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Clustering based hybrid approach for facility location problem

Ashish Sharma, Ashish Sharma, A. S. Jalal
2017 Management Science Letters  
The main objective of facility location problem is the utilization of the facility by maximum number of possible customers so that the profit is maximized. For instance, in some services like wireless sensor networks, Wi-Fi, repeaters, etc., where the service area is limited, some specific equipment is installed in such a way that it could be used by maximum number of users. Here, the number of users for a particular facility is optimized with the help of clustering technique. The study
more » ... a model for facility allocation problem. For the solution algorithm, a hybrid approach which is based on clustering and mixed integer linear programming (MILP) is proposed. The proposed method consists of two parts where in the first part, the K-means clustering technique is used and in the second part, for each cluster an MILP technique is implemented so that the facility which yields the maximum profit is obtained. Numerical examples for clustering and without clustering are presented. Analysis shows that due to clustering the average distance between facility and customer is significantly reduced.
doi:10.5267/j.msl.2017.8.007 fatcat:pwzbcmasyjgphncu2imbx6gf3m

Remote preconditioning by aortic constriction: affords cardioprotection as classical or other remote ischemic preconditioning? Role of iNOS

Ashish Sharma, Arshee Munajjam, Bhawna Vaishnav, Richa Sharma, Kunal Kishore, Ashok Sharma, Akash Sharma, Divya Sharma, Rita Kumari, Ashish Tiwari, B.P. Srinivasan, Shyam Agarwal
2011 Nature Precedings  
Dose remote preconditioning by aortic constriction (RPAC) affords cardioprotection similar to classical or other remote ischemic preconditioning stimulus? Moreover study was also designed to investigate role of inducible nitric oxide synthase in remote preconditioning by aortic constriction. There are sufficient evidences that "ischemic preconditioning" has surgical applications and afford clinically relevant cardioprotection. Transient occlusion of circumflex artery, renal artery, limb artery
more » ... r mesenteric artery preconditions the myocardium against ischemia reperfusion injury in case of ischemic heart disease leading to myocardial infraction. Here abdominal aorta was selected to produce RPAC. Four episodes of Ischemia-reperfusion of 5 min each to abdominal aorta produced RPAC by assessment of infract size, LDH and CK. These studies suggest RPAC produced acute (FWOP) and delayed (SWOP) cardioprotective effect. RPAC demonstrated a significant decrease in Ischemia-reperfusion induced release of LDH, CK and extent of myocardial infract size. L-NAME (10 mg/Kg i.v.), Aminoguanidine (150 mg/Kg s.c.), Aminoguanidine (300 mg/Kg s.c.), S-methyl isothiourea (3 mg/Kg i.v.), 1400W (1 mg/Kg i.v.) administered 10 min. before global ischemia reperfusion produced no marked effect. Aminoguanidine (150 mg/Kg s.c.), Aminoguanidine (300 mg/Kg s.c.), S-methyl isothiourea (3 mg/Kg i.v.), 1400W (1 mg/Kg i.v.) pretreatment after RPAC produced no significant effect on acute RPAC induced decrease in LDH, CK and infract size, whereas L-NAME (10 mg/Kg i.v.) increased RPAC induced decrease in LDH, CK and infract size. Most interesting observation is in delayed RPAC, where all NOS inhibitors pretreatment attenuate RPAC induced decrease in LDH, CK and infract size. In conclusions, "Remote preconditioning by aortic constriction" (RPAC) affords cardioprotection similar to classical or other remote ischemic preconditioning stimulus. Moreover, late or delayed phase of RPAC has been mediated by inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) whereas it has not involved in acute RPAC. Estimation of Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) LDH was estimated in coronary effluent by 2,4-DNPH method 23 . Principle LDH catalyses the following reaction: The pyruvate so formed is coupled with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH) to give corresponding hydrazone which gives brown colour in alkaline medium. The intensity of this colour is proportional to the amount of LDH activity and is measured spetrophotometrically at 440 nm.[ Figure 1 ] Estimation of Creatine phosphokinase (CPK) CPK was measured in the coronary effluent by modified method of Hughes 24 . 6 Principle CPK catalyses the following reaction: Creatine phosphate + ADP Creatine + ATP At pH 7.4, CPK catalyses the forward reaction. The creatine so formed, reacts with diacetyl and -naphthol in alkaline medium to give pink colour. The intensity of this colour is proportional to enzyme activity and is measured spectrophotometrically at 520 nm. Mg 2+ and cysteine are added as activators. P-Chloromercuribenzoate stops the reaction by inactivating the enzyme. Experimental Protocol Twenty four groups of Wistar albino rats were employed in the present study. Remote Aortic Preconditioning Induced Acute or First Window of Protection (FWOP): First window of protection (FWOP) was observed immediately after remote aortic preconditioning. Group 1 (FWOP Control Group; n=6) Rats were subjected to surgical procedure for aortic isolation but aorta was not occluded. Hearts were excised 40 min after sham operation. Isolated hearts were perfused on Langendorff's apparatus and