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Editorial Foreword

2021 Journal of Asian Studies  
Alter Editorial Foreword available at https://www.cambridge.org/core/terms. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0021911821001558 Downloaded from https://www.cambridge.org/core.  ... 
doi:10.1017/s0021911821001558 fatcat:mghgiaqmcjapjgf7zxztt5xxmi

Editorial foreword

Sanjay Awasthi
2007 Biologics : Targets & Therapy  
pmid:19707317 pmcid:PMC2721307 fatcat:j2bcp55iyvcgpeu6svzjzsn7wu

Editorial Foreword

1995 Comparative Studies in Society and History  
Editorial Foreword Post-Revolutionary Stress Syndromes. Among the continuities that persist through revolutionary change, there are none more poignant than disillusionment and hope.  ... 
doi:10.1017/s0010417500019897 fatcat:xkfrla7suvffrbctszhmq7wbty

Editorial Foreword

Andrew Arsan, John Karam, Akram Khater
2013 Mashriq & Mahjar  
doi:10.24847/11i2013.11 fatcat:qv3tidyxove5nncyqw3pbmna24

Editorial Foreword

1990 Comparative Studies in Society and History  
People, Power, and Revolution. The French Revolution remains the magnetic pole by which our compasses are calibrated. It separates old regime and modern society, measures the capacity of the state-marks the rise of nationalism, and remains the model of revolution, an endless morality tale about the demand for democracy and its dangers. Although much that has been written about the Revolution, especially in bicentennial outpourings, takes a tone of final moral judgment, smoke rising from the
more » ... lefields of interpretation has not altogether obscured some classic questions. Among these, the issue of what rural Frenchmen sought on the eve of Revolution has, as John Markoff shows, been pivotal to explanations of how the revolution came about (in CSSH see Skocpol, 18:2, and Hunt, 18:3). Arguments about the role of ideas, class interests, and social structure all make claims about what the peasants wanted (compare Scott, 29:3; Mitchell, 21:1). Many rest those claims on the cahiers de doleances, which may be the most cited historical source since the Donation of Constantine, and it is to these that Markoff also turns. Using computer-based analysis, he lays out a vista never seen before by closely analyzing specific demands. The rural society he discovers, although immersed in its own concerns, also expressed a coherent set of attitudes about particular policies that constituted a shared sense of citizenship, of rights, and of the proper role of the state.
doi:10.1017/s0010417500016571 fatcat:jcucm5jusnedzimha5i33ndgn4

Editorial Foreword

Maitrii Aung-Thwin
2019 Journal of Southeast Asian Studies  
This present issue features research that explores how local categories of identity, status and territory have been constructed over time and space. Though not compiled as a special issue, the six feature articles share a remarkable focus on how notions of community have been epistemologically constructed by both state and non-state actors, providing insight into the different ways and contexts that social groups within the region have articulated their place in the world. All six have a
more » ... cal bent to them, based on sources such as inscriptions, indigenous chronicles, colonial records and contemporary oral interviews in the vernacular. At the same time, the articles are refreshingly interdisciplinary, drawing from and contributing to theoretical discussions concerning anthropology, linguistics, epigraphy, and geography. Our lead article, 'The killing of Posthouder Scheerder and Jifar Folfolun (The War of the Breasts): Malukan and Dutch narratives of an incident in the waning days of the VOC' by A. Ross Gordon, Sonny A. Djonler and Hans Hägerdal, examines how a violent incident in Dutch colonial history has been remembered and preserved in the collective memory of the Batuley, a non-literate people located in today's Aru, Indonesia. Juxtaposed against Dutch colonial sources, the authors investigate how the memory of a murdered colonial officer is preserved in saab and mare, forms of Arunese song that also represent the Batuley communities that perform them. Importantly, the authors discover there is more than one 'local' understanding of the event via the range of songs that speakor rather singto the event, representing the range of memories associated with local tradition. Methodologically, the authors ask us to consider how to deal with a field of study where indigenous language sources are simply lacking. As in the previous article by Gordon et al., Aurore Candier's article 'Mapping ethnicity in nineteenth century Burma: When "categories of people" (lumyo) became "nations"' looks at how local notions of personhood and identity were interpreted and categorised by British and American missionary administrative projects in Myanmar. By focusing on the category of lumyo (categories of people) and tracing its historical construction over the span of the nineteenth century, Candier shows how the contingencies of war and annexation were intricately connected to how local communities, peripheries, and foreign-ness were represented. By presenting the semantic evolution of these concepts in the context of conquest, Candier argues that 'lumyo' was progressively associated with the European concept of 'nations', an understanding that would eventually be adopted by nationalist groups and ethnic minorities in the early twentieth century. Just as the Aru and Batuley were shaped out of a narrative of counterinsurgency, so too were early notions of race, nation, and place shaped out of the mechanics of annexation of the Burmese Kingdom in the early 1800s. Territorial conquest and its effect on social constructions of place is a key theme in the next article by Kisho Tsuchiya. His 'Representing Timor: Histories, geo-bodies,
doi:10.1017/s002246341900047x fatcat:gb3s7winpzdnnaw76eccvxt2y4

Editorial Foreword

2006 Comparative Studies in Society and History  
has guided it for the better part of nine years (eight and three-quarters, to be exact), with help from his friends: Associate Editor Diane Owen Hughes; Managing Editors James Reische and David Akin; Editorial  ...  LaCoss, Ryan Hudson, Meredith Martin, Dan Bass, Najeeb Jan, Genese Sodikoff and Michael Hathaway; Book Review Editors Julia Adams, Ann Laura Stoler, Andrew Shryock, and Stuart Kirsch; members of the Editorial  ... 
doi:10.1017/s001041750600020x fatcat:l3dgluf3mzgznioowchz3p5uo4

Editorial Foreword

Maurizio Peleggi
2014 Journal of Southeast Asian Studies  
As this is the first issue of JSEAS for 2014, the Editorial Board and I take this opportunity to wish a serene and professionally satisfying new year to our readers, and in particular to those colleagues  ... 
doi:10.1017/s0022463413000817 fatcat:2vgxxstd2jfexblau76j3n4eui

Editorial Foreword

John Jarick, Yvonne Sherwood
2013 Journal for the Study of the Old Testament  
doi:10.1177/0309089213479572 fatcat:bcif2pgyabemtl2vwts3aovzkq

Editorial Foreword

James H.S. Bossard
1921 The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science  
Despite these and other shortcomings of editorial architecture, it is hoped that the final result has been a volume not only of interest to the general reader but also, perhaps, of some value to the busy  ... 
doi:10.1177/000271622109800101 fatcat:6s4vhafx7va5hggc22c46osgua

Editorial Foreword

2009 Comparative Studies in Society and History  
Editorial Foreword FREE AND FORCED LABOR The belief that free labor is better than forced labor is one of the ethical certainties of our age.  ... 
doi:10.1017/s0010417509990193 fatcat:ftphy5c6yvdz5p4ybmo6iy2xmq
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