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Functional diversity of brain networks supports consciousness and verbal intelligence [article]

Lorina Naci, Amelie Haugg, Alex MacDonald, Mimma Anello, Evan Houldin, Shakib Naqshbandi, Laura E Gonzalez-Lara, Miguel Arango, Christopher Harle, Rhodri Cusack, Adrian M Owen
2018 bioRxiv   pre-print
How are the myriad stimuli arriving at our senses transformed into conscious thought? To address this question, in a series of studies, we asked whether a common mechanism underlies loss of information processing in unconscious states across different conditions, which could shed light on the brain mechanisms of conscious cognition. With a novel approach, we brought together for the first time, data from the same paradigm-a highly engaging auditory-only narrative-in three independent domains:
more » ... esthesia-induced unconsciousness, unconsciousness after brain injury, and individual differences in intellectual abilities during conscious cognition. During external stimulation in the unconscious state, the functional differentiation between the auditory and fronto-parietal systems decreased significantly relatively to the conscious state. Conversely, we found that stronger functional differentiation between these systems in response to external stimulation predicted higher intellectual abilities during conscious cognition, in particular higher verbal acuity scores in independent cognitive testing battery. These convergent findings suggest that the responsivity of sensory and higher-order brain systems to external stimulation, especially through the diversification of their functional responses is an essential feature of conscious cognition and verbal intelligence.
doi:10.1101/336859 fatcat:yuq6zw7455a7lhcxmo5bfr3uwi

Functional diversity of brain networks supports consciousness and verbal intelligence

