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RLZAP: Relative Lempel-Ziv with Adaptive Pointers [article]

Anthony J. Cox, Andrea Farruggia, Travis Gagie, Simon J. Puglisi and Jouni Sirén
2016 arXiv   pre-print
Given a position j between 1 and n, we can compute in constant time S[j] = M [B.rank(j)] if B[j] = 1, R D[B.rank(j) + 1] + j otherwise.  ...  Thus, knowing the starting position Start(j) and length Len(j) of phrase P j , symbol S[i] is a literal if and only if i > Start(j) + Len(j) − Lits(j).  ... 
arXiv:1605.04421v1 fatcat:jrbk7vqejrhh3hd7jwqyukssua

Complete Genome Sequence of the Human Gut Symbiont Roseburia hominis

Anthony J. Travis, Denise Kelly, Harry J. Flint, Rustam I. Aminov
2015 Genome Announcements  
We report here the complete genome sequence of the human gut symbiont Roseburia hominis A2-183 T (= DSM 16839 T = NCIMB 14029 T ), isolated from human feces. The genome is represented by a 3,592,125-bp chromosome with 3,405 coding sequences. A number of potential functions contributing to host-microbe interaction are identified.
doi:10.1128/genomea.01286-15 pmid:26543119 pmcid:PMC4645204 fatcat:u6scpc77rffgvi3h6qlrdxz6ba

Organic Chemistry and High Technology, 1850–1950

Anthony S. Travis, Willem J. Hornix, Robert Bud, John J. Beer
1992 British Journal for the History of Science  
The challenge facing early dyestuffs manufacturers in converting laboratory discoveries into reliable and economically viable industrial processes is sketched elaborately by Willem J.  ... 
doi:10.1017/s0007087400045295 fatcat:fmcelym4mbfx5cogl5lu3hvqby

Preparation of a Dihydrogen Complex of Cobalt

Travis J. Hebden, Anthony J. St. John, Dmitry G. Gusev, Werner Kaminsky, Karen I. Goldberg, D. Michael Heinekey
2010 Angewandte Chemie  
(t, 4 J(C,P) = 1.9 Hz, p-C), 110.3 (dd, 3 J(C,P) = 25.0 Hz, 5 J(C,P) = 1.1 Hz, m-C), 82.8 (s, i-C), 36.5 (d, 1 J(C,P) = 26.6 Hz, C(CH 3 ) 3 ), 27.9 ppm (d, 2 J(C,P) = 15.9 Hz, C(CH 3 ) 3 ); 31 P{ 1 H}  ...  H NMR (300 MHz, [D 8 ]THF): d = 7.12 (m, 1 H, p-H), 7.02 (m, 2 H, m-H), 1.21 ppm (d, 36 H, 3 J(H,P) = 11.8 Hz, tBu); 13 C{ 1 H} NMR (75.5 MHz, [D 8 ]THF): d = 160.7 (d, 2 J(C,P) = 10.4 Hz, o-C), 129.7  ... 
doi:10.1002/ange.201005281 fatcat:ccc4x7jgyvbu3lz7h7bcmizpdi

Temporal Variation in Structural Microhabitat Use ofPhelsumaGeckos in Mauritius

Travis J. Hagey, Nik Cole, Daniel Davidson, Anthony Henricks, Lisa L. Harmon, Luke J. Harmon
2016 Journal of Herpetology  
doi:10.1670/13-136 fatcat:rlye3zroizcujgxchfdyg3zvlq

Brain Noise Is Task Dependent and Region Specific

Bratislav Mišić, Travis Mills, Margot J. Taylor, Anthony R. McIntosh
2010 Journal of Neurophysiology  
J Neurophysiol 104: 2667 -2676 , 2010 . First published September 15, 2010 doi:10.1152 /jn.00648.2010 .  ... 
doi:10.1152/jn.00648.2010 pmid:20844116 fatcat:qyhltkxhdjgkhnzbwbpy64iwgm

Preparation of a Dihydrogen Complex of Cobalt

Travis J. Hebden, Anthony J. St. John, Dmitry G. Gusev, Werner Kaminsky, Karen I. Goldberg, D. Michael Heinekey
2010 Angewandte Chemie International Edition  
(t, 4 J(C,P) = 1.9 Hz, p-C), 110.3 (dd, 3 J(C,P) = 25.0 Hz, 5 J(C,P) = 1.1 Hz, m-C), 82.8 (s, i-C), 36.5 (d, 1 J(C,P) = 26.6 Hz, C(CH 3 ) 3 ), 27.9 ppm (d, 2 J(C,P) = 15.9 Hz, C(CH 3 ) 3 ); 31 P{ 1 H}  ...  H NMR (300 MHz, [D 8 ]THF): d = 7.12 (m, 1 H, p-H), 7.02 (m, 2 H, m-H), 1.21 ppm (d, 36 H, 3 J(H,P) = 11.8 Hz, tBu); 13 C{ 1 H} NMR (75.5 MHz, [D 8 ]THF): d = 160.7 (d, 2 J(C,P) = 10.4 Hz, o-C), 129.7  ... 
doi:10.1002/anie.201005281 pmid:21328660 fatcat:odm7qpgl7fdsxaprpjlx46i55m

