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John H. Millett

Kenneth N. Ciboski, David N. Farnsworth, Melvin A. Kahn, James W. McKenney, James F. Sheffield, John E. Stanga
1997 PS: Political Science and Politics  
Ciboski David N. Farnsworth (emeritus) Melvin A. Kahn James W. McKenney James F. Sheffield, Jr. John E. Stanga Wichita State University Donald E. Stokes Donald E.  ...  Millett John H. Millett, emeritus professor of political science at Wichita State University, died January 26th at age 77 in Sarosota, Florida, following complications from heartbypass surgery.  ... 
doi:10.1017/s1049096500043493 fatcat:madzgbzitjey5oqke4xx4zdq5u

Vulnerability of Northern Prairie Wetlands to Climate Change

W. CARTER JOHNSON, BRUCE V. MILLETT, TAGIR GILMANOV, RICHARD A. VOLDSETH, GLENN R. GUNTENSPERGEN, DAVID E. NAUGLE
2005 BioScience  
David E. Naugle is a professor of wildlife at the University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812. © 2005 American Institute of Biological Sciences. ).  ...  Carter Johnson (e-mail: carter.johnson@sdstate Vulnerability of Northern Prairie Wetlands to Climate Change (wetland basins with standing water).  ... 
doi:10.1641/0006-3568(2005)055[0863:vonpwt]2.0.co;2 fatcat:oayqx5mrobbmvi3ddsshko2ggm

Dynamic Expiratory Tracheal Collapse in COPD

Phillip M. Boiselle, Gaetane Michaud, David H. Roberts, Stephen H. Loring, Hilary M. Womble, Mary E. Millett, Carl R. O'Donnell
2012 Chest  
E xcessive expiratory tracheal collapse may occur due to either weakness of the supporting tracheal cartilaginous structures (tracheomalacia [TM]) or from excessive anterior bulging of the posterior membranous  ...  Ms Millett: contributed to study concepts, clinical/laboratory studies, data acquisition, and manuscript revision/review and fi nal version approval.  ...  Boiselle, MD, FCCP, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Ave, Boston, MA 02215; e-mail: pboisell@bidmc. harvard.edu © 2012 American College of Chest Physicians.  ... 
doi:10.1378/chest.12-0299 pmid:22722230 pmcid:PMC3515027 fatcat:zih33sib2rcslget6kr4ns6dqm

Electrocorticogram encoding of upper extremity movement trajectories [article]

Po T. Wang, Christine E. King, Andrew Schombs, Jack J. Lin, Mona Sazgar, Frank P. K. Hsu, Susan J. Shaw, David E. Millett, Charles Y. Liu, Luis A. Chui, Zoran Nenadic, An H. Do
2014 arXiv   pre-print
E.  ...  There were no instances where an electrode Electrode was found to be correlated to flexion and not to extension (and vice versa). ρ(P F ,θ F ) ρ(P I ,θ I ) ρ(P EE ) Flex 2) Non-M1 Areas: In an ancillary  ... 
arXiv:1402.5996v1 fatcat:dvh2wrdk7nacrau4fl3zfxdiia

Extreme gender-based post-fledging brood division in the toc-toc

Luciana B. Vega, Graham J. Holloway, James E. Millett, David S. Richardson
2007 Behavioral Ecology  
The possibility that parents of one sex may preferentially invest in offspring of a certain sex raises profound evolutionary questions about the relative worth of sons and daughters to their mothers and fathers. Post-fledging brood division-in which each parent feeds a different subset of offspring-has been well documented in birds. However, a lack of empirical evidence that this may be based on offspring sex, combined with the theoretical difficulty of explaining such an interaction, has led
more » ... searchers to consider a gender bias in post-fledging brood division highly unlikely. Here we show that in the toc-toc, Foudia sechellarum, postfledging brood division is extreme and determined by sex; where brood composition allows, male parents exclusively provision male fledglings, whereas female parents provision female fledglings. This is the first study to provide unambiguous evidence, based on molecular sexing, that sex-biased post-fledging brood division can occur in birds. Male and female parents provisioned at the same rate and neither offspring nor parent survival appeared to be affected by the sex of the parent or offspring, respectively. The current hypotheses predicting advantages for brood division and preferential care for one specific type of offspring are discussed in the light of our results.
doi:10.1093/beheco/arm038 fatcat:u6uvpczienf7pbzqamfafefsqm

Dynamic Expiratory Tracheal Collapse in Morbidly Obese COPD Patients

Phillip M. Boiselle, Diana E. Litmanovich, Gaetane Michaud, David H. Roberts, Stephen H. Loring, Hilary M. Womble, Mary E. Millett, Carl R. O'Donnell
2013 COPD: Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  
Th e authors report no confl icts of interest. Th e authors alone are responsible for the content and writing of the paper.  ...  Th e recruitment and study methods for these participants have been previously reported.  ...  Th e total scanning time for each volumetric acquisition of the entire lungs was approximately 2.5 seconds.  ... 
doi:10.3109/15412555.2013.781149 pmid:23837455 fatcat:ofya5cve2ffknk6xy32w2p7kre

