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Technology probes

Hilary Hutchinson, Heiko Hansen, Nicolas Roussel, Björn Eiderbäck, Wendy Mackay, Bo Westerlund, Benjamin B. Bederson, Allison Druin, Catherine Plaisant, Michel Beaudouin-Lafon, Stéphane Conversy, Helen Evans
2003 Proceedings of the conference on Human factors in computing systems - CHI '03  
We describe a new methodology for designing technologies for and with families called technology probes. Technology probes are simple, flexible, adaptable technologies introduced into families' homes with three interdisciplinary goals: the social science goal of collecting data about the use of the technology in a real-world setting, the engineering goal of field-testing the technology, and the design goal of inspiring users and designers to think about new technologies. We present the results
more » ... f designing and deploying two technology probes, the MessageProbe and the VideoProbe, with families in France, Sweden, and the U.S. We conclude with our plans for creating new technologies based on our experiences. However, this study also suggests that when used for communication, computers and the Internet can play a positive role in keeping people connected -email, instant messaging, and family web sites are just a few of the ways the Internet helps keep people in contact. Thus, people continue to question the value of computer technology in their daily lives [23] . Given this skepticism, it is important to continue to explore if and how technology can be used to support communication with and awareness of the people we care about. In the last several years, there has been an increased interest in both academia and industry in designing technologies for homes and families (e.g. [13, 17, 18] ). Such design offers a number of interesting challenges. A huge diversity of ages, abilities, interests, motivations, and technologies must be accommodated. People are much more concerned about the aesthetics of technology artifacts in their home than at work [25] , their values may influence their use of technology [24] , and playful entertainment rather than efficiency or practicality may be the goal [6]. As part of the European Union-funded interLiving [11] project, we are working together with families from Sweden, France, and the U.S. to design and understand the impact of new technologies that support communication and coordination among diverse, distributed, multigenerational families. Using a variety of research methods from participatory design, CSCW, and ethnography, we have learned about the needs of the families, introduced them to new types of technology, and supported them in becoming partners in the design of new technologies. BACKGROUND One of the key objectives of the interLiving project is to experiment with different design methodologies. Each of the authors' organizations has long-standing experience in participatory design [22] , which remains the core strategy .
doi:10.1145/642611.642616 dblp:conf/chi/HutchinsonMWBDPBCEHRE03 fatcat:tbrog2feazbtpihfdf4cpkxzii

Technology probes

Hilary Hutchinson, Heiko Hansen, Nicolas Roussel, Björn Eiderbäck, Wendy Mackay, Bosse Westerlund, Benjamin B. Bederson, Allison Druin, Catherine Plaisant, Michel Beaudouin-Lafon, Stéphane Conversy, Helen Evans
2003 Proceedings of the conference on Human factors in computing systems - CHI '03  
We describe a new methodology for designing technologies for and with families called technology probes. Technology probes are simple, flexible, adaptable technologies introduced into families' homes with three interdisciplinary goals: the social science goal of collecting data about the use of the technology in a real-world setting, the engineering goal of field-testing the technology, and the design goal of inspiring users and designers to think about new technologies. We present the results
more » ... f designing and deploying two technology probes, the MessageProbe and the VideoProbe, with families in France, Sweden, and the U.S. We conclude with our plans for creating new technologies based on our experiences. However, this study also suggests that when used for communication, computers and the Internet can play a positive role in keeping people connected -email, instant messaging, and family web sites are just a few of the ways the Internet helps keep people in contact. Thus, people continue to question the value of computer technology in their daily lives [23] . Given this skepticism, it is important to continue to explore if and how technology can be used to support communication with and awareness of the people we care about. In the last several years, there has been an increased interest in both academia and industry in designing technologies for homes and families (e.g. [13, 17, 18] ). Such design offers a number of interesting challenges. A huge diversity of ages, abilities, interests, motivations, and technologies must be accommodated. People are much more concerned about the aesthetics of technology artifacts in their home than at work [25] , their values may influence their use of technology [24] , and playful entertainment rather than efficiency or practicality may be the goal [6]. As part of the European Union-funded interLiving [11] project, we are working together with families from Sweden, France, and the U.S. to design and understand the impact of new technologies that support communication and coordination among diverse, distributed, multigenerational families. Using a variety of research methods from participatory design, CSCW, and ethnography, we have learned about the needs of the families, introduced them to new types of technology, and supported them in becoming partners in the design of new technologies. BACKGROUND One of the key objectives of the interLiving project is to experiment with different design methodologies. Each of the authors' organizations has long-standing experience in participatory design [22] , which remains the core strategy .
doi:10.1145/642614.642616 fatcat:jqf3wlntpbeibasc2z3xdnnjri

Using marking menus to develop command sets for computer vision based hand gesture interfaces

Sören Lenman, Lars Bretzner, Björn Thuresson
2002 Proceedings of the second Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction - NordiCHI '02  
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We thank Björn Eiderbäck, CID, who performed the Smalltalk programming for the menu system. Olle Sundblad, CID, did the Java programming for the application control server.  ... 
doi:10.1145/572020.572055 dblp:conf/nordichi/LenmanBT02 fatcat:y3yowvltfnabdj5vfjsm4zveja

Using marking menus to develop command sets for computer vision based hand gesture interfaces

Sören Lenman, Lars Bretzner, Björn Thuresson
2002 Proceedings of the second Nordic conference on Human-computer interaction - NordiCHI '02  
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We thank Björn Eiderbäck, CID, who performed the Smalltalk programming for the menu system. Olle Sundblad, CID, did the Java programming for the application control server.  ... 
doi:10.1145/572043.572055 fatcat:r5vakvckpna5xiswfirj4unid4