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Filial cannibalism in teleost fish

ANDREA MANICA
2002 Biological Reviews  
Rev. (2002), 77, pp. 261-277 © Cambridge Philosophical Societ DOI: 10.1017/S1464793101005905 = Printed in the United kingdom Filial cannibalism in teleost fish ANDREA MANICA Large Animal Research Group  ...  Manica parents can use their offspring as an alternative food 1992) and Sargent et al. (1995 developed dynamic models to formalize Rowher’s source.  ... 
doi:10.1017/s1464793101005905 pmid:12056749 fatcat:odlwkdc4zve53jqxw5q6wu6iwq

mtDNAcombine: tools to combine sequences from multiple studies [article]

Eleanor F Miller, Andrea Manica
2020 bioRxiv   pre-print
Today an unprecedented amount of genetic sequence data is stored in publicly available repositories. For decades now, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been the workhorse of genetic studies, and as a result, there is a large volume of mtDNA data available in these repositories for a wide range of species. Indeed, whilst whole genome sequencing is an exciting prospect for the future, for most non-model organisms' classical markers such as mtDNA remain widely used. By compiling existing data from
more » ... iple original studies, it is possible to build powerful new datasets capable of exploring many questions in ecology, evolution and conservation biology. One key question that these data can help inform is what happened in a species' demographic past. However, compiling data in this manner is not trivial, there are many complexities associated with data extraction, data quality and data handling. Here we present the mtDNAcombine package, a collection of tools developed to manage some of the major decisions associated with handling multi-study sequence data with a particular focus on preparing mtDNA data for Bayesian Skyline Plot demographic reconstructions.
doi:10.1101/2020.03.31.017806 fatcat:dn3xkqwwvngl5it2uv5kwk6hca

Identification and Functional Characterization of a Novel Insecticidal Decapeptide from the Myrmicine Ant Manica rubida

John Heep, Marisa Skaljac, Jens Grotmann, Tobias Kessel, Maximilian Seip, Henrike Schmidtberg, Andreas Vilcinskas
2019 Toxins  
We tested the crude venom of the predatory ant, Manica rubida, and observed severe fitness costs in the parthenogenetic pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum), a common agricultural pest.  ...  The most abundant peptides (relative peak intensity ≥ 3%) in the venom of Manica rubida.  ...  The most abundant peptides (relative peak intensity ≥ 3%) in the venom of Manica rubida.  ... 
doi:10.3390/toxins11100562 pmid:31557881 pmcid:PMC6832575 fatcat:4sneeuav3jhg7cx4qjbqapn3ui

Relocating agriculture could drastically reduce humanity's ecological footprint [article]

Robert M Beyer, Andrea Manica, Tim T Rademacher
2018 bioRxiv   pre-print
Agriculture is the main driver of global biodiversity loss, accounts for about one third of greenhouse gas emissions, and is responsible for 70% of freshwater use. How can land be used for agriculture in a way that minimises the impact on the world's natural resources while maintaining current production levels? We solved this more than 10 million dimensional optimisation problem and find that moving current croplands and pastures to optimal locations, while allowing then-abandoned areas to
more » ... nerate, could simultaneously decrease the current carbon, biodiversity and water footprint of global agriculture by up to 71%, 93% and 100%, respectively. This would offset current net CO2 emissions for half a century, massively alleviate pressure on global biodiversity and greatly reduce freshwater shortages. Whilst these achievements would require global coordination of agricultural policies, reductions of up to 59%, 78% and close to 100% are achievable by relocating production within national borders, with the greatest potential for carbon footprint reduction held by the world's top three CO2 emitting countries.
doi:10.1101/488841 fatcat:lcqa2sesb5byzma3q2fnjls6km

Referential gestures in fish collaborative hunting

Alexander L. Vail, Andrea Manica, Redouan Bshary
2013 Nature Communications  
We thank Karim Ait-el-Djoudi, Yoland Bosiger, Andrea Bshary, Hans Fricke, Talisa Kath, Bob Lamb, Rafia, Ingo Reipl and Tane Sinclair-Taylor for assistance in the field, and Klaus Zuberbühler for critical  ... 
doi:10.1038/ncomms2781 pmid:23612306 fatcat:rwglqoqcy5buxn7vkdaftdnq2a

Filial cannibalism in an assassin bug

Lisa K Thomas, Andrea Manica
2003 Animal Behaviour  
This latter strategy is common in fish, where females lay a large number of offspring which are relatively small compared with the adults, and commonly cannibalize their young (Manica 2002b).  ...  enables the parent to guard against potential predators without having to abandon the nest to feed) and may also increase its ability to produce and care for future broods (Rowher 1978; reviewed in Manica  ... 
doi:10.1006/anbe.2003.2202 fatcat:4quxoy7pzjdv7mc7low7qvjmaa