were subjected to global ischaemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 120 min. Group II (FWOP Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n = 6) Rats were subjected to remote preconditioning by aortic constriction as described earlier. Hearts were excised immediately after last episode of reperfusion, perfused on Langendorff's apparatus and were subjected to global ischaemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 120 min. Group III (FWOP L-NAME (10mg/kg i.v.) 25 Treated Control Group; n=6) Rats were administered 10 mg/kg of L-NAME i.v., 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. Group IV (FWOP L-NAME (10mg/kg i.v.) Treated Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n=6) L-NAME (10 mg/kg i.v.) was administered during last episode of reperfusion during remote preconditioning by aortic constriction i.e. 10 min before isolating the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. Group V (FWOP Aminoguanidine (150mg/kg i.v.) 26,27 Treated Control Group; n=6) Rats were administered 150 mg/kg of aminoguanidine i.v. 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. 7 Group VI (FWOP Aminoguanidine (150mg/kg i.v.) Treated Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n=6) Aminoguanidine (150 mg/kg i.v.) was administered during last episode of reperfusion during remote preconditioning by aortic constriction i.e. 10 min before isolating the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. Group VII (FWOP Aminoguanidine (300mg/kg s.c.) 28 Treated Control Group; n=6) Rats were administered 300 mg/kg of aminoguanidine i.v. 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. Group VIII (FWOP Aminoguanidine (300mg/kg i.v.) Treated Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n=6) Aminoguanidine (300 mg/kg i.v.) was administered during last episode of reperfusion during remote preconditioning by aortic constriction i.e. 10 min before isolating the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. Group IX (FWOP S-methyl isothiourea (3mg/kg i.v.) 28 Treated Control Group; n=6) Rats were administered S-methyl isothiourea (3mg/kg i.v.) 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. Group X (FWOP S-methyl isothiourea (3mg/kg i.v.) Treated Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n=6) S-methyl isothiourea (3mg/kg i.v.) was administered during last episode of reperfusion during remote preconditioning by aortic constriction i.e. 10 min before isolating the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. Group XI (FWOP 1400W (1mg/kg i.v) 25 Treated Control Group; n=6) Rats were administered 1400W (1 mg/kg i.v.) 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. Group XII (FWOP 1400W (1mg/kg i.v.) Treated Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n=6) 1400W (1 mg/kg i.v.) was administered during last episode of reperfusion during remote preconditioning by aortic constriction i.e. 10 min before isolating the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Rest of the protocol was same as described in group I. 8 Remote Aortic Preconditioning Induced Delayed or Second Window of Protection (SWOP): Second window of protection (SWOP) was observed 24h after remote aortic preconditioning. Group XIII (SWOP Control Group; n=6) Rats were subjected to surgical procedure for aortic isolation but aorta was not occluded. Hearts were excised 24h after sham operation. Rest of the protocol was same as in group I. Group XIV (SWOP Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n=6) Rats were subjected to remote preconditioning by aortic constriction and hearts were excised 24h after remote aortic preconditioning. Rest of the protocol was same in group I. Group XV (SWOP L-NAME (10 mg/kg i.v.) Treated Control Group; n=6) Rats were subjected to same protocol as described in group XIV except that L-NAME (10 mg/kg i.v.) was administered 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Group XVI (SWOP L-NAME (10 mg/kg i.v.) Treated Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n=6) Rats were subjected to same protocol as described in-group XIV except that L-NAME (10 mg/kg i.v.) was administered 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Group XVII (SWOP Aminoguanidine (150 mg/kg i.v.) Treated Control Group; n=6) Rats were subjected to same protocol as described in group XI except that aminoguanidine chloride (150 mg/kg i.v.) was administered 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Group XVIII (SWOP Aminoguanidine(150 mg/kg i.v.) Treated Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n=6) Rats were subjected to same protocol as described in-group XIV except that aminoguanidine (150 mg/kg i.v.) was administered 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Group XIX (SWOP Aminoguanidine (300 mg/kg i.v.) Treated Control Group; n=6) Rats were subjected to same protocol as described in group XIII except that aminoguanidine chloride (300 mg/kg i.v.) was administered 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion. Group XX (SWOP Aminoguanidine (300 mg/kg i.v.) Treated Remote Preconditioning by Aortic Constriction Group; n=6) Rats were subjected to same protocol as described in-group XIV except that aminoguanidine (300 mg/kg i.v.) was administered 10 min before excising the heart for Langendorff's perfusion.
doi:10.1038/npre.2011.5494.1 fatcat:w4uhif7swvczvj3nquhragi7le

