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DICKINSON, John et Brian YOUNG, Brève histoire socio-économique du Québec. Sillery, Le Septentrion, 1992. 383 p

Jean-François Cardin
1993 Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française  
Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française DICKINSON, John et Brian YOUNG, Brève histoire socio-économique du Québec. Sillery, Le Septentrion, 1992. 383 p.  ...  DICKINSON, John et Brian YOUNG, Brève histoire socio-économique du Québec. Sillery, Le Septentrion, 1992. 383 p. La publication d'une synthèse est toujours un événement historiographique attendu.  ...  La Brève histoire socio-économique du Québec des professeurs Dickinson et Young, malgré certains défauts de forme, est une synthèse dans l'ensemble fort valable et un apport justifié à l'historiographie  ... 
doi:10.7202/305193ar fatcat:ixp3ce43nnb3laco3gyaw7gxde

John A. Dickinson et Brian Young, Brève histoire socio-économique du Québec (quatrième édition), Québec, Septentrion, 2009, 455 p

Sébastien Arcand
2012 Recherches sociographiques  
Dickinson et Brian Young, Brève histoire socio-économique du Québec (quatrième édition), Québec, Septentrion, 2009, 455 p.  ...  HEC Montréal sebastien.arcand@hec.ca RÉFÉRENCE Little, J.I. 1989 Recension de l'ouvrage de Brian Young et John A.  ... 
doi:10.7202/1012410ar fatcat:j66llw2m2zburcq5rnlqgtpo3e

YOUNG, Brian et John A. DICKINSON, A Short History of Quebec: A Socio-Economic Perspective (Mississauga, Copp Clark Pitman Ltd., 1988)

Jack I. Little
1989 Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française  
YOUNG, Brian et John A. DICKINSON, A Short History of Quebec: a Socio- Economie Perspective (Mississauga, Copp Clark Pitman Ltd., 1988) . Brian Young et John A.  ...  Dickinson affirment que deux objectifs principaux les ont poussés à écrire ce manuel d'histoire québécoise: initier les étudiants anglophones aux interprétations et recherches écrites en français et fournir  ... 
doi:10.7202/304779ar fatcat:is3cnacfa5cctgloypspxkzje4

Inferring Nighttime Satellite Imagery from Human Mobility [article]

Brian Dickinson, Gourab Ghoshal, Xerxes Dotiwalla, Adam Sadilek, Henry Kautz
2020 arXiv   pre-print
Nighttime lights satellite imagery has been used for decades as a uniform, global source of data for studying a wide range of socioeconomic factors. Recently, another more terrestrial source is producing data with similarly uniform global coverage: anonymous and aggregated smart phone location. This data, which measures the movement patterns of people and populations rather than the light they produce, could prove just as valuable in decades to come. In fact, since human mobility is far more
more » ... ectly related to the socioeconomic variables being predicted, it has an even greater potential. Additionally, since cell phone locations can be aggregated in real time while preserving individual user privacy, it will be possible to conduct studies that would previously have been impossible because they require data from the present. Of course, it will take quite some time to establish the new techniques necessary to apply human mobility data to problems traditionally studied with satellite imagery and to conceptualize and develop new real time applications. In this study we demonstrate that it is possible to accelerate this process by inferring artificial nighttime satellite imagery from human mobility data, while maintaining a strong differential privacy guarantee. We also show that these artificial maps can be used to infer socioeconomic variables, often with greater accuracy than using actual satellite imagery. Along the way, we find that the relationship between mobility and light emissions is both nonlinear and varies considerably around the globe. Finally, we show that models based on human mobility can significantly improve our understanding of society at a global scale.
arXiv:2003.07691v1 fatcat:g72ah7lfn5habhv7izqxtrao4e

The Evolution of Cooperation by the Hankshaw Effect [article]

Sarah P Hammarlund, Brian D Connelly, Katherine J Dickinson, Benjamin Kerr
2015 bioRxiv   pre-print
The evolution of cooperation—costly behavior that benefits others—faces one clear obstacle. Namely, cooperators are always at a competitive disadvantage relative to defectors, individuals that reap the same social benefits, but evade the personal cost. One solution to this problem involves genetic hitchhiking, where the allele encoding cooperative behavior becomes linked to a beneficial mutation. While traditionally seen as a passive process driven purely by chance, here we explore a more
more » ... form of hitchhiking. Specifically, we model hitchhiking in the context of adaptation to a stressful environment by cooperators and defectors with spatially limited dispersal. Under such conditions, clustered cooperators reach higher local densities, thereby experiencing more opportunities for mutations than defectors. Thus, the allele encoding cooperation has a greater probability of hitchhiking with alleles conferring stress adaptation. We label this probabilistic enhancement the "Hankshaw effect" after the character Sissy Hankshaw, whose anomalously large thumbs made her a singularly effective hitchhiker. Using an agent-based model, we demonstrate that there exists a broad set of conditions allowing the evolution of cooperation through the Hankshaw effect. We discuss the feasibility of our theoretical assumptions for natural systems, not only for the case of cooperation, but also for other costly social behaviors such as spite. The primary elements of our model, including genetic hitchhiking and population structure, have been discussed separately in previous models exploring the evolution of cooperation. However, the combination of these elements has not been appreciated as a solution to the problem of cooperation.
doi:10.1101/016667 fatcat:hywkwjk37je77afk6zqo7p2niq