Metacommunity analyses show increase in ecological specialisation throughout the Ediacaran [article]

Rebecca Eden, Andrea Manica, Emily G. Mitchell
2021 bioRxiv   pre-print
The first animals appear during the late Ediacaran (572 – 541 Ma); an initial diversity increase was followed by a drop, interpreted as catastrophic mass extinction. We investigate the processes underlying these changes using the "Elements of Metacommunity Structure" framework. The oldest metacommunity was characterized by taxa with wide environmental tolerances, and limited specialisation and inter-taxa interactions. Structuring increased in the middle metacommunity, with groups of taxa
more » ... synchronous responses to environmental gradients, aggregating into distinct communities. This pattern strengthened in the youngest metacommunity, with communities showing strong environmental segregation and depth structure. Thus, metacommunity structure increased in complexity, with increased specialisation and resulting competitive exclusion, not a catastrophic environmental disaster, leading to diversity loss in the terminal Ediacaran, revealing that the complex eco-evolutionary dynamics associated with Cambrian diversification were established in the Ediacaran.
doi:10.1101/2021.05.17.444444 fatcat:7ypznji4fvfvja5jyl44qqzram

mtDNAcombine: tools to combine sequences from multiple studies

Eleanor F. Miller, Andrea Manica
2021 BMC Bioinformatics  
Background Today an unprecedented amount of genetic sequence data is stored in publicly available repositories. For decades now, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has been the workhorse of genetic studies, and as a result, there is a large volume of mtDNA data available in these repositories for a wide range of species. Indeed, whilst whole genome sequencing is an exciting prospect for the future, for most non-model organisms' classical markers such as mtDNA remain widely used. By compiling existing
more » ... a from multiple original studies, it is possible to build powerful new datasets capable of exploring many questions in ecology, evolution and conservation biology. One key question that these data can help inform is what happened in a species' demographic past. However, compiling data in this manner is not trivial, there are many complexities associated with data extraction, data quality and data handling. Results Here we present the mtDNAcombine package, a collection of tools developed to manage some of the major decisions associated with handling multi-study sequence data with a particular focus on preparing sequence data for Bayesian skyline plot demographic reconstructions. Conclusions There is now more genetic information available than ever before and large meta-data sets offer great opportunities to explore new and exciting avenues of research. However, compiling multi-study datasets still remains a technically challenging prospect. The mtDNAcombine package provides a pipeline to streamline the process of downloading, curating, and analysing sequence data, guiding the process of compiling data sets from the online database GenBank.
doi:10.1186/s12859-021-04048-0 pmid:33750296 fatcat:vgelt73fwfewngfi42txh2a22y

Corrigendum to: 'Reciprocity and conditional cooperation between great tit parents' by Rufus A. Johnstone, Andrea Manica, Annette L. Fayet, Mary Caswell Stoddard, Miguel A. Rodriguez-Gironés and Camilla A. Hinde. 25: 216–222

2015 Behavioral Ecology  
We found an error in our scripts estimating the proportion of alternated visits. This error does not affect any of the conclusions of the paper, but here we present revised estimates and figures after correcting our script. We originally reported the proportion of alternation to be 71.8 + 1.2%, with no difference between females and males (proportion of alternated visits 71.6 ± 1.6% vs. 72.1 ± 1.8%; paired t on arcsine square-root transformed data: t 20 = −0.22, P = 0.825). The correct value is
more » ... lower at 58.3 ± 1.3%, again with no difference between females and males (proportion of alternated visits 60.3 ± 3.2% vs. 60.7 ± 2.7%; paired t on arcsine square-root transformed data: t 20 = −0.02, P = 0.986). A revised version of Figure 1B is provided using the updated values. The erroneous estimates of the observed proportion of alternations were used in a randomization test aimed at showing that the observed alternation is not the consequence of the distribution of time intervals. Originally, we reported that "in the randomized data sets, both parents' tendencies to alternate were no greater than expected by chance, by contrast with the significantly higher levels observed in the original data set (proportion of alternated visits for females: 49.6%, CI = 48.8-51.3%, in the randomized data sets, vs. observed 71.6%; for males, 53.2%, CI = 51.4-55.0%, in the randomized data sets, vs. observed 72.1%; see Figure 3 )." The predicted intervals from the randomization tests (which were correct) are still markedly lower than the revised estimates for the proportion of alternated visits (for females, 49.6%, CI = 48.8-51.3%, in the randomized data sets, vs. observed 60.3%; for males, 53.2%, CI = 51.4-55.0%, in the randomized data sets, vs. observed 60.7%; see revised Figure 3 ). No other parts of the results were affected (the analysis based on runs tests and the Markov Chain models were fully correct). Female 0.4 0.5 0.6 Prop. alternated visits 0.7 0.8 0.9 (b) Male female 0.4 0.5 0.6 proportion of alternated visits 0.7 0.8 male Figure 1(b) Figure 3
doi:10.1093/beheco/arv063 fatcat:4i4l3y2fm5fhnb3rd7a6fyte6e