Prairie Wetland Complexes as Landscape Functional Units in a Changing Climate

W. Carter Johnson, Brett Werner, Glenn R. Guntenspergen, Richard A. Voldseth, Bruce Millett, David E. Naugle, Mirela Tulbure, Rosemary W. H. Carroll, John Tracy, Craig Olawsky
2010 BioScience  
a 10-day time step; (d) the use of STELLA rather than MATHEMATICA (Wolfram 1999) as the modeling software platform (use of trade or product name does not imply endorsement by the US government); and (e)  ...  to climate change, and longer-hydroperiod wetlands are perhaps the most sensitive; (d) shortened wetland hydroperiods will severely affect vertebrates because of their longer life-cycle requirements; (e)  ... 
doi:10.1525/bio.2010.60.2.7 fatcat:xjrhko4lmfgr7lnx2l2wj43lve

Expression of the Distalless-B gene in Ciona is regulated by a pan-ectodermal enhancer module

Steven Q. Irvine, David A. Vierra, Brad J. Millette, Matthew D. Blanchette, Rachel E. Holbert
2011 Developmental Biology  
(A-E) CiDB-A whole cluster construct β-galactosidase staining pattern. (B, C) Animal and vegetal views, respectively, at early gastrula stage.  ...  E-mail address: steven.irvine@uri.edu (S.Q. Irvine). Developmental Biology 353 (2011) 432-439 0012-1606/$ -see front matter © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.  ... 
doi:10.1016/j.ydbio.2011.02.009 pmid:21338600 pmcid:PMC3081900 fatcat:a2fxjjibqjbh7g5eyu5pbhe32e

Distinct contributions of frontal areas to emotion and social behaviour in the rat

Peter H. Rudebeck, Mark E. Walton, Benjamin H. P. Millette, Elizabeth Shirley, Matthew F. S. Rushworth, David M. Bannerman
2007 European Journal of Neuroscience  
Although the lesions of patients with impaired social behaviour encompass both orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex (OFC and ACC), attempts to model such impairments in animals have focused on the OFC. However, recent neuroimaging attempts to identify the neural correlates of social interaction have emphasized the relative importance of ACC. Here we report the effect of circumscribed excitotoxic lesions of either OFC or ACC on ethological, unconditioned tests of emotion and social
more » ... ur in the Lister hooded rat. OFC lesions altered emotional responsiveness to stimuli in non-social, fear-inducing situations (hyponeophagia test), and produced a small but statistically significant increase in aggression to other rats, but did not compromise other aspects of social interaction and appraisal. ACC lesions did, however, affect the utilization of social information. Specifically, ACC lesions diminished interest in other individuals and caused a relative reduction in memory for social stimuli. Whereas normal animals habituated to repeated presentations of the same individual, the poor performance of ACC animals entailed continued higher levels of responsiveness to repeated presentations of the same individual. The ACC impairment cannot simply be attributed to a general reduction in arousal, or a general impairment in recognition memory. Neither lesion affected anxiety per se (successive alleys test). Further analyses were conducted to investigate whether the changes in aggressive and social behaviour were related to different aspects of decision-making. Although the relationship between changes in social interaction and decision-making after ACC lesions is unclear, OFC impairments in emotionality were correlated with increased impulsive choice.
doi:10.1111/j.1460-9568.2007.05844.x pmid:17927774 pmcid:PMC2228395 fatcat:ppnpwh6o65hdpbk44mhueiwz7y

Extracting kinetic information from human motor cortical signals

Robert D. Flint, Po T. Wang, Zachary A. Wright, Christine E. King, Max O. Krucoff, Stephan U. Schuele, Joshua M. Rosenow, Frank P.K. Hsu, Charles Y. Liu, Jack J. Lin, Mona Sazgar, David E. Millett (+4 others)
2014 NeuroImage  
Brain machine interfaces (BMIs) have the potential to provide intuitive control of neuroprostheses to restore grasp to patients with paralyzed or amputated upper limbs. For these neuroprostheses to function, the ability to accurately control grasp force is critical. Grasp force can be decoded from neuronal spikes in monkeys, and hand kinematics can be decoded using electrocorticogram (ECoG) signals recorded from the surface of the human motor cortex. We hypothesized that kinetic information
more » ... t grasping could also be extracted from ECoG, and sought to decode continuously-graded grasp force. In this study, we decoded isometric pinch force with high accuracy from ECoG in 10 human subjects. The predicted signals explained from 22% to 88% (60 ± 6%, mean ± SE) of the variance in the actual force generated. We also decoded muscle activity in the finger flexors, with similar accuracy to force decoding. We found that high gamma band and time domain features of the ECoG signal were most informative about kinetics, similar to our previous findings with intracortical LFPs. In addition, we found that peak cortical representations of force applied by the index and little fingers were separated by only about 4 mm. Thus, ECoG can be used to decode not only kinematics, but also kinetics of movement. This is an important step toward restoring intuitively-controlled grasp to impaired patients.
doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.07.049 pmid:25094020 fatcat:xvlxrdb2yrbozmwqwap6azbrcu