Sentiment Analysis of Investor Opinions on Twitter

Brian Dickinson, Wei Hu
2015 Social Networking  
The rapid growth of social networks has produced an unprecedented amount of user-generated data, which provides an excellent opportunity for text mining. Sentiment analysis, an important part of text mining, attempts to learn about the authors' opinion on a text through its content and structure. Such information is particularly valuable for determining the overall opinion of a large number of people. Examples of the usefulness of this are predicting box office sales or stock prices. One of the
more » ... most accessible sources of user-generated data is Twitter, which makes the majority of its user data freely available through its data access API. In this study we seek to predict a sentiment value for stock related tweets on Twitter, and demonstrate a correlation between this sentiment and the movement of a company's stock price in a real time streaming environment. Both n-gram and "word2vec" textual representation techniques are used alongside a random forest classification algorithm to predict the sentiment of tweets. These values are then evaluated for correlation between stock prices and Twitter sentiment for that each company. There are significant correlations between price and sentiment for several individual companies. Some companies such as Microsoft and Walmart show strong positive correlation, while others such as Goldman Sachs and Cisco Systems show strong negative correlation. This suggests that consumer facing companies are affected differently than other companies. Overall this appears to be a promising field for future research.
doi:10.4236/sn.2015.43008 fatcat:3xlkkmae2jhx3jbq6yubl5cr44

Negative Niche Construction Favors the Evolution of Cooperation [article]

Brian D Connelly, Katherine J Dickinson, Sarah P Hammarlund, Benjamin Kerr
2015 biorxiv/medrxiv   pre-print
By benefitting others at a cost to themselves, cooperators face an ever present threat from defectors---individuals that avail themselves of the cooperative benefit without contributing. A longstanding challenge to evolutionary biology is to understand the mechanisms that support the many instances of cooperation that nevertheless exist. Hammarlund et al. recently demonstrated that cooperation can persist by hitchhiking along with beneficial non-social adaptations. Importantly, cooperators play
more » ... an active role in this process. In spatially-structured environments, clustered cooperator populations reach greater densities, which creates more mutational opportunities to gain beneficial non-social adaptations. Cooperation rises in abundance by association with these adaptations. However, once adaptive opportunities have been exhausted, the ride abruptly ends as cooperators are displaced by adapted defectors. Using an agent-based model, we demonstrate that the selective feedback that is created as populations construct their local niches can maintain cooperation indefinitely. This cooperator success depends specifically on negative niche construction, which acts as a perpetual source of adaptive opportunities. As populations adapt, they alter their environment in ways that reveal additional opportunities for adaptation. Despite being independent of niche construction in our model, cooperation feeds this cycle. By reaching larger densities, populations of cooperators are better able to adapt to changes in their constructed niche and successfully respond to the constant threat posed by defectors. We relate these findings to previous studies from the niche construction literature and discuss how this model could be extended to provide a greater understanding of how cooperation evolves in the complex environments in which it is found.
doi:10.1101/018994 fatcat:aumls53ktvgh5p3rtdv4z2boxm

Community, Caring And Outdoor Education

John Quay, Stewart Dickinson, Brian Nettleton
2000 Journal of Outdoor and Environmental Education  
In this article we discuss the close ties that exist between the concepts of community and caring on the one hand, and the teaching and learning strategies which are relevant to these concepts in the area of outdoor education on the other. We begin by gauging the extent of our human need for community. The existence of this need leads into an exploration of the ways in which this need can be met in our Western society, which tends to favour the individual. Caring is identified as a major method
more » ... for achieving community. Ways of educating for caring and community are then revealed through the literature and these are placed, as one would a template, over the existing view of outdoor education to look for any connections and commonalities. These commonalities are identified. The caring person is one who is genuinely other-regarding, who perceives and responds to the larger ecosystem in an empathic, nonprejudicial way. He or she acts in ways that will strengthen, both in themselves and in others, a developing capacity for the healthy expression of life. (Fuller, 1992, p. 74)
doi:10.1007/bf03400636 fatcat:zw7xrxg6o5gfdffi2fanfoeqie

Determining Leaders and Communities on Networks Using Neighborhood Similarity

Benjamin Valyou, Brian Dickinson, Wei Hu
2014 Social Networking  
A new network with a known ground truth membership is the Pilgrim network introduced by Brian Dickinson [7] .  ... 
doi:10.4236/sn.2014.31006 fatcat:z4yqs34ffrh63l5unnkcavoczm