MICROWAVE IMAGING WITHIN THE INTERVAL ANALYSIS FRAMEWORK

Paolo Rocca, Matteo Carlin, Luca Manica, Andrea Massa
2013 Electromagnetic Waves  
An approach based on the use of the arithmetic of intervals and Interval Analysis for the solution of inverse scattering problems is presented and assessed. By exploiting the property of the Interval Analysis to find the global minimum of a functional in a n-dimensional space, the proposed approach adopts a branch and bound process to discard the regions of the solutions space not containing the global solution, while keeping those where a feasible solution is expected until a suitable converge
more » ... criterion is reached. A representative set of results concerned with the reconstruction of circular dielectric objects within the first-order Born approximation are reported and discussed to show potentialities and current limitations of the proposed approach.
doi:10.2528/pier13080304 fatcat:42ngafcqyvby7kwp74ciqwdjly

CRISPR-mediated defense mechanisms in the hyperthermophilic archaeal genusSulfolobus

Andrea Manica, Christa Schleper
2013 RNA Biology  
., a *Correspondence to: Andrea Manica; Email: andrea.manica@univie.ac.at Submitted: 01/25/13; Revised: 02/26/13; Accepted: 02/28/13 http://dx.doi.org/10.4161/rna.24154 CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced  ...  interference. 12, 14 The system tolerated up to four mutations at the 3'half of the crRNA and a more recent study in our laboratory demonstrates that many more mutations are tolerated by the system (Manica  ... 
doi:10.4161/rna.24154 pmid:23535277 pmcid:PMC3737324 fatcat:ahwefvy5onfa7lgiiydvqztqne

Microplastic ingestion rates are phenotype-dependent in juvenile anemonefish

Gerrit B. Nanninga, Anna Scott, Andrea Manica
2019 Environmental Pollution  
Andrea Manica: Formal analysis, Funding acquisition, Supervision, Writing -review & editing.  ... 
doi:10.1016/j.envpol.2019.113855 pmid:31918136 fatcat:gbz3ekjqkre2rplnpohuqjbz2e

Roving and Service Quality in the Cleaner WrasseLabroides bicolor

Jennifer Oates, Andrea Manica, Redouan Bshary
2010 Ethology  
doi:10.1111/j.1439-0310.2010.01742.x fatcat:uulmu2bfcvfx5f472fvobk6h5q

Geography predicts neutral genetic diversity of human populations

Franck Prugnolle, Andrea Manica, François Balloux
2005 Current Biology  
A leading theory for the origin of modern humans, the 'recent African origin' (RAO) model [1], postulates that the ancestors of all modern humans originated in East Africa and that, around 100,000 years ago, some modern humans left the African continent and subsequently colonised the entire world, displacing previously established human species such as Neanderthals in Europe [2,3]. This scenario is supported by the observation that human populations from Africa are genetically the most diverse
more » ... 2] and that the genetic diversity of non-African populations is negatively correlated with their genetic differentiation towards populations from Africa [3]. Here we add further compelling evidence supporting the RAO model by showing that geographic distance -not genetic distance as in [3] -from East Africa along likely colonisation routes is an excellent predictor for genetic diversity of human populations (R 2 = 85%). Our results point to a history of colonisation of the world characterised by a very large number of small bottlenecks [4] and limited subsequent gene flow. The pattern of decrease in genetic diversity along colonisation routes is very smooth and does not provide evidence for major genetic discontinuities that could be interpreted as evidence for human 'races' [2, 5] . In order to characterise the fine patterns in the decrease of genetic diversity in human
doi:10.1016/j.cub.2005.02.038 pmid:15753023 pmcid:PMC1800886 fatcat:pm5jvrlxizdfnak5yw365o3xza

Boldness and Information Use in Three-Spined Sticklebacks

Jennifer L. Harcourt, Samuel Biau, Rufus Johnstone, Andrea Manica
2010 Ethology  
Manica and a NERC studentship to J. Harcourt. We thank I. Goldstone for building equipment used in the experiments and assisting with care of the fish. We also thank A.  ... 
doi:10.1111/j.1439-0310.2010.01757.x fatcat:zxraa6rjkvfslfnqec3yczgleq
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