaborative with the goal of improving non-pharmacological aspects of care. Participation in the collaborative improved the quality of care for people with dementia as measured through self-reported adherence to guideline recommendations. Although there are challenges in implementation of guideline recommendations within dementia care, the quality improvement collaborative method was considered successful. A strength was that it equipped and empowered clinicians to lead improvement activities and allowed for heterogeneity in terms of service and setting. Trial registration ACTRN12618000268246
doi:10.1186/s43058-020-00073-x pmid:32984846 pmcid:PMC7513321 fatcat:bpkhxksqnrajbjmin5nyhc2fgy

HOW, WHY AND UNDER WHAT CIRCUMSTANCES DOES A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT COLLABORATIVE BUILD KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS IN CLINICIANS WORKING WITH PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA? A REALIST INFORMED PROCESS EVALUATION [article]

Lenore A de la Perrelle, Monica Cations, Gaery Barbery, Garjana Radisic, Billingsley Kaambwa, Maria Crotty, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald, Susan Kurrle, Ian D. Cameron, Craig Whitehead, Jane Thompson, Kate Laver
2020 medRxiv   pre-print
In increasingly constrained health and aged care services, strategies are needed to improve quality and translate evidence into practice. In dementia care, recent failures in quality and safety have led the World Health Organisation to prioritise the translation of known evidence into practice. While quality improvement collaboratives have been widely used in healthcare, there are few examples in dementia care. We describe a recent quality improvement collaborative to improve dementia care
more » ... s Australia and assess the implementation outcomes of acceptability and feasibility of this strategy to translate known evi-dence into practice. A realist-informed process evaluation was used to analyse how, why and under what circumstances a quality improvement collaborative built knowledge and skills in clinicians working in dementia care. This realist-informed process evaluation developed, tested, and refined the program theory of a quality improvement collaborative. Data were collected pre-and post-intervention using surveys and interviews with participants (n=24). A combined inductive and deductive data analysis process integrated three frameworks to examine the context and mechanisms of knowledge and skill building in participant clinicians. A refined program theory showed how and why clinicians built knowledge and skills in quality improvement in dementia care. Seven mechanisms were identified: motivation, accountability, identity, collective learning, credibility, and reflective practice. Each of these mechanisms operated differently according to context. A quality improvement collaborative designed for clinicians in different contexts and roles was acceptable and feasible in building knowledge and skills of clinicians to improve dementia care. A supportive setting and a credible, flexible, and collaborative process optimises quality improvement knowledge and skills in clinicians working with people with dementia.
doi:10.1101/2020.08.05.20169185 fatcat:qnjvqddijzcijfadp4eltpjwzu

How, why and under what circumstances does a quality improvement collaborative build knowledge and skills in clinicians working with people with dementia? A realist informed process evaluation

Lenore de la Perrelle, Monica Cations, Gaery Barbery, Gorjana Radisic, Billingsley Kaambwa, Maria Crotty, Janna Anneke Fitzgerald, Susan Kurrle, Ian Cameron, Craig Whitehead, Jane Thompson, Kate Laver
2021 BMJ Open Quality  
In increasingly constrained health and aged care services, strategies are needed to improve quality and translate evidence into practice. In dementia care, recent failures in quality and safety have led the WHO to prioritise the translation of known evidence into practice. While quality improvement collaboratives have been widely used in healthcare, there are few examples in dementia care.We describe a recent quality improvement collaborative to improve dementia care across Australia and assess
more » ... the implementation outcomes of acceptability and feasibility of this strategy to translate known evidence into practice. A realist-informed process evaluation was used to analyse how, why and under what circumstances a quality improvement collaborative built knowledge and skills in clinicians working in dementia care.This realist-informed process evaluation developed, tested and refined the programme theory of a quality improvement collaborative. Data were collected pre-intervention and post-intervention using surveys and interviews with participants (n=28). A combined inductive and deductive data analysis process integrated three frameworks to examine the context and mechanisms of knowledge and skill building in participant clinicians.A refined program theory showed how and why clinicians built knowledge and skills in quality improvement in dementia care. Six mechanisms were identified: motivation, accountability, identity, collective learning, credibility and reflective practice. These mechanisms, in combination, operated to overcome constraints, role boundaries and pessimism about improved practice in dementia care.A quality improvement collaborative designed for clinicians in different contexts and roles was acceptable and feasible in building knowledge, skills and confidence of clinicians to improve dementia care. Supportive reflective practice and a credible, flexible and collaborative process optimised quality improvement knowledge and skills in clinicians working with people with dementia.Trial registration numberACTRN12618000268246.
doi:10.1136/bmjoq-2020-001147 pmid:33990392 fatcat:ppqcyd44lrc4zhj5iyyiopjo5q

Guest Editors' Introduction on eHealth and Services Computing in Healthcare

Carolyn McGregor, Anthony Maeder
2009 Journal of Theoretical and Applied Electronic Commerce Research  
The second paper entitled "Using Visual Analytics to Improve Hospital Scheduling and Patient Flow" co-authored by Janna Anneke Fitzgerald and Ann Dadich presents an innovative approach to extend the lean  ... 
doi:10.4067/s0718-18762009000200001 fatcat:u2udo3rsxzectoyk7mnpzg3wc4

Tuesday posters

2005 Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry  
Varughese; Jafri Sayed; Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ TP 059 Open Access Analysis of Pharmaceutical Compounds using Accurate Mass and True Isotopic Pattern; Carsten Baessmann 1 ; Anneke  ...  Watson; Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI TP 347 A MS Method for the Analysis of Partially Folded Protein Conformations; Susie Yuan Dai 1 ; Kendall D Powell 2 ; Xiaoye Yang 1 ; Michael C Fitzgerald  ... 
doi:10.1016/j.jasms.2005.03.045 fatcat:jowj7ogfnjgufjh2gaci4gjabm
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