The Yellow River in transition

Michael Webber, Jon Barnett, Mark Wang, Brian Finlayson, Debbie Dickinson
2008 Environmental Science and Policy  
Brian Finlayson is associate professor in the School of Resource Management and Geography. His PhD is from Bristol University.  ...  Debbie Dickinson is a Honours BA graduate in development studies from the University of Melbourne. Her honours thesis concerned resettlement in the mountains and grasslands of Inner Mongolia.  ... 
doi:10.1016/j.envsci.2008.02.002 fatcat:4yjsfrhaebb2lccijjaweg2zqm

A Transient Temperature Solution for Bore-Hole Model Testing

Brian Hanson, Robert E. Dickinson
1987 Journal of Glaciology  
Transient temperature variations in a vertical column of ice with horizontally uniform conditions, constant vertical strain-rate and specified surface temperature, and basal heat flux can be calculated analytically. The solution consists of eigenfunctions which are forms of the confluent hypergeometric function. This solution shows that advection and diffusion have clearly separated areas of dominance, with diffusion being a sufficient approximation for small-scale perturbations in the
more » ... re profile and advection placing an upper limit on the response time of the ice sheet as a whole. This solution is useful for analysis and testing of numerical models, for evaluation of the response time of an ice sheet and for exploratory analysis of real bore-hole data. The lowest eigenvalue of the solution determines the time-scale for transient decay of temperature anomalies. The time-scale can be determined for more general strain-rates using a finite-difference approximation to the linearized energy-balance equation.
doi:10.3189/s0022143000008613 fatcat:qo3fknriefbzzdi3dfighwug3m

A Transient Temperature Solution for Bore-Hole Model Testing

Brian Hanson, Robert E. Dickinson
1987 Journal of Glaciology  
Transient temperature variations in a vertical column of ice with horizontally uniform conditions, constant vertical strain-rate and specified surface temperature, and basal heat flux can be calculated analytically. The solution consists of eigenfunctions which are forms of the confluent hypergeometric function. This solution shows that advection and diffusion have clearly separated areas of dominance, with diffusion being a sufficient approximation for small-scale perturbations in the
more » ... re profile and advection placing an upper limit on the response time of the ice sheet as a whole. This solution is useful for analysis and testing of numerical models, for evaluation of the response time of an ice sheet and for exploratory analysis of real bore-hole data. The lowest eigenvalue of the solution determines the time-scale for transient decay of temperature anomalies. The time-scale can be determined for more general strain-rates using a finite-difference approximation to the linearized energy-balance equation.
doi:10.1017/s0022143000008613 fatcat:rxbx67b2cjdbhgqkc4zmv5wtxy

Chance, contingency, and necessity in the experimental evolution of ancestral proteins [article]

Victoria Cochran Xie, Jinyue Pu, Brian P.H. Metzger, Joseph W Thornton, Bryan Dickinson
2020 bioRxiv   pre-print
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS We thank members of the Dickinson and Thornton groups for helpful comments on the manuscript, S. Ahmadiantehrani for editing, and R.  ... 
doi:10.1101/2020.08.29.273581 fatcat:fwlon43lyjffjiugcqerrvifwu

Negative niche construction favors the evolution of cooperation

Brian D. Connelly, Katherine J. Dickinson, Sarah P. Hammarlund, Benjamin Kerr
2015 Evolutionary Ecology  
By benefitting others at a cost to themselves, cooperators face an ever present threat from defectors-individuals that avail themselves of the cooperative benefit without contributing. A longstanding challenge to evolutionary biology is to understand the mechanisms that support the many instances of cooperation that nevertheless exist. In spatially-structured environments, clustered cooperator populations reach greater densities, which creates more mutational opportunities to gain beneficial
more » ... -social adaptations. Hammarlund et al. recently demonstrated that cooperation rises in abundance by hitchhiking with these non-social mutations. However, once adaptive opportunities have been exhausted, the ride abruptly ends as cooperators are displaced by adapted defectors. Using an agent-based model, we demonstrate that the selective feedback that is created as populations construct their local niches can maintain cooperation at high proportions and even allow cooperators to invade. This cooperator success depends specifically on negative niche construction, which acts as a perpetual source of adaptive opportunities. As populations adapt, they alter their environment in ways that reveal additional opportunities for adaptation. Despite being independent of niche construction in our model, cooperation feeds this cycle. By reaching larger densities, populations of cooperators are better able to adapt to changes in their constructed niche and successfully respond to the constant threat posed by defectors. We relate these findings to previous studies from the niche construction literature and discuss how this model could be extended to provide a greater understanding of how cooperation evolves in the complex environments in which it is found. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (
doi:10.1007/s10682-015-9803-6 fatcat:lk44c7cklvbsblg7pigzh3vcve

Memory and myth at the Buffalo Bill Museum

Greg Dickinson, Brian L. Ott, Aoki Eric
2005 Western journal of communication  
However, such critics, who have increasingly turned their attention to the material spaces of memory (Blair & Michael, 1999; Blair, Jeppeson, & Pucci, 1991; Dickinson, 1997; Gallagher, 1999 Gallagher,  ... 
doi:10.1080/10570310500076684 fatcat:kjuk6zcx7vgj5adsffomyaciba
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