Failure To Detect Prion Infectivity in Ticks following Prion-Infected Blood Meal

Ronald A. Shikiya, Anthony E. Kincaid, Jason C. Bartz, Travis J. Bourret, Mark D. Zabel
2020 mSphere  
Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging and fatal contagious prion disease that affects cervids, including mule deer, white-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, red deer reindeer, elk, and moose. CWD prions are widely distributed throughout the bodies of CWD-infected animals and are found in the nervous system, lymphoid tissues, muscle, blood, urine, feces, and antler velvet. The mechanism of CWD transmission in natural settings is unknown. Potential mechanisms of transmission include
more » ... , maternal, or environmental routes. Due to the presence of prions in the blood of CWD-infected animals, the potential exists for invertebrates that feed on mammalian blood to contribute to the transmission of CWD. The geographic range of the Rocky Mountain Wood tick, Dermancentor andersoni, overlaps with CWD throughout the northwest United States and southwest Canada, raising the possibility that D. andersoni parasitization of cervids may be involved in CWD transmission. We investigated this possibility by examining the blood meal of D. andersoni that fed upon prion-infected hamsters for the presence of prion infectivity by animal bioassay. None of the hamsters inoculated with a D. andersoni blood meal that had been ingested from prion-infected hamsters developed clinical signs of prion disease or had evidence for a subclinical prion infection. Overall, the data do not demonstrate a role for D. andersoni in the transmission of prion disease. IMPORTANCE Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an emerging prion disease that affects cervids, including mule deer, white-tailed deer, black-tailed deer, red deer reindeer, elk, and moose. The mechanism of CWD transmission in unknown. Due to the presence of prions in the blood of CWD-infected animals, it is possible for invertebrates that feed on cervid blood to contribute to the transmission of CWD. We examined the blood meal of D. andersoni, a tick with a similar geographic range as cervids, that fed upon prion-infected hamsters for the presence of prion infectivity by animal bioassay. None of the D. andersoni blood meals that had been ingested from prion-infected hamsters yielded evidence of prion infection. Overall, the data do not support a role of D. andersoni in the transmission of prion disease.
doi:10.1128/msphere.00741-20 pmid:32878935 fatcat:scwkzmzv2zfdlirc2sipwiz6zi

Long-Term Follow-Up of Percutaneous Balloon Angioplasty in Adult Aortic Coarctation

Alex J. Paddon, Anthony A. Nicholson, Duncan F. Ettles, Simon J. Travis, John F. Dyet
2000 Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology  
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2000;35(4):1003-6. 25. Vitiello R, McCrindle BW, Nykanen D, Freedom RM, Benson LN. Complications associated with pediatric cardiac catheterization.  ...  J Am Coll Cardiol. 1998;32(5):1433-40. et al. Pediatric therapeutic cardiac catheterization: a statement for healthcare professionals from the Council on Cardiovascular 24. Marx GR.  ... 
doi:10.1007/s002700010086 pmid:11060366 fatcat:xmfdzyox75bvhinwyymoy3ia2m

Complex genome evolution inAnopheles coluzziiassociated with increased insecticide usage in Mali

Bradley J. Main, Yoosook Lee, Travis C. Collier, Laura C. Norris, Katherine Brisco, Abdrahamane Fofana, Anthony J. Cornel, Gregory C. Lanzaro
2015 Molecular Ecology  
This work used the Vincent J. Coates Genomics Sequencing Laboratory at UC Berkeley, supported by NIH S10 Instrumentation Grants S10RR029668 and S10RR027303.  ...  Ag-Bamako is identified primarily by the presence of the j inversion on chromosome 2R and is A. gambiae -like on the X chromosome.  ...  Individuals that were homozygous for 2R j, c and u inversions were identified as the Bamako form (Toure et al. 1998; Lee et al. 2013a ; see supplemental information).  ... 
doi:10.1111/mec.13382 pmid:26359110 pmcid:PMC4615556 fatcat:iaiajaivhbdchfbgl3bej6acua

Genetic loci regulating cadmium content in rice grains

Gareth J. Norton, Anthony Travis, Panthita Ruang-areerate, Graeme W. Nicol, Ayotunde A. Adeosun, Mahmud Hossain, M. Rafiq Islam, Alex Douglas, Adam H. Price
2021 Euphytica  
GWA mapping was conducted using ''PIQUE'' (Parallel Identification of QTL's Using EMMAX, https://github.com/tony-travis/PIQUE) to pre-process genotype and phenotype data and then run association analysis  ...  The population used in this study is made up of rice accessions from the aus subpopulation of rice (Travis et al. 2015; Norton et al. 2018 ) and therefore does not have the high degree of stratification  ... 
doi:10.1007/s10681-020-02752-1 pmid:33627887 pmcid:PMC7875855 fatcat:gpz2tejhuvglppizr6hcwpkgie