Electrocorticogram encoding of upper extremity movement duration

Po T. Wang, Christine E. King, Colin M. McCrimmon, Susan J. Shaw, David E. Millett, Charles Y. Liu, Luis A. Chui, Zoran Nenadic, An H. Do
2014 2014 36th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society  
Movement type Fast Moderate Slow Pincer Grasp (PG) 0.35 s 0.75 s 1.5 s Elbow (E) 0.65 s 1.30 s 2.6 s Shoulder F/E (SFE) 0.75 s 1.5 s 3.0 s Idle 1.0 s 2.0 s 3.0 s TABLE II THE II MAXIMUM COEFFICIENT OF  ...  In addition, the area of high R 2 increased for E and SFE movements, compared to PG movements.  ... 
doi:10.1109/embc.2014.6943822 pmid:25570190 pmcid:PMC6508956 fatcat:gtrt7nloajcndmpxw4tyavs5eu

Electrocorticogram encoding of upper extremity movement trajectories

Po T. Wang, Christine E. King, Andrew Schombs, Jack J. Lin, Mona Sazgar, Frank P.K. Hsu, Susan J. Shaw, David E. Millett, Charles Y. Liu, Luis A. Chui, Zoran Nenadic, An H. Do
2013 2013 6th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)  
E.  ...  There were no instances where an electrode Electrode was found to be correlated to flexion and not to extension (and vice versa). ρ(P F ,θ F ) ρ(P I ,θ I ) ρ(P EE ) Flex 2) Non-M1 Areas: In an ancillary  ... 
doi:10.1109/ner.2013.6696212 fatcat:o4l22czufneqppimct43fc377u

Impact of banning smoking in cars with children on exposure to second-hand smoke: a natural experiment in England and Scotland [article]

Anthony Laverty, Thomas Hone, Phili E Anyanwu, David Taylor Robinson, Frank de Vocht, Christopher Millett, Nicholas Hopkinson
2019 biorxiv/medrxiv   pre-print
A ban on smoking in cars with children was implemented in April 2015 in England and December 2016 in Scotland. With survey data from both countries (NEngland=3,483-6,920 and NScotland=232-319), we used this natural experiment to assess the impact of the ban using a difference-in-differences approach. We conducted logistic regression analyses within a Difference-in-Difference framework and adjusted for age, sex, a marker of deprivation and survey weighting for non-response. Among children aged
more » ... -15 years, self-reported levels of regular exposure to smoke in cars were 3.4% in 2012, 2.2% in 2014 and 1.3% in 2016 for Scotland and 6.3%, 5.9% and 1.6% in England. The ban was associated with a 73% reduction (95%CI -59%, -81%) in self-reported exposure to tobacco smoke among children.
doi:10.1101/19006353 fatcat:lv5jrsxiebgqjcfpp3xwrgbx6i

State and trajectory decoding of upper extremity movements from electrocorticogram

Po T. Wang, Eric J. Puttock, Christine E. King, Andrew Schombs, Jack J. Lin, Mona Sazgar, Frank P.K. Hsu, Susan J. Shaw, David E. Millett, Charles Y. Liu, Luis A. Chui, An H. Do (+1 others)
2013 2013 6th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)  
movements on the side contralateral to their ECoG grid: 1. pincer grasp and release (PG); 2. wrist flexion and extension (W); 3. forearm pronation and supination (PS), 4. elbow flexion and extension (E)  ...  S M Pc (%) ρ M 1 PG 81, 85 0.66, 0.68 W 83, 89 0.52, 0.46 2 PG 89, 73 0.62, 0.54 E 80, 80 0.53, 0.44 SR 80, 68 0.53, 0.62 SF 87, 82 0.69, 0.53 3 PG 88, 89 0.80, 0.76 Avg. 84, 81  ... 
doi:10.1109/ner.2013.6696097 fatcat:mue3zxeo6nbexgq3fjl3hy6t74

A co-registration approach for electrocorticogram electrode localization using post-implantation MRI and CT of the head

Po T. Wang, Christine E. King, Susan J. Shaw, David E. Millett, Charles Y. Liu, Luis A. Chui, Zoran Nenadic, An H. Do
2013 2013 6th International IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering (NER)  
E.  ...  Fig. 1C shows the results of the successful electrode segmentation (see Section II-E).  ... 
doi:10.1109/ner.2013.6695987 fatcat:epykx6jfj5h63j5wdyq5kjvg7e
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