Simulation of Route Optimization with load balancing Using AntNet System

Ashish Kumar Sharma Ashish Kumar Sharma
2013 IOSR Journal of Computer Engineering  
This paper is based on analysis of the performance of load balancing and route optimization in computerized networks. The complete system model shows the scenario of Packet distribution between nodes, and if congestion occurs due to traffic then Packet to be failed. The model used the AntNet system for simulate the network. The simulation runs on the ant's behavior for the load balancing of the network. The ants travel across the network between alternative chosen pairs of nodes; as they travel
more » ... they deposit pheromones from their source node, collect the information of the route and the traffic congestion encountered on their journey. They select their path at each next node according the distribution of pheromones at each node. Packets between nodes are routed of the pheromone distributions at each next node. The performance of the network is proportional to packets which are failed. This model also shows the adaptivity of the system; the nodes are removed from the network, system finds the alternative chosen paths without system degradation and controls the performance of routing.
doi:10.9790/0661-1140107 fatcat:cj275itmxndyvomoapvvho5v3e

Chapter-03 Literature Review [chapter]

Ashish Sharma
2014 Fluoride and Fluorosis  
Erotetic logic, first proposed by Prior and Prior (1955), is a formal logical approach to the analysis of "all sentences that call for a reply" (Graesser and Black, 1985, p. 3). Erotetic logic decomposes questions into two parts: subject and request. The word "subject" is used here in an unconventional sense, to mean not the grammatical subject of the question, but the possible states of the world that are presupposed by the question. The request, therefore, identifies how many of these states
more » ... re desired in the answer. For example, Whether-questions presuppose a finite set of alternatives, as in the question "Is John going home?," for which the set of possible states of the world is that John either is or is not going home. Thus, while the grammatical subject of this question is John, the subject according to erotetic logic is John's home-going. The request, therefore, identifies that the desired answer is one that specifies which of John's alternative home-going states is true: that John either is or is not going home (Belnap and Steel, 1976, pp. 19-22). Which-questions, on the other hand, presuppose an infinite set of alternatives, as in the question "Which person is going home?" (Belnap and Steel, 1976, pp. 22-23). This approach to questions as decomposable into a subject and a request is similar to Jahoda and Braunagel's (1980) approach to reference questions as decomposable into a "given" and a "wanted." According to Jahoda and Braunagel, the given is "the subject of the information need," and the wanted is "the type of information needed about the subject" (p. 8). For example, in the reference question "I am looking for a book on herbal folklore," the given is herbal folklore, and the wanted is a book. Prior and Prior's (1955) version of erotetic logic treats questions as either true or false, according to whether or not the answer to a question is a true statement. This approach is problematic, however, in that some questions do not have either true or false answers. The classic example of this is the question, "Have you stopped beating your wife?," 15 which (at least when asked to a non-wife beating individual), cannot be answered either truly or falsely. This problem arises because this question presupposes something that is not true: that the individual questioned does or has beat his wife. Belnap and Steel (1976) solve this problem by suggesting a question be treated as true or false according to whether or not its presuppositions are true or false (p. 116). Belnap and Steel (1976) also suggest that there are two levels of presupposition: primary and secondary (p. 112). Primary presuppositions are those statements of fact that are implied by the question itself, and secondary presuppositions are those statements of fact that are implied by the primary presuppositions. For example, the primary presupposition of the question "Have you stopped beating your wife?" is that the individual questioned does or has beaten his wife. The secondary presupposition of that question is that the individual questioned is married. This study takes from erotetic logic the idea that questions may be decomposed into a subject and a request. Questions from the Perspective of Speech Act Theory Speech act theory is not a theory so much as it is a model of language-in-use, in that it addresses the issue of how language is used to accomplish tasks (Austin, 1999). Speech act theory relies heavily on erotetic logic in that it relies on the ability to decompose speech acts into a subject and a request. To this end, Austin outlines three layers of a speech act: communication" (Searle, 1995, p. 21); that is, the speech act is the vehicle by which tasks are accomplished using language. This study takes from speech act theory the idea that a question has force: that in asking a question, the questioner expects a certain action to be performed by the person questioned. The questioner expects that the action that will be performed will be to respond to the question, and it is irrelevant whether the person questioned is face-to-face with the questioner, or remote, and the question mediated by a computer interface. Questions from the Perspective of Discourse Analysis Discourse analysis relies heavily on speech act theory in that it is based on the premise that the speech act is the basic unit of communication (Schiffrin, 1994, p. 90). Speech act theory, however, presents a monologic model of communication: it treats speech acts as individual utterances without considering their connection to other utterances. Clark and Wilkes-Gibbs (1986) refer to this model of communication as the "literary model": that is, communication in which "speakers refer as if they were writing to distant readers" (p. 3). According to this literary or monologic model, the force of a speech act lies entirely in the speaker; the effect of a speech act on the audience is assumed to be whatever was the speaker's intended effect, and no provision is made for feedback from the audience to the speaker. Discourse analysis, on the other hand, takes feedback explicitly into account. Clark and Wilkes-Gibbs (1986), in opposition to the "literary model," propose what they refer to as the "conversational model." The difference between the conversational model and the literary model is illustrative of the difference between discourse analysis and speech act theory: that the listener is not "mute or invisible during an utterance," but rather is an active participant in a conversation, and indeed "speakers may alter what they say midcourse based on what addressees say and do" (p. 3). Indeed, Clark and Wilkes-Gibbs state that the listener is a collaborator in the performance of any speech act, and that for a speech act to have any force or effect at all, it must be "mutually accepted" by both the 18 speaker and the listener -or, more specifically, any speech act must be accepted by the listener, and the listener's acceptance must then be accepted by the speaker. Clark and Schaefer (1987) build on this idea of mutually accepted speech acts, and propose what they refer to as a contribution. A contribution is a combination of a speech act -that is, the utterance of some meaningful content -and the acceptance of that content. This acceptance occurs when "the speaker and addressees mutually believe that the addressees have understood what the speaker meant" (p. 20). Clearly, there must be some feedback mechanism at work in this model of conversation, since once the addressee accepts the speaker's speech act, the speaker must be able to observe that acceptance and accept it for himself. In a conversation, the addressee must, further, be able to observe this acceptance by the speaker, so that mutual acceptance exists and is known and acknowledged. When that is accomplished, the original speech act achieves the status of "common ground" between the speaker and the addressee, for the purposes of the conversation. Roberts and Bavelas (1996) propose a three-step model of the process of communication based on contributions to conversation and feedback between the speakers, who they refer to as "interlocutors." This model is presented in Figure 2 -1. This model is based on the premise that meaning is negotiated between the speakers, and there is a minimum of three steps that must be accomplished in order for any communication to be successful: 1. The Utterance is, quite simply, any single speech act, including non-verbal communication acts. So far, this is no different than the view of communication acts as viewed by speech act theory.
doi:10.5005/jp/books/12286_3 fatcat:5qdwivs55vc53eaj4feu3z3vm4

Strengthening Technical Skills Of School Children Using Single Board Computers

Sahil Sharma, Dev Ashish Mahajan, Prof.Shiv Kumar Sharma
2018 Zenodo  
Interest of school students in science subjects, nowadays, is reducing leading to their having poor technical skills, presumably due to lack of motivation, training, insufficient infrastructure in schools, resistance to adopting new technologies and high cost of training etc. So a study has been conducted to find ways to improve technical skills as well as arouse interest in science and technical subjects in school students. Survey conducted indicated that the interest in science subjects can
more » ... aroused by giving them hands-on experience with project based teaching. In this connection it is seen that pocket-sized, single board computers which have flooded the market in the last one decade could be very effectively used at the school level for giving hands-on experience to students. Project based teaching always attracts students, arouse interest in them to learn basic science subjects thus attaining technical skills which are required for making them practical hands. So in this paper, capabilities of various single board computers have been studied and suitable projects, are suggested which school children can undertake easily to promote creativity, inculcate technological skills and arouse interest in science and technical subjects in them.
doi:10.5281/zenodo.1415320 fatcat:ybvs6e24y5bj7c3fscbozaj2um

Engagement Patterns of Peer-to-Peer Interactions on Mental Health Platforms [article]

Ashish Sharma, Monojit Choudhury, Tim Althoff, Amit Sharma
2020 arXiv   pre-print
Future work is needed to investigate the causal impact of engagement patterns and their effects on short-term and long-term individual health (Saha and Sharma 2020) .  ...  We use threads posts on 55 mental health focused subreddits (list compiled by Sharma et al. (2018) ). We accessed the archive of reddit threads hosted on Google BigQuery spanning 2015 to 2019.  ... 
arXiv:2004.04999v1 fatcat:y7qhf7tyezahfbzvighiprfqqq

Hybrid Algorithm for the Facility Location Problem based on density based Clustering and Profit maximization

Ashish Sharma, Ashish Sharma, Anand Singh Jalal
2017 International Journal of Future Generation Communication and Networking  
The objective in the allocation of the facility depends up to the situation under consideration. For instance, in case of ATM, shopping malls, public utility services like schools, hospitals, etc. the facility is assigned, to such locations where the density of the users is more so that the facility will be utilized by as large as possible users. In such situation, the profit is at second priority as compared to utilization of facility. In this paper, we consider the same scenario and provide a
more » ... hybrid algorithm for the solution of facility allocation problem. In the first-step, we use DBSCAN clustering technique, and after clustering, mixed integer linear programming technique is used in each cluster to get the best facility which will generate the maximum profit. Flowchart of the proposed algorithm and numerical example is presented.
doi:10.14257/ijfgcn.2017.10.11.05 fatcat:wmjntj573bb4xelgeu5x2fdmuq

Malformation: Impending Danger in Mango Cultivation

Rajnee Sharma, Ashish Sharma, Jai Singh, T. R. Sharma
2020 International Journal of Current Microbiology and Applied Sciences  
Sharma et al., (2015) reported that increase in soil moisture content delayed the bud initiation and panicle emergence.  ...  ., 1984) , Himachal Pradesh (Sharma and Badiyala, 1990 ) Madhya Pradesh (Mishra, 2004) , Haryana (Mehta et al., 1986) and Andhra Pradesh (Kulkarni, 1979) .  ... 
doi:10.20546/ijcmas.2020.911.003 fatcat:3nt77zej2nb5zb6tphohhfwywm

Seed treatments for sustainable agriculture-A review

K.K. Sharma, U.S. Singh, Pankaj Sharma, Ashish Kumar, Lalan Sharma
2015 Journal of Applied and Natural Science  
Sharma et al. / J. Appl. & Nat.  ...  Sharma et al. / J. Appl. & Nat. Sci. 7 (1) : 521 -539 (2015) Table 1 . Chemical compounds currently used as small grain cereal seed treatments (Mathre et al., 2001) .  ... 
doi:10.31018/jans.v7i1.641 fatcat:szmjtwqgdne7jcprnbd7km6tmu

Understanding Scanner Utilization with Real-Time DICOM Metadata Extraction

Pradeeban Kathiravelu, Ashish Sharma, Puneet Sharma
2021 IEEE Access  
ASHISH SHARMA is currently an Associate Professor with Emory University.  ...  PUNEET SHARMA is currently an Assistant Professor with Emory University.  ... 
doi:10.1109/access.2021.3050467 fatcat:xbnaosihenan3edwx5mygqm3gi

Successful Endoscopic Removal of a Transmural Internally Migrating Gossypiboma

Ashish Agarwal, Ashish Chauhan, Sanchit Sharma, Kumble Seetharama Madhusudhan, Rajesh Panwar
2020 Journal of Digestive Endoscopy  
AbstractAn accidentally retained sponge inside the body of a patient (gossypiboma) is a rare and serious adverse event after a surgical procedure with serious medicolegal implications and complications. It is commonly associated with abdominal surgeries with cholecystectomy most commonly implicated. Whorl-like appearance or mottled translucencies and radiopaque marker on imaging is diagnostic. Transmural migration into a hollow viscous has been infrequently reported. The preferred approach for
more » ... he removal of gossypiboma is surgery. However, in cases of complete transmural migration, endoscopic removal remains a viable option.
doi:10.1055/s-0040-1717826 fatcat:vazzmkqidjdbnebtfte7ylv3de

A Complexity measure based on Requirement Engineering Document [article]

Ashish Sharma, D.S. Kushwaha
2010 arXiv   pre-print
Figure 4 5 4 Figure 4 Ashish Sharma, Department of Computer Science & Engineering, Motilal National Institute of Technology, Allahabad. D.S.  ... 
arXiv:1006.2840v1 fatcat:qad7qug64nforlbilm6tubqhzm

Data Cafe - A Dynamic Data Warehousing System

Pradeeban Kathiravelu, Ashish Sharma
2017 Zenodo  
Data Cafe can be used to construct data lakes in Hadoop HDFS from heterogeneous data sources, and query the data lakes efficiently by leveraging Apache Drill.
doi:10.5281/zenodo.844635 fatcat:d3dcvosqaff4fce7ln4m2w5hsy

Machine Learning Techniques and Testing

Ashish Verma, Kandy Arora, Aarush Sharma, Neelu Chaudhary
2019 Zenodo  
In this paper, we have discussed about various algorithms of the machine learning. These algorithms are used in various processes like image automated medical diagnostics, online advertising, robot incomotion etc.
doi:10.5281/zenodo.2615118 fatcat:uskijdpthfdufo2t5st6mw3sqy

miRNA-encoded peptide, miPEP858, regulates plant growth and development in Arabidopsis [article]

Ashish Sharma, Poorwa Kamal Badola, Chitra Bhatia, Deepika Sharma, Prabodh K Trivedi
2019 bioRxiv   pre-print
( Sharma et al., 2016; Wang et al., 2016).  ...  Sharma, D., Tiwari, M., Pandey, A., Bhatia, C. Sharma, A. and Trivedi, P.K. (2016). MicroRNA858 is a potential regulator of phenylpropanoid pathway and plant development.  ... 
doi:10.1101/642561 fatcat:myjmz45gdjdstbkujupap37no4
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