Lorina Naci, Amelie Haugg, Alex MacDonald, Mimma Anello, Evan Houldin, Shakib Naqshbandi, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Miguel Arango, Christopher Harle, Rhodri Cusack, Adrian M. Owen
2018 Scientific Reports  
Telephone: +353 (0)87 688 5642 22 Email: nacil@tcd.ie 23 peer-reviewed) Abstract 24 How are the myriad stimuli arriving at our senses transformed into conscious thought? 25 To address this question, in a series of studies, we asked whether a common mechanism 26 underlies loss of information processing in unconscious states across different conditions, 27 which could shed light on the brain mechanisms of conscious cognition. With a novel 28 approach, we brought together for the first time, data
more » ... rom the same paradigm-a highly 29 engaging auditory-only narrative-in three independent domains: anesthesia-induced 30 unconsciousness, unconsciousness after brain injury, and individual differences in 31 intellectual abilities during conscious cognition. During external stimulation in the 32 unconscious state, the functional differentiation between the auditory and fronto-parietal 33 systems decreased significantly relatively to the conscious state. Conversely, we found 34 that stronger functional differentiation between these systems in response to external 35 stimulation predicted higher intellectual abilities during conscious cognition, in particular 36 higher verbal acuity scores in independent cognitive testing battery. These convergent 37 findings suggest that the responsivity of sensory and higher-order brain systems to 38 external stimulation, especially through the diversification of their functional responses is 39 an essential feature of conscious cognition and verbal intelligence. 40 41 peer-reviewed) is the author/funder. All rights reserved. No reuse allowed without permission. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not . http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/336859 doi: bioRxiv preprint first posted online Jun. 3, 2018; 4 unconsciousness, unconsciousness after brain injury, and individual differences in 64 intellectual abilities during conscious cognition. 65 66 Despite a growing number of anesthesia studies, it remains unknown how loss of 67 consciousness affects synthesis of information across sensory and higher-order brain 68 systems. To date, the majority of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies 69 of anesthesia have investigated the brain during a task-and stimulus-free condition, 70 known as the "resting" state, because behavioral responses and eye opening are impaired 71 by sedation prior to loss of consciousness (5) , which render traditional experimental 72 paradigms that probe complex information processing impossible to implement. 73 However, because resting state studies do not use sensory stimulation, they cannot shed 74 light on how the synthesis of external information breaks down from loss of 75 consciousness. Several studies have used simple psychophysical stimuli and, therefore, 76 have limited their investigation to well-circumscribed responses in sensory-specific 77 cortex (6). In the auditory domain, studies have used simple auditory stimuli to 78 investigate the limits of auditory processing during anesthetic-induced sedation. 79 Following light anesthesia with sevoflurane, activation to auditory word stimuli relative 80 to silence was preserved in bilateral superior temporal gyri, right thalamus, bilateral 81 parietal, left frontal, and right occipital cortices (7). Parallel results have been found with 82 both propofol and the short-acting barbiturate thiopental, suggesting that basic auditory 83 processing remains intact during reduced or absent conscious awareness (6,(8)(9)(10). 84 85 peer-reviewed) is the author/funder. All rights reserved. No reuse allowed without permission. The copyright holder for this preprint (which was not . http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/336859 doi: bioRxiv preprint first posted online Jun. 3, 2018; 5 By contrast, light anesthesia impairs more complex auditory processing (11-12). For 86 example, one study (13) showed that the characteristic bilateral temporal-lobe responses 87 to auditorily presented sentences were preserved during propofol-induced sedation, 88 whereas 'comprehension-related' activity in inferior frontal and posterior temporal 89 regions to ambiguous versus non-ambiguous sentences was abolished. However, this 90 study did not achieve the unconscious state due to low anesthetic doses. Thus, to date, no 91 anesthetic study has directly investigated how the loss of consciousness affects the 92 processing of a complex, real-world narrative across sensory-driven and higher-order 93 brain systems. 94 95 Another group of individuals-patients who lose consciousness after severe brain 96 injury-stand to shed light on the brain mechanism affected by loss of consciousness. 97 Following serious brain injury, a proportion of patients manifest disorders of 98 consciousness (DoC) and exhibit very limited responsivity to commands administered at 99 the bedside by the clinical staff. If entirely behaviorally non-responsive, they are thought 100 to lack consciousness-be in a vegetative state (VS) (14)-or, if they have reproducible 101 but inconsistent willful responses, to be in a minimal conscious state (MCS) (15). The 102 clinical, behavioral assessment of behaviorally non-responsive patients is particularly 103 difficult and can result in high misdiagnosis rate (41%) (16). Studies show that, despite 104 the apparent absence of external signs of consciousness, a significant minority of patients 105 (~19%) (17-19), thought to be in a VS, can demonstrate conscious awareness by willful 106 modulation of their brain activity (20-26), a phenomenon captured by the recently 107 proposed term 'cognitive motor dissociation' (CMD) (27). In the present study, to 108 peer-reviewed)
doi:10.1038/s41598-018-31525-z pmid:30185912 pmcid:PMC6125486 fatcat:nxftbq7xyvawros5pe4ftaxwhe

Disentangling craving- and valence-driven brain responses to smoking cues in individuals with nicotine use disorder [article]

Amelie Haugg, Andrei Manoliu, Ronald Sladky, Lea M Hulka, Matthias Kirschner, Annette B Bruhl, Erich Seifritz, Boris B Quednow, Marcus Herdener, Frank Scharnowski
2020 medRxiv   pre-print
Tobacco smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable death and disease worldwide. Most smokers want to quit, but relapse rates are high. To improve current smoking cessation treatments, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of nicotine dependence and related craving behavior is needed. Studies on cue-driven cigarette craving have been a particularly useful tool for investigating the neural mechanisms of drug craving. Here, functional neuroimaging studies in humans have
more » ... ified a core network of craving-related brain responses to smoking cues that comprises of amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, and ventral striatum. However, most functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) cue-reactivity studies do not adjust their stimuli for emotional valence, a factor assumed to confound craving-driven brain responses to smoking cues. Here, we investigated the influence of emotional valence on key addiction brain areas by disentangling craving- and valence-related brain responses with parametric modulators in 32 smokers. For one of the suggested key regions for addiction, the amygdala, we observed significantly stronger brain responses to the valence aspect of the presented images than to the craving aspect. Our results emphasize the need for carefully selecting stimulus material for cue-reactivity paradigms, in particular with respect to emotional valence. Further, they can help designing future research on teasing apart the diverse psychological dimensions that comprise nicotine dependence, and, therefore, can lead to a more precise mapping of craving-associated brain areas, an important step towards more tailored smoking cessation treatments.
doi:10.1101/2020.08.10.20171611 fatcat:bqhhh3fae5bxjihc2un2ijsgte

Do Patients Thought to Lack Consciousness Retain the Capacity for Internal as Well as External Awareness?

Amelie Haugg, Rhodri Cusack, Laura E. Gonzalez-Lara, Bettina Sorger, Adrian M. Owen, Lorina Naci
2018 Frontiers in Neurology  
Similar to the effect in healthy controls, these networks became more strongly juxtaposed to one another in response to movie viewing relative to the baseline Haugg et al.  ... 
doi:10.3389/fneur.2018.00492 pmid:29997565 pmcid:PMC6030833 fatcat:ejn435vgmff3zf3scg7a4cda4u

SmoCuDa: A Validated Smoking Cue Database to Reliably Induce Craving in Tobacco Use Disorder

Andrei Manoliu, Amelie Haugg, Ronald Sladky, Lea Hulka, Matthias Kirschner, Annette B. Brühl, Erich Seifritz, Boris Quednow, Marcus Herdener, Frank Scharnowski
2020 European Addiction Research  
Cue-reactivity paradigms provide valuable insights into the underlying mechanisms of nicotine craving in nicotine-dependent subjects. In order to study cue-driven nicotine craving, robust and validated stimulus datasets are essential. The aim of this study was to generate and validate a large set of individually rated smoking-related cues that allow for assessment of different stimulus intensities along the dimensions craving, valence, and arousal. The image database consisted of 330 visual
more » ... . Two hundred fifty smoking-associated pictures (Creative Commons license) were chosen from online databases and showed a widespread variety of smoking-associated content. Eighty pictures from previously published databases were included for cross-validation. Forty volunteers with tobacco use disorder rated "urge-to-smoke," "valence," and "arousal" for all images on a 100-point visual analogue scale. Pictures were also labelled according to 18 categories such as lit/unlit cigarettes in mouth, cigarette end, and cigarette in ashtray. Ratings (mean ± SD) were as follows: urge to smoke, 44.9 ± 13.2; valence, 51.2 ± 7.6; and arousal, 54.6 ± 7.1. All ratings, particularly "urge to smoke," were widely distributed along the whole scale spectrum. We present a novel image library of well-described smoking-related cues, which were rated on a continuous scale along the dimensions craving, valence, and arousal that accounts for inter-individual differences. The rating software, image database, and their ratings are publicly available at https://smocuda.github.io.
doi:10.1159/000509758 pmid:32854096 fatcat:qbzssj6gh5c57jsmjaddj7jb3u

Disentangling craving‐ and valence‐related brain responses to smoking cues in individuals with nicotine use disorder

Amelie Haugg, Andrei Manoliu, Ronald Sladky, Lea M. Hulka, Matthias Kirschner, Annette B. Brühl, Erich Seifritz, Boris B. Quednow, Marcus Herdener, Frank Scharnowski
2021 Addiction Biology  
Tobacco smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable death and disease worldwide. Most smokers want to quit, but relapse rates are high. To improve current smoking cessation treatments, a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of nicotine dependence and related craving behaviour is needed. Studies on cue-driven cigarette craving have been a particularly useful tool for investigating the neural mechanisms of drug craving. Here, functional neuroimaging studies in humans have
more » ... tified a core network of craving-related brain responses to smoking cues that comprises of amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex and ventral striatum. However, most functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) cue-reactivity studies do not adjust their stimuli for emotional valence, a factor assumed to confound craving-related brain responses to smoking cues. Here, we investigated the influence of emotional valence on key addiction brain areas by disentangling craving- and valence-related brain responses with parametric modulators in 32 smokers. For one of the suggested key regions for addiction, the amygdala, we observed significantly stronger brain responses to the valence aspect of the presented images than to the craving aspect. Our results emphasize the need for carefully selecting stimulus material for cue-reactivity paradigms, in particular with respect to emotional valence. Further, they can help designing future research on teasing apart the diverse psychological dimensions that comprise nicotine dependence and, therefore, can lead to a more precise mapping of craving-associated brain areas, an important step towards more tailored smoking cessation treatments.
doi:10.1111/adb.13083 pmid:34363643 pmcid:PMC9285426 fatcat:733bmxmm3fcothvnv45ejkgtq4

Self-regulation of the Dopaminergic Reward Circuit in Cocaine Users with Mental Imagery and Neurofeedback [article]

Matthias Kirschner, Ronald Sladky, Amelie Haugg, Philipp Staempfli, Elisabeth Jehli, Martina Hodel, Etna Engeli, Sarah Hoesli, Markus R. Baumgartner, James Sulzer, Quentin J.M. Huys, Erich Seifritz (+3 others)
2018 bioRxiv   pre-print
Enhanced drug-related reward sensitivity accompanied by impaired sensitivity to non-drug related rewards in the mesolimbic dopamine system are thought to underlie the broad motivational deficits and dysfunctional decision-making frequently observed in cocaine use disorder (CUD). Effective approaches to modify this imbalance and reinstate non-drug reward responsiveness are urgently needed. Here we examine whether cocaine users (CU) can use mental imagery of non-drug rewards to self-regulate the
more » ... entral tegmental area and substantia nigra (VTA/SN). We expected that compulsive and obsessive thoughts about cocaine consumption would hamper the ability to self-regulate the VTA/SN. Finally, we tested if self-regulation of the VTA/SN can be improved with real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback (NFB). Methods: Twenty-two CU and 28 healthy controls (HC) were asked to voluntarily up-regulate VTA/SN activity with rewarding non-drug imagery alone, or combined with rtfMRI NFB of VTA/SN activity. Obsessive-compulsive drug use was measured with the Obsessive Compulsive Cocaine Use Scale (OCCUS). Results: CU were able to induce activity in the dopaminergic midbrain and other reward regions with reward imagery. The ability to self-regulate the VTA/SN was reduced in those with more severe obsessive-compulsive drug use. NFB enhanced the effect of non-drug imagery. Conclusion: CU can voluntary activate their reward system through non-drug related imagery and improve this ability with rtfMRI NFB. Combining reward imagery and rtFMRI NFB has great potential for modifying the maladapted reward sensitivity and reinstating non-drug reward responsiveness. This motivates further work to examine the therapeutic potential of cognitive neurostimulation in CUD.
doi:10.1101/321166 fatcat:kkwbj62ezjd3jnxerazfcp5ao4

Anticipating control over aversive stimuli is mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex: An fMRI study with healthy adults

Laura Maria Wade-Bohleber, Amelie Haugg, Sabrina Huber, Jutta Ernst, Simone Grimm, Dominique Recher, Andre Richter, Erich Seifritz, Heinz Boeker, Georg Northoff
2021 Human Brain Mapping  
The anticipation of control over aversive events in life is relevant for our mental health. Insights on the underlying neural mechanisms remain limited. We developed a new functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task that uses auditory stimuli to explore the neural correlates of (1) the anticipation of control over aversion and (2) the processing of aversion. In a sample of 25 healthy adults, we observed increased neural activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (ventromedial prefrontal
more » ... rtex and rostral anterior cingulate cortex), other brain areas relevant for reward anticipation (ventral striatum, brainstem [ventral tegmental area], midcingulate cortex), and the posterior cingulate cortex when they anticipated control over aversion compared with anticipating no control (1). The processing of aversive sounds compared to neutral sounds (2) was associated with increased neural activation in the bilateral posterior insula. Our findings provide evidence for the important role of medial prefrontal regions in control anticipation and highlight the relevance of conceiving the neural mechanisms involved within a reward-based framework.
doi:10.1002/hbm.25549 pmid:34105855 pmcid:PMC8356988 fatcat:s7h56qdsnrgr7lk6kalagyd34a

Self-regulation of the dopaminergic reward circuit in cocaine users with mental imagery and neurofeedback

Matthias Kirschner, Ronald Sladky, Amelie Haugg, Philipp Stämpfli, Elisabeth Jehli, Martina Hodel, Etna Engeli, Sarah Hösli, Markus R. Baumgartner, James Sulzer, Quentin J.M. Huys, Erich Seifritz (+3 others)
2018 EBioMedicine  
Enhanced drug-related reward sensitivity accompanied by impaired sensitivity to non-drug related rewards in the mesolimbic dopamine system are thought to underlie the broad motivational deficits and dysfunctional decision-making frequently observed in cocaine use disorder (CUD). Effective approaches to modify this imbalance and reinstate non-drug reward responsiveness are urgently needed. Here, we examined whether cocaine users (CU) can use mental imagery of non-drug rewards to self-regulate
more » ... ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra (VTA/SN). We expected that obsessive and compulsive thoughts about cocaine consumption would hamper the ability to self-regulate the VTA/SN activity and tested if real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) neurofeedback (NFB) can improve self-regulation of the VTA/SN. Twenty-two CU and 28 healthy controls (HC) were asked to voluntarily up-regulate VTA/SN activity with non-drug reward imagery alone, or combined with rtfMRI NFB. On a group level, HC and CU were able to activate the dopaminergic midbrain and other reward regions with reward imagery. In CU, the individual ability to self-regulate the VTA/SN was reduced in those with more severe obsessive-compulsive drug use. NFB enhanced the effect of reward imagery but did not result in transfer effects at the end of the session. CU can voluntary activate their reward system with non-drug reward imagery and improve this ability with rtfMRI NFB. Combining mental imagery and rtFMRI NFB has great potential for modifying the maladapted reward sensitivity and reinstating non-drug reward responsiveness. This motivates further work to examine the use of rtfMRI NFB in the treatment of CUD.
doi:10.1016/j.ebiom.2018.10.052 pmid:30377073 pmcid:PMC6286189 fatcat:cqfzhgsy7bd77cvxqa7hlib4o4

Targeting hippocampal hyperactivity with real-time fMRI neurofeedback: protocol of a single-blind randomized controlled trial in mild cognitive impairment

Katharina Klink, Urs Jaun, Andrea Federspiel, Marina Wunderlin, Charlotte E. Teunissen, Claus Kiefer, Roland Wiest, Frank Scharnowski, Ronald Sladky, Amelie Haugg, Lydia Hellrung, Jessica Peter
2021 BMC Psychiatry  
Background Several fMRI studies found hyperactivity in the hippocampus during pattern separation tasks in patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI; a prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease). This was associated with memory deficits, subsequent cognitive decline, and faster clinical progression. A reduction of hippocampal hyperactivity with an antiepileptic drug improved memory performance. Pharmacological interventions, however, entail the risk of side effects. An alternative approach may
more » ... real-time fMRI neurofeedback, during which individuals learn to control region-specific brain activity. In the current project we aim to test the potential of neurofeedback to reduce hippocampal hyperactivity and thereby improve memory performance. Methods In a single-blind parallel-group study, we will randomize n = 84 individuals (n = 42 patients with MCI, n = 42 healthy elderly volunteers) to one of two groups receiving feedback from either the hippocampus or a functionally independent region. Percent signal change of the hemodynamic response within the respective target region will be displayed to the participant with a thermometer icon. We hypothesize that only feedback from the hippocampus will decrease hippocampal hyperactivity during pattern separation and thereby improve memory performance. Discussion Results of this study will reveal whether real-time fMRI neurofeedback is able to reduce hippocampal hyperactivity and thereby improve memory performance. In addition, the results of this study may identify predictors of successful neurofeedback as well as the most successful regulation strategies. Trial registration The study has been registered with clinicaltrials.gov on the 16th of July 2019 (trial identifier: NCT04020744).
doi:10.1186/s12888-021-03091-8 pmid:33563242 fatcat:vdra57zjqrajld32cufd4gjf4q

Embracing diversity and inclusivity in an academic setting: Insights from the Organization for Human Brain Mapping

Athina Tzovara, Ishmael Amarreh, Valentina Borghesani, M. Mallar Chakravarty, Elizabeth DuPre, Christian Grefkes, Amelie Haugg, Lee Jollans, Hyang Woon Lee, Sharlene D. Newman, Rosanna K. Olsen, J. Tilak Ratnanather (+6 others)
2021 NeuroImage  
Scientific research aims to bring forward innovative ideas and constantly challenges existing knowledge structures and stereotypes. However, women, ethnic and cultural minorities, as well as individuals with disabilities, are systematically discriminated against or even excluded from promotions, publications, and general visibility. A more diverse workforce is more productive, and thus discrimination has a negative impact on science and the wider society, as well as on the education, careers,
more » ... d well-being of individuals who are discriminated against. Moreover, the lack of diversity at scientific gatherings can lead to micro-aggressions or harassment, making such meetings unpleasant, or even unsafe environments for early career and underrepresented scientists. At the Organization for Human Brain Mapping (OHBM), we recognized the need for promoting underrepresented scientists and creating diverse role models in the field of neuroimaging. To foster this, the OHBM has created a Diversity and Inclusivity Committee (DIC). In this article, we review the composition and activities of the DIC that have promoted diversity within OHBM, in order to inspire other organizations to implement similar initiatives. Activities of the committee over the past four years have included (a) creating a code of conduct, (b) providing diversity and inclusivity education for OHBM members, (c) organizing interviews and symposia on diversity issues, and (d) organizing family-friendly activities and providing childcare grants during the OHBM annual meetings. We strongly believe that these activities have brought positive change within the wider OHBM community, improving inclusivity and fostering diversity while promoting rigorous, ground-breaking science. These positive changes could not have been so rapidly implemented without the enthusiastic support from the leadership, including OHBM Council and Program Committee, and the OHBM Special Interest Groups (SIGs), namely the Open Science, Student and Postdoc, and Brain-Art SIGs. Nevertheless, there remains ample room for improvement, in all areas, and even more so in the area of targeted attempts to increase inclusivity for women, individuals with disabilities, members of the LGBTQ+ community, racial/ethnic minorities, and individuals of lower socioeconomic status or from low and middle-income countries. Here, we present an overview of the DIC's composition, its activities, future directions and challenges. Our goal is to share our experiences with a wider audience to provide information to other organizations and institutions wishing to implement similar comprehensive diversity initiatives. We propose that scientific organizations can push the boundaries of scientific progress only by moving beyond existing power structures and by integrating principles of equity and inclusivity in their core values.
doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2021.117742 pmid:33454405 fatcat:bgd53kxosvfofgvznizmtbx5se

sj-pdf-1-jop-10.1177_0269881120972341 – Supplemental material for Dopaminergic neuromodulation has no detectable effect on visual-cue induced haemodynamic response function in the visual cortex: A double-blind, placebo-controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging study

Andrei Manoliu, Ronald Sladky, Sigrid Scherpiet, Lutz Jäncke, Matthias Kirschner, Amelie Haugg, Julia Bolsinger, Rainer Kraehenmann, Philipp Stämpfli, Frank Scharnowski, Uwe Herwig, Erich Seifritz (+1 others)
2020 Figshare  
Haugg, Julia Bolsinger, Rainer Kraehenmann, Philipp Stämpfli, Frank Scharnowski, Uwe Herwig, Erich Seifritz and Annette B Brühl in Journal of Psychopharmacology  ...  response function in the visual cortex: A double-blind, placebo-controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging study by Andrei Manoliu, Ronald Sladky, Sigrid Scherpiet, Lutz Jäncke, Matthias Kirschner, Amelie  ... 
doi:10.25384/sage.13379414.v1 fatcat:nn6vvtyynfb75avkczrzsusg2y

Can we predict real-time fMRI neurofeedback learning success from pre-training brain activity? [article]

Amelie Haugg, Ronald Sladky, Stavros Skouras, Amalia McDonald, Cameron Craddock, Matthias Kirschner, Marcus Herdener, Yury Koush, Marina Papoutsi, Jackob N Keynan, Talma Hendler, Kathrin Cohen Kadosh (+27 others)
2020 bioRxiv   pre-print
Neurofeedback training has been shown to influence behavior in healthy participants as well as to alleviate clinical symptoms in neurological, psychosomatic, and psychiatric patient populations. However, many real-time fMRI neurofeedback studies report large inter-individual differences in learning success. The factors that cause this vast variability between participants remain unknown and their identification could enhance treatment success. Thus, here we employed a meta-analytic approach
more » ... uding data from 24 different neurofeedback studies with a total of 401 participants, including 140 patients, to determine whether levels of activity in target brain regions during pre-training functional localizer or no-feedback runs (i.e., self-regulation in the absence of neurofeedback) could predict neurofeedback learning success. We observed a slightly positive correlation between pre-training activity levels during a functional localizer run and neurofeedback learning success, but we were not able to identify common brain-based success predictors across our diverse cohort of studies. Therefore, advances need to be made in finding robust models and measures of general neurofeedback learning, and in increasing the current study database to allow for investigating further factors that might influence neurofeedback learning.
doi:10.1101/2020.01.15.906388 fatcat:6r2uoywmx5exlouer7s3rhpryq

Can we predict real‐time fMRI neurofeedback learning success from pretraining brain activity?

Amelie Haugg, Ronald Sladky, Stavros Skouras, Amalia McDonald, Cameron Craddock, Matthias Kirschner, Marcus Herdener, Yury Koush, Marina Papoutsi, Jackob N. Keynan, Talma Hendler, Kathrin Cohen Kadosh (+27 others)
2020 Human Brain Mapping  
Neurofeedback training has been shown to influence behavior in healthy participants as well as to alleviate clinical symptoms in neurological, psychosomatic, and psychiatric patient populations. However, many real-time fMRI neurofeedback studies report large inter-individual differences in learning success. The factors that cause this vast variability between participants remain unknown and their identification could enhance treatment success. Thus, here we employed a meta-analytic approach
more » ... uding data from 24 different neurofeedback studies with a total of 401 participants, including 140 patients, to determine whether levels of activity in target brain regions during pretraining functional localizer or no-feedback runs (i.e., self-regulation in the absence of neurofeedback) could predict neurofeedback learning success. We observed a slightly positive correlation between pretraining activity levels during a functional localizer run and neurofeedback learning success, but we were not able to identify common brain-based success predictors across our diverse cohort of studies. Therefore, advances need to be made in finding robust models and measures of general neurofeedback learning, and in increasing the current study database to allow for investigating further factors that might influence neurofeedback learning.
doi:10.1002/hbm.25089 pmid:32729652 pmcid:PMC7469782 fatcat:b3t5zelgq5bhxpv2ymb6g3n27i

Determinants of Real-Time fMRI Neurofeedback Performance and Improvement: a Machine Learning Mega-Analysis [article]

Amelie Haugg, Fabian M Renz, Andrew A Nicholson, Cindy Lor, Sebastian J Goetzendorfer, Ronald Sladky, Stavros Skouras, Amalia McDonald, Cameron Craddock, Lydia Hellrung, Matthias Kirschner, Marcus Herdener (+36 others)
2020 bioRxiv   pre-print
Averaging across these studies, the non-responder rate of real-time fMRI neurofeedback studies is estimated to lie around 38% (Haugg et al., 2020) .  ...  To date, no commonly accepted measure for neurofeedback success has been established and measures vary between different studies (Haugg et al., 2020; Paret et al., 2019; Thibault et al., 2018) .  ... 
doi:10.1101/2020.10.21.349118 fatcat:2brcvaet6jae7lvop2oaxoclaa
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