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Abstract machines for programming language implementation

Stephan Diehl, Pieter Hartel, Peter Sestoft
2000 Future generations computer systems  
Abstract machines provide an intermediate language stage for compilation. They bridge the gap between the high level of a programming language and the low level of a real machine.  ...  We present an extensive, annotated bibliography of the abstract machines designed for each of the main programming paradigms (imperative, object oriented, functional, logic and concurrent).  ...  It is an optimized, strict version of the Krivine machine (see Section 6.2 below).  ... 
doi:10.1016/s0167-739x(99)00088-6 fatcat:qx6mlakihzecvlaiorgzuwdzxi

Evolution, Perfection, and Theories of Language

Anna R. Kinsella, Gary F. Marcus
2009 Biolinguistics  
In this article it is argued that evolutionary plausibility must be made an important constraining factor when building theories of language.  ...  Empirically, examples of imperfection are found not only in nature and in human cognition, but also in languagein the form of ambiguity, redundancy, irregularity, movement, locality conditions, and  ...  Could language be seen as some sort of optimal tradeoff?  ... 
doaj:7371014606674c1f856aa73d48fdf1b1 fatcat:db63hmqqgzdongjj7k7zri3qgm

The CODE 2.0 graphical parallel programming language

Peter Newton, James C. Browne
1992 Proceedings of the 6th international conference on Supercomputing - ICS '92  
Ease of use is provided by an integrated graphical/textual interface, a powerful dynamic model of parallel computation, and an integrated concept of program component reuse.  ...  CODE 2.0 represents a major conceptual advance over its predecessor systems (CODE 1.0 and CODE 1.2) in terms of the expressive power of the model of computation which is implemented and in potential for  ...  The CODE 2.0 translation scheme may be thought of as a grab-bag of optimizations. This is further explained in section 6.  ... 
doi:10.1145/143369.143405 dblp:conf/ics/NewtonB92 fatcat:oggvkiuggjcjdawfprbdvwk7w4

Language, Linguistics and Cognition [chapter]

Giosuè Baggio, Michiel van Lambalgen, Peter Hagoort
2012 Philosophy of Linguistics  
for their useful comments on earlier versions of this chapter.  ...  We are grateful to the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research for support under grant 051.04.040.  ...  This is an instance of the 'binding problem'.  ... 
doi:10.1016/b978-0-444-51747-0.50010-x fatcat:dljjbhz3qvglxh7rpw4x4qn4yq

Evolving a language in and for the real world

Bjarne Stroustrup
2007 Proceedings of the third ACM SIGPLAN conference on History of programming languages - HOPL III  
The emphasis is on the ideals, constraints, programming techniques, and people that shaped the language, rather than the minutiae of language features.  ...  This paper outlines the history of the C++ programming language from the early days of its ISO standardization (1991), through the 1998 ISO standard, to the later stages of the C++0x revision of that standard  ...  Java's stated aims seem more directed towards becoming an applications language (for some definition of "application").  ... 
doi:10.1145/1238844.1238848 dblp:conf/hopl/Stroustrup07 fatcat:at7lmbdzh5fsnofqizm3a4b2ue

Origins of the D programming language

Walter Bright, Andrei Alexandrescu, Michael Parker
2020 Proceedings of the ACM on Programming Languages (PACMPL)  
The D programming language began in 1999 as an effort to pull the best features of these languages into a new one.  ...  The language design was begun in late 1999. An alpha version appeared in 2001 and the initial language was completed, somewhat arbitrarily, at version 1.0 in January 2007.  ...  These lessons would have a lasting impact on Walter, influencing his thoughts about the design of existing programming languages and, two decades later, the design of D.  ... 
doi:10.1145/3386323 fatcat:vlsjnroggbg2bk6hhhktrqafj4

Programming languages for distributed computing systems

Henri E. Bal, Jennifer G. Steiner, Andrew S. Tanenbaum
1989 ACM Computing Surveys  
When distributed systems first appeared, they were programmed in traditional sequential languages, usually with the addition of a few library procedures for sending and receiving messages.  ...  These languages and their history, their underlying principles, their design, and their use are the subject of this paper.  ...  In Section 3 we look at some representative programming languages designed for distributed computing systems.  ... 
doi:10.1145/72551.72552 fatcat:y2afbdzlpbdgrhutfhgfuhfjmq

Growing solver-aided languages with rosette

Emina Torlak, Rastislav Bodik
2013 Proceedings of the 2013 ACM international symposium on New ideas, new paradigms, and reflections on programming & software - Onward! '13  
In practice, however, compiling a language to logical formulas is a tricky process, complicated by having to map the solution back to the program level and extend the language with new solver-aided constructs  ...  In principle, we obtain all these benefits by translating the program (once) to a constraint system understood by the solver.  ...  Acknowledgments This research was supported in part by awards from the Department of Energy (DE-SC0005136 and DE-FOA-0000619), National Science Foundation (NSF CCF-0916351 and NSF CCF-1139138), Samsung  ... 
doi:10.1145/2509578.2509586 dblp:conf/oopsla/TorlakB13 fatcat:uxouzyixrraflox2cfyxtimswi

A language-based approach to protocol implementation

Mark B. Abbott, Larry L. Peterson
1992 Computer communication review  
We have designed such a language, called Morpheus. The foremost advantage of a programming language is that it is an ideal vehicle for both imposing and benefiting from constraints.  ...  In other words, a language provides both the means to restrict the design choices available to the programmer and the medium in which to realize the advantages due to the narrower design domain.  ...  We have designed such a language, called Morpheus. The foremost advantage of a programming language is that it is an ideal vehicle for both imposing and benefiting from constraints.  ... 
doi:10.1145/144191.144201 fatcat:vqkw6ffahncttjmai6g2nsdq7a

A language-based approach to protocol implementation

Mark B. Abbott, Larry L. Peterson
1992 Conference proceedings on Communications architectures & protocols - SIGCOMM '92  
We have designed such a language, called Morpheus. The foremost advantage of a programming language is that it is an ideal vehicle for both imposing and benefiting from constraints.  ...  In other words, a language provides both the means to restrict the design choices available to the programmer and the medium in which to realize the advantages due to the narrower design domain.  ...  We have designed such a language, called Morpheus. The foremost advantage of a programming language is that it is an ideal vehicle for both imposing and benefiting from constraints.  ... 
doi:10.1145/144179.144201 dblp:conf/sigcomm/AbbottP92 fatcat:v3i5icdxqbh67i4q67kipt53be

A language-based approach to protocol implementation

M.B. Abbott, L.L. Peterson
1993 IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking  
We have designed such a language, called Morpheus. The foremost advantage of a programming language is that it is an ideal vehicle for both imposing and benefiting from constraints.  ...  In other words, a language provides both the means to restrict the design choices available to the programmer and the medium in which to realize the advantages due to the narrower design domain.  ...  We have designed such a language, called Morpheus. The foremost advantage of a programming language is that it is an ideal vehicle for both imposing and benefiting from constraints.  ... 
doi:10.1109/90.222903 fatcat:4vd4vqn7unfq7apib4fzztai2a

Super-Languages: Developing Languages and Applications with XMF (Second Edition) [article]

Tony Clark, Paul Sammut, James Willans
2015 arXiv   pre-print
This is done by defining the language, providing some examples of applications that can be written directly in the XOCL language that comes with XMF, and then by showing how XMF can be used for language  ...  The aim of this book is to introduce the language XMF.  ...  How do we bridge the representation chasm? The answer is in moving towards a new breed of language technology: super-languages.  ... 
arXiv:1506.03363v1 fatcat:57y27eubjzcujm4tqf37olfjca

A Definition, Overview and Taxonomy of Generic Aspect Languages

Günter Kniesel, Tobias Rho
2006 L objet  
However, it has been noted by various researchers that many of the first generation aspect languages do not provide the degree of reusability initially hoped for.  ...  A typical benefit of increased modularity is ease of maintenance, evolution and reuse.  ...  Our review of existing and proposed generic languages revealed five basic questions that language designers must consider when extending their aspect language towards genericity: − How are the values of  ... 
doi:10.3166/objet.12.2-3.9-39 fatcat:gjeupmumzncwnnbavsb4dz3lpy

A query language for multidimensional arrays

Leonid Libkin, Rona Machlin, Limsoon Wong
1996 Proceedings of the 1996 ACM SIGMOD international conference on Management of data - SIGMOD '96  
Next, we explore some optimization rules obtained from the equational laws of our core calculus.  ...  Finally, we study the expressiveness of our calculus and prove that it essentially corresponds to adding ranking to a query language for complex objects.  ...  Machlin was supported in part by ARO AASERT DAAH04-93-G0129 and ARPA N00014-94-1-1086.  ... 
doi:10.1145/233269.233335 dblp:conf/sigmod/LibkinMW96 fatcat:fik54mpxljaz7kjwu6zowfdhfq

Language and Nature

NOAM CHOMSKY
1995 Mind  
On more theory-internal grounds, then, we take an I-language to be an instantiation of the initial state, idealizing from actual states of the language faculty.  ...  Some Peircean ideal, perhaps? That doesn't seem promising. What the human mind can attain in the limit?  ... 
doi:10.1093/mind/104.413.1 fatcat:3sqnki2gizgqvc2io6ckhxau4m
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