Owner controlled data exchange in nutrigenomic collaborations: the NuGO information network

Ulrich Harttig, Anthony J. Travis, Philippe Rocca-Serra, Marten Renkema, Ben van Ommen, Heiner Boeing
2009 Genes & Nutrition  
New 'omics' technologies are changing nutritional sciences research. They enable to tackle increasingly complex questions but also increase the need for collaboration between research groups. An important challenge for successful collaboration is the management and structured exchange of information that accompanies data-intense technologies. NuGO, the European Nutrigenomics Organization, the major collaborating network in molecular nutritional sciences, is supporting the application of modern
more » ... nformation technologies in this area. We have developed and implemented a concept for data management and computing infrastructure that supports collaboration between nutrigenomics researchers. The system fills the gap between "private" storing with occasional file sharing by email and the use of centralized databases. It provides flexible tools to share data, also during experiments, while preserving ownership. The NuGO Information Network is a decentral, distributed system for data exchange based on standard web technology. Secure access to data, maintained by the individual researcher, is enabled by web services based on the the BioMoby framework. A central directory provides information about available web services. The flexibility of the infrastructure allows a wide variety of services for data processing and integration by combining several web services, including public services. Therefore, this integrated information system is suited for other research collaborations.
doi:10.1007/s12263-009-0123-8 pmid:19408032 pmcid:PMC2690731 fatcat:io75scofhfafrivv3jlbsza2xe

Metastatic cutaneous apocrine carcinoma: Multidisciplinary approach achieving complete response with adjuvant chemoradiation

Brian P. Hibler, Christopher A. Barker, Travis J. Hollmann, Anthony M. Rossi
2017 JAAD Case Reports  
Correspondence to: Anthony M. Rossi, MD, 16 E. 60 th Street, 4 th Floor Dermatology, New York, NY 10022. E-mail: rossia@mskcc. org. JAAD Case Reports 2017;3:259-62. 2352-5126 Ó  ... 
doi:10.1016/j.jdcr.2017.03.006 pmid:28580412 pmcid:PMC5447563 fatcat:7etljd2tfbhuffevrdyh3k5qjy

Cyclic Displacement After Meniscal Root Repair Fixation

Robert F. LaPrade, Christopher M. LaPrade, Michael B. Ellman, Travis Lee Turnbull, Anthony J. Cerminara, Coen A. Wijdicks
2015 American Journal of Sports Medicine  
Recent biomechanical evidence suggests that the meniscus-suture interface contributes the most displacement to the transtibial pull-out repair for meniscal root tears. Therefore, optimization of surgical technique at the meniscus-suture interface may minimize displacement and improve the strength of meniscal root repairs.
doi:10.1177/0363546514562554 pmid:25556220 fatcat:lbpjztaigrbydanhuxgq354zka

Blood Flow Restriction Training After Knee Arthroscopy

David J. Tennent, Christina M. Hylden, Anthony E. Johnson, Travis C. Burns, Jason M. Wilken, Johnny G. Owens
2017 Clinical Journal of Sports Medicine  
Quadriceps strength after arthroscopic knee procedures is frequently diminished several years postoperation. Blood flow restriction (BFR) training uses partial venous occlusion while performing submaximal exercise to induce muscle hypertrophy and strength improvements. The purpose of this study was to evaluate BFR as a postoperative therapeutic intervention after knee arthroscopy. Methods: A randomized controlled pilot study comparing physical therapy with and without BFR after knee arthroscopy
more » ... was conducted. Patients underwent 12 sessions of supervised physical therapy. Subjects followed the same postoperative protocol with the addition of 3 additional BFR exercises. Outcome measures included thigh girth, physical function measures, Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), Veterans RAND 12-Item Health Survey (VR12), and strength testing. Bilateral duplex ultrasonography was used to evaluate for deep venous thrombosis preintervention and postintervention. Results: Seventeen patients completed the study. Significant increases in thigh girth were observed in the BFR group at 6-cm and 16-cm proximal to the patella (P = 0.0111 and 0.0001). All physical outcome measures significantly improved in the BFR group, and the timed stair ascent improvements were greater than conventional therapy (P = 0.0281). The VR-12 and KOOS subscales significantly improved in the BFR group, and greater improvement was seen in VR-12 mental component score (P = 0.0149). The BFR group displayed approximately 2-fold greater improvements in extension and flexion strength compared with conventional therapy (74.59% vs 33.5%, P = 0.034). No adverse events were observed during the study. Conclusions: This study suggests that BFR is an effective intervention after knee arthroscopy. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate the benefits of this intervention in populations with greater initial impairment.
doi:10.1097/jsm.0000000000000377 pmid:27749358 fatcat:na7p7fawsvecncyjryjmgz4